Law School Discussion

Specific Groups => Black Law Students => Topic started by: TruOne on August 28, 2007, 11:51:08 AM

Title: Life as a 2L
Post by: TruOne on August 28, 2007, 11:51:08 AM
So now I've successfully stormed the beach and made it thru 1L HELL, and I PROMISE you that you could never pay me to go thru that bull again!

ANYHOW, to all my 2Ls (and some 3Ls). How is life/law school different for you now. Do you enjoy school, or do you still carry a general distain for the ivory towers of academia?
Title: Re: Life as a 2L
Post by: Burning Sands, Esq. on August 28, 2007, 11:51:49 AM
LOL 


 :D
Title: Re: Life as a 2L
Post by: cui bono? on August 28, 2007, 01:26:19 PM
def can breathe easier academically
Title: Re: Life as a 2L
Post by: Burning Sands, Esq. on August 28, 2007, 01:31:22 PM
2L is a busy-azz year.  Interviewing for a job IS a job.  Plus, if you belong to any group at all, you more than likely have taken an active leadership position during 2L, not to mention Moot Court, Law Review, judicial externship, BLSA conventions, [fill in the blank], etc.  Just busy.
Title: Re: Life as a 2L
Post by: TruOne on August 28, 2007, 04:40:24 PM
2L is a busy-azz year.  Interviewing for a job IS a job.  Plus, if you belong to any group at all, you more than likely have taken an active leadership position during 2L, not to mention Moot Court, Law Review, judicial externship, BLSA conventions, [fill in the blank], etc.  Just busy.

Don't get me started on BLSA. Why in the hell did they pick Detroit of all places for the National Convention? Don't they know it's COLD in Detroit in March? Plus somebody gonna get shot, all them bougie black folx in suits, somebody is gonna get shot, then stabbed, and maybe shot again for good measure.

They need to just keep it in Atlanta and make everybody happy.

But yer right about everything else. I got Moot Court/BLSA/AND Job hunting! I don't know why the jobs don't just look at my resume, and then be like, "Ok Darkie, we need a colored face around here. You got a job" Let's just save all the jibber-jabbin' and gasoline.
Title: Re: Life as a 2L
Post by: A. on August 28, 2007, 04:45:16 PM
Don't get me started on BLSA. Why in the hell did they pick Detroit of all places for the National Convention? Don't they know it's COLD in Detroit in March? Plus somebody gonna get shot, all them bougie black folx in suits, somebody is gonna get shot, then stabbed, and maybe shot again for good measure.

They need to just keep it in Atlanta and make everybody happy.

 :D
Title: Re: Life as a 2L
Post by: TruOne on August 28, 2007, 04:49:23 PM
Don't get me started on BLSA. Why in the hell did they pick Detroit of all places for the National Convention? Don't they know it's COLD in Detroit in March? Plus somebody gonna get shot, all them bougie black folx in suits, somebody is gonna get shot, then stabbed, and maybe shot again for good measure.

They need to just keep it in Atlanta and make everybody happy.

 :D


Seriously, at least in Atlanta there is little to no chance that somebody will rob you for your Chinchilla or Fur coat, cuz it's too damn hot for that down here. At most, you might get lost cuz you forgot that Peachtree Street is a one way street and that it is completely different than Peachtree Center, or Peachtree Ave. or Peachtree Battle or the dozen other streets named Peachtree.

I thought Lawyers were supposed to specialize in SOLVING problems, not making more?
Title: Re: Life as a 2L
Post by: cui bono? on August 28, 2007, 04:53:49 PM
LMAO.

Don't get me started on BLSA. Why in the hell did they pick Detroit of all places for the National Convention? Don't they know it's COLD in Detroit in March? Plus somebody gonna get shot, all them bougie black folx in suits, somebody is gonna get shot, then stabbed, and maybe shot again for good measure.

They need to just keep it in Atlanta and make everybody happy.

 :D


Seriously, at least in Atlanta there is little to no chance that somebody will rob you for your Chinchilla or Fur coat, cuz it's too damn hot for that down here. At most, you might get lost cuz you forgot that Peachtree Street is a one way street and that it is completely different than Peachtree Center, or Peachtree Ave. or Peachtree Battle or the dozen other streets named Peachtree.

I thought Lawyers were supposed to specialize in SOLVING problems, not making more?

since when?
Title: Re: Life as a 2L
Post by: TruOne on August 28, 2007, 05:01:52 PM
LMAO.

Don't get me started on BLSA. Why in the hell did they pick Detroit of all places for the National Convention? Don't they know it's COLD in Detroit in March? Plus somebody gonna get shot, all them bougie black folx in suits, somebody is gonna get shot, then stabbed, and maybe shot again for good measure.

They need to just keep it in Atlanta and make everybody happy.

 :D


Seriously, at least in Atlanta there is little to no chance that somebody will rob you for your Chinchilla or Fur coat, cuz it's too damn hot for that down here. At most, you might get lost cuz you forgot that Peachtree Street is a one way street and that it is completely different than Peachtree Center, or Peachtree Ave. or Peachtree Battle or the dozen other streets named Peachtree.

I thought Lawyers were supposed to specialize in SOLVING problems, not making more?

since when?

That's what they told me when they took my $$$ this semester and the two previous ones. I still believe the concept of "Law School" is really just a cash-cow for Major Universities. How much does it really cost to have some brainiac former Supreme Court Clerk stand in a room of naive over-achievers and discuss the underlying philosophies of the law and give RIDICULOUS situations that probably will never occur in real life?

This is some Amway-type hustlin' goin' on!
Title: Re: Life as a 2L
Post by: A. on August 28, 2007, 06:01:09 PM
cuz you forgot that Peachtree Street is a one way street

Peachtree is definitely two-way.
Title: Re: Life as a 2L
Post by: blk_reign on August 28, 2007, 06:03:05 PM
i thought so...

cuz you forgot that Peachtree Street is a one way street

Peachtree is definitely two-way.
Title: Re: Life as a 2L
Post by: Burning Sands, Esq. on August 29, 2007, 10:49:05 AM
2L is a busy-azz year.  Interviewing for a job IS a job.  Plus, if you belong to any group at all, you more than likely have taken an active leadership position during 2L, not to mention Moot Court, Law Review, judicial externship, BLSA conventions, [fill in the blank], etc.  Just busy.

Don't get me started on BLSA. Why in the hell did they pick Detroit of all places for the National Convention? Don't they know it's COLD in Detroit in March? Plus somebody gonna get shot, all them bougie black folx in suits, somebody is gonna get shot, then stabbed, and maybe shot again for good measure.



The national convention rotates through each region every year.  It was supposed to be in Chicago next spring but they moved it to Detroit to save $ for all of you conference goers because the Chicago hotels were going to make everybody pay something crazy, and Detroit's hotel (where the NBA conference was August 2006) is half the price and is actually a nice hotel and it meets the needs in terms of numbers and space.  Should be a good look.
Title: Re: Life as a 2L
Post by: Burning Sands, Esq. on August 29, 2007, 12:23:22 PM
LMAO.

Don't get me started on BLSA. Why in the hell did they pick Detroit of all places for the National Convention? Don't they know it's COLD in Detroit in March? Plus somebody gonna get shot, all them bougie black folx in suits, somebody is gonna get shot, then stabbed, and maybe shot again for good measure.

They need to just keep it in Atlanta and make everybody happy.

 :D


Seriously, at least in Atlanta there is little to no chance that somebody will rob you for your Chinchilla or Fur coat, cuz it's too damn hot for that down here. At most, you might get lost cuz you forgot that Peachtree Street is a one way street and that it is completely different than Peachtree Center, or Peachtree Ave. or Peachtree Battle or the dozen other streets named Peachtree.

I thought Lawyers were supposed to specialize in SOLVING problems, not making more?

since when?

That's what they told me when they took my $$$ this semester and the two previous ones. I still believe the concept of "Law School" is really just a cash-cow for Major Universities. How much does it really cost to have some brainiac former Supreme Court Clerk stand in a room of naive over-achievers and discuss the underlying philosophies of the law and give RIDICULOUS situations that probably will never occur in real life?

This is some Amway-type hustlin' goin' on!



Now you're on to something.  This whole law school system that we know today is more so driven by the mighty dollar than the pursuit of legal knowledge.

Don't ask me why, but I ran across this book that was talking about the history of law school (yeah I need a job) and it was talking about how from 1776 until the 1900's, the first lawyers in this country didn't even go to law school at all, but instead just shadowed another lawyer as an apprentice until they were ready to take some type of test in front of a judge; the format of which basically changed from judge to judge.  Law Schools didn't even start to come about until the  1800's, and even then, you could go straight to law school without having to go to college first (or at all), and formal legal education was still not required in order to be admitted to the bar - you could still go the apprenticeship route.

As more and more cats started gaining access to legal education and the ability to practice law, the collective bar associations started to change the game up. 

First rule: No more apprenticeship admits - you gotta go through law school, thus making law schools the official gatekeepers. 
Second rule: No more going straight to law school - you must have college credentials to even apply to law school.  And speaking of applying to law schools...
Third Rule: No more of this unregulated, discretionary law school admission stuff - the LSAT is created in 1947.

Once these systems were in place, universities were able to monopolize total access to the legal profession and began to add law schools to their campuses as a means of raising revenues.


There was a whole lot more to it that I left out, but that was the book's general gist.  TruOne's post reminded me of that book and the state of things for law school education so I thought I'd throw that out there as food for thought.



Title: Re: Life as a 2L
Post by: cui bono? on August 29, 2007, 12:37:36 PM
LOL, what book was that?
Title: Re: Life as a 2L
Post by: A. on August 29, 2007, 12:48:16 PM
Lol the first law schools were basically just copying profs' lectures (which were just expositions of the law) verbatim to create your own law books.  Tedious and boring.  Law didn't get interesting until the socratic method came around.
Title: Re: Life as a 2L
Post by: t... on August 29, 2007, 12:58:44 PM
In some states you don't necessarily have to go to law school to sit for (and hopefully pass) the bar.

Good luck finding a job, though.

Anyway, carry on...
Title: Re: Life as a 2L
Post by: jd06 on August 29, 2007, 12:59:34 PM
I remember reading that law school history stuff as an introduction to a PR text somewhere along the line.  In addition to the revenune raising function, and perhaps more importantly to many bar members, extraordinarily expensive law schools with extremely high admissions standards serve to ensure that the profession generally remains open only to the privileged.  I was a non-traditional student (working full-time while attending ls part-time at night).  Were it not for that opportunity I wouldn't be a lawyer.  I don't think the same is afforded to prospective students in many other states (I'm in CA) and that's a shame.  Witness all the ranting and raving on sites like this about "Big Law" and "T-14's." Nothing wrong with those endeavors but there's a lot more to the profession than that.  A lot of that talk simply harkens back to the history of the profession as one for only the privileged.      
Title: Re: Life as a 2L
Post by: Burning Sands, Esq. on August 29, 2007, 01:01:07 PM
LOL, what book was that?

One of those getting into law school books I have in my closet.  It was something like "Law School Today" or "Getting into Law School Today" or something like that.  I can dig it up if ya'll want. 

It's funny, I find myself skimming through these books every now and again now that it's all said and done - I find it interesting to see what other folks thought would be important for entering 1L's to know about getting into law school and just what folks write about law school in general.  For most of it, I read it and nod my head like "yup, that definitely happened," but on some of the other stuff I'm like "ehhh... not so much."


Title: Re: Life as a 2L
Post by: cui bono? on August 29, 2007, 01:16:41 PM
In some states you don't necessarily have to go to law school to sit for (and hopefully pass) the bar.

Good luck finding a job, though.

Anyway, carry on...

man, bump that, where?  how soon do u think I can move?  :D  j/k

LOL, what book was that?

One of those getting into law school books I have in my closet.  It was something like "Law School Today" or "Getting into Law School Today" or something like that.  I can dig it up if ya'll want. 

It's funny, I find myself skimming through these books every now and again now that it's all said and done - I find it interesting to see what other folks thought would be important for entering 1L's to know about getting into law school and just what folks write about law school in general.  For most of it, I read it and nod my head like "yup, that definitely happened," but on some of the other stuff I'm like "ehhh... not so much."




Oh okay, I got plenty of those in my closet both here and in NY  :D  I like digging those  out only to read some little crazy uninformed note I wrote to myself in the margin.  Ah memories  :D
Title: Re: Life as a 2L
Post by: Burning Sands, Esq. on August 29, 2007, 01:28:38 PM
I remember reading that law school history stuff as an introduction to a PR text somewhere along the line.  In addition to the revenune raising function, and perhaps more importantly to many bar members, extraordinarily expensive law schools with extremely high admissions standards serve to ensure that the profession generally remains open only to the privileged.  I was a non-traditional student (working full-time while attending ls part-time at night).  Were it not for that opportunity I wouldn't be a lawyer.  I don't think the same is afforded to prospective students in many other states (I'm in CA) and that's a shame.  Witness all the ranting and raving on sites like this about "Big Law" and "T-14's." Nothing wrong with those endeavors but there's a lot more to the profession than that.  A lot of that talk simply harkens back to the history of the profession as one for only the privileged.     


We may have to start a whole new thread for this convo, but this statement is definitely on point!  I have read that in a few different places before (in addition to being told by numerous practitioners) - something along the lines of the fact that this nation was founded by lawyers for lawyers and access to the law is one of the most coveted and protected prizes in our society.

In addition to the many hurdles one has to jump in order to even gain access to the law in the first place, the "rankings" ensure that if you didn't gain access to the law from the right school then your access is perceived as less than the next man's access. Thus, whether done wittingly or unwittingly, the ranking-whores serve to maintain that elite level of law reserved for the privileged since legal education itself no longer can do so as effectively as it used to before the advent of evening programs, part-time programs, non-accredited law schools and the like.

Title: Re: Life as a 2L
Post by: cui bono? on August 29, 2007, 01:52:32 PM
Agreed.  But what bugs me is that we're just conforming to that.  No one is really trying to break the mold.  We all just kinda fall in line with it. 
Title: Re: Life as a 2L
Post by: t... on August 29, 2007, 02:22:20 PM
Planet Law School is the book you're thinking of, Sands.

And I think CA is the only state which allows you to sit for the bar without having a JD.
Title: Re: Life as a 2L
Post by: Burning Sands, Esq. on August 29, 2007, 02:33:50 PM
Planet Law School is the book you're thinking of, Sands.

And I think CA is the only state which allows you to sit for the bar without having a JD.

Planet Law School is definitely one of them, but I picked this up somewhere else too.

And that's why CA has the lowest bar passage rate!



Agreed.  But what bugs me is that we're just conforming to that.  No one is really trying to break the mold.  We all just kinda fall in line with it. 

don't think there's too much that can be changed about it at this point.  it is what it is.
Title: Re: Life as a 2L
Post by: jd06 on August 29, 2007, 02:41:17 PM
And that's why CA has the lowest bar passage rate!

Exactly.  That little fact is almost always overlooked.  While I'm proud to have passed what many call "the toughest bar in the nation," in reality, if you check our first-time pass rates for ABA students (particularly from in-state ABA schools) we're right there w/ the rest of the country at around 70%.  And, hell, it can't be that tough -we've got about 211,000 lawyers  ;)
Title: Re: Life as a 2L
Post by: Burning Sands, Esq. on August 30, 2007, 05:52:36 AM
And I think CA is the only state which allows you to sit for the bar without having a JD.

FWIW, Vermont, New York, Washington, Virginia, California, Maine, and Wyoming will let you sit for the bar without going to law school.

That's almost true for New York.  New York will allow you to sit for the bar without a JD, but you can't skip going to law school.  New York requires that if you don't have a JD, then you must have successfully completed at least one year of law school and then worked under a licensed NY attorney for an additional 3 years after the one year of law school for a total of 4 years.

So its either (i) go to law school and get the JD on the traditional 3 year path or (ii) go to law school for 1 year and work for a lawyer on the 4 year path, but either way you gotta go to law school.

Title: Re: Life as a 2L
Post by: cui bono? on August 30, 2007, 08:05:20 AM
Agreed.  But what bugs me is that we're just conforming to that.  No one is really trying to break the mold.  We all just kinda fall in line with it. 

don't think there's too much that can be changed about it at this point.  it is what it is.


Couldn't disagree more. Granted, I only went thru 1 year and am prolly still in that "idealistic" stage.  But  the cycle just continues.  How many legal mentors are there out there for 1Ls?  Not many as compared to attorneys.  And black ppl, despite the fact that all of us know that we're few in #, buy into the same elitist attitudes as the larger culture. Anyone that makes it should have 2-3 mentees.  *off the soapbox*  
Title: Re: Life as a 2L
Post by: jd06 on August 30, 2007, 09:29:56 AM
Agreed.  But what bugs me is that we're just conforming to that.  No one is really trying to break the mold.  We all just kinda fall in line with it. 

don't think there's too much that can be changed about it at this point.  it is what it is.


Couldn't disagree more. Granted, I only went thru 1 year and am prolly still in that "idealistic" stage.  But  the cycle just continues.  How many legal mentors are there out there for 1Ls?  Not many as compared to attorneys.  And black ppl, despite the fact that all of us know that we're few in #, buy into the same elitist attitudes as the larger culture. Anyone that makes it should have 2-3 mentees.  *off the soapbox*  

I'm with you cui bono.  I think you'll be surprised when you start practicing how much influence you can have, at least on the local level.  Unfortunately, many attorneys are just "too busy" to help those following in their footsteps.  I'm currently volunteering at my alma mater as a "graduate mentor" doing what I can to help others make the most of their opportunity.  Many are people of color.  Hell, I'm a conservative white guy born and raised in Orange County and even I can see the need.  Good people like you and 'Sands do have the ability to go back and make a difference.  You really do.  That's part of what's great about being an officer of the court.  OK, that's all I'm gonna say about that.  *Off my soapbox as well*   ;)     





Title: Re: Life as a 2L
Post by: Burning Sands, Esq. on August 30, 2007, 09:30:50 AM
And I think CA is the only state which allows you to sit for the bar without having a JD.

FWIW, Vermont, New York, Washington, Virginia, California, Maine, and Wyoming will let you sit for the bar without a JD.

Fixed.

(http://www.bized.co.uk/images/thumbsup.jpg)
Title: Re: Life as a 2L
Post by: cui bono? on August 30, 2007, 10:45:49 AM
Agreed.  But what bugs me is that we're just conforming to that.  No one is really trying to break the mold.  We all just kinda fall in line with it. 

don't think there's too much that can be changed about it at this point.  it is what it is.


Couldn't disagree more. Granted, I only went thru 1 year and am prolly still in that "idealistic" stage.  But  the cycle just continues.  How many legal mentors are there out there for 1Ls?  Not many as compared to attorneys.  And black ppl, despite the fact that all of us know that we're few in #, buy into the same elitist attitudes as the larger culture. Anyone that makes it should have 2-3 mentees.  *off the soapbox*  

I'm with you cui bono.  I think you'll be surprised when you start practicing how much influence you can have, at least on the local level.  Unfortunately, many attorneys are just "too busy" to help those following in their footsteps.  I'm currently volunteering at my alma mater as a "graduate mentor" doing what I can to help others make the most of their opportunity.  Many are people of color.  Hell, I'm a conservative white guy born and raised in Orange County and even I can see the need.  Good people like you and 'Sands do have the ability to go back and make a difference.  You really do.  That's part of what's great about being an officer of the court.  OK, that's all I'm gonna say about that.  *Off my soapbox as well*   ;)     



 Thanks  :) :). *...back on the soapbox  :D*   See my problem is also with ppl in LS not just attorneys.  A big firm down here has a mentoring program putting students with attorneys and judges -  lotta folks sign up but never show up.    But my thing is with 2Ls and 3Ls, particularly minority students, they should be looking out for the 1Ls.  At least making themselves available.  I'm so greatful for folks like Sands, SMU, etc. because w/o them I wouldn't really have anyone telling me the real deal about LS.   I just don't get it:  Because I struggled with law school, getting in & being in (particularly as a first semester 1L), is why I want to help other folks out-  they shouldn't have to struggle if I already did. Why is there not more of a "community" focus?  Some of black folks (& everyone else as well) at my school & @ others were FAR more interested in themselves than in bringing everyone up (LOL, u can tell how popular I was, huh? :D  j/k ).  Don't they get that if one black person (or other minority) benefits, we all do?!  Like if one "minority" person in my school booked a class I was happy not "hating".  Like there are things that can be done to help someone else out that you can't exactly put on a resume.  Most ppl, if you can't put it on a resume, they won't do it

*temporarily off the soapbox  ;)*
Title: Re: Life as a 2L
Post by: blk_reign on August 30, 2007, 10:46:40 AM
are u a student member of your local bar association?
Title: Re: Life as a 2L
Post by: cui bono? on August 30, 2007, 10:51:01 AM
are u a student member of your local bar association?

who me?  yes I was.
Title: Re: Life as a 2L
Post by: Burning Sands, Esq. on August 30, 2007, 11:49:06 AM
This is all fine and dandy, but doesn't change the fact that our profession walks hand in hand with elitism.  I think it's human nature more than anything and the law just happens to be one particular stage where it is played out for others to see.  It just seems to be in our DNA as humans to want to separate "us" from "them."  Like I said, it just kinda is what it is.

Title: Re: Life as a 2L
Post by: cui bono? on August 30, 2007, 01:18:15 PM
This is all fine and dandy, but doesn't change the fact that our profession walks hand in hand with elitism.  I think it's human nature more than anything and the law just happens to be one particular stage where it is played out for others to see.  It just seems to be in our DNA as humans to want to separate "us" from "them."  Like I said, it just kinda is what it is.



surprised you of all ppl would say "it is what it is".  You tend to look out.  agreed with the us vs. them thing.  But this profession doesn't have to go hand and hand with elitism.  There's a general trend that schools insist on a pro bono requirement to graduate. 

I think the elitist attitude particularly in the black community sets us back a bit.   And if one of us makes it that we do have a duty to extend that hand back.  Plus I think a lot of LS students don't realize that extending that hand also benefits them because you never know who's watching.   
Title: Re: Life as a 2L
Post by: Burning Sands, Esq. on August 30, 2007, 01:52:10 PM
Don't think that I condone the sh!t. All I'm saying is that it's been around since the "Talented Tenth" days and even before that.  Even when we finally started matriculating to all black colleges in the late 1800's/early 1900's we still had brown paper bag tests administered by us to us in order to gain admittance into the elite fraternal organizations on the yard - separating the privileged blacks from the non-privileged blacks.  Law school is the same sh!t, different third tier toilet. :P
Title: Re: Life as a 2L
Post by: cui bono? on September 04, 2007, 10:04:48 AM
Don't think that I condone the sh!t. All I'm saying is that it's been around since the "Talented Tenth" days and even before that.  Even when we finally started matriculating to all black colleges in the late 1800's/early 1900's we still had brown paper bag tests administered by us to us in order to gain admittance into the elite fraternal organizations on the yard - separating the privileged blacks from the non-privileged blacks.  Law school is the same sh!t, different third tier toilet. :P

LOL, I know you don't condone it. Don't have to even go that far back with the paper bag test...try our parents' day. But I dunno it just seems like we see each other has competition when they're are plenty of other folk to worry 'bout.  But it was my dumb naive butt that thought the "crabs in the barrel" mentality was out the window in LS.  I experienced it as a 1L and now some of my mentees are going thru the same thing.
Title: Re: Life as a 2L
Post by: TruOne on September 04, 2007, 05:23:17 PM

LOL, I know you don't condone it. Don't have to even go that far back with the paper bag test...try our parents' day. But I dunno it just seems like we see each other has competition when they're are plenty of other folk to worry 'bout.  But it was my dumb naive butt that thought the "crabs in the barrel" mentality was out the window in LS.  I experienced it as a 1L and now some of my mentees are going thru the same thing.

Anytime you deal w/ Black Folx you have to worry about "crabs in the barrel". Why do you think we can't ever get anything accomplished? Because everyobdy wants to be "The One". The one special negro that made it to the top of the pile that Masta looks to when he is bestoying his good favor.

I ain't messin' w/ black folx next year. I'm gonna join the Federalist or Jewish Law Student Association. At least Dues would be paid on time!
Title: Re: Life as a 2L
Post by: cui bono? on September 05, 2007, 07:09:41 AM

LOL, I know you don't condone it. Don't have to even go that far back with the paper bag test...try our parents' day. But I dunno it just seems like we see each other has competition when they're are plenty of other folk to worry 'bout.  But it was my dumb naive butt that thought the "crabs in the barrel" mentality was out the window in LS.  I experienced it as a 1L and now some of my mentees are going thru the same thing.

Anytime you deal w/ Black Folx you have to worry about "crabs in the barrel". Why do you think we can't ever get anything accomplished? Because everyobdy wants to be "The One". The one special negro that made it to the top of the pile that Masta looks to when he is bestoying his good favor.

I ain't messin' w/ black folx next year. I'm gonna join the Federalist or Jewish Law Student Association. At least Dues would be paid on time!

LMAO.  u are a hot mess.  :D :D  But u aint never lied. Folks from APALSA had my back more than the local chapter of BLSA.  And I wasn't even a member of APALSA! I just helped 'em out a few times. The black folk- 2nd semester the real personalities came out. 

So I'm really not sure how to advise my mentees.  I don't want to discourage them but at the same time I'd rather they didn't form too many "close friendships" now in the 1st semester.  I've said just "be cool" with everyone but just know that folks may change the second semester around February/March.
Title: Re: Life as a 2L
Post by: cui bono? on September 05, 2007, 08:03:19 AM
 I though I should clarify just in case any 0Ls/1Ls see this, I'm not speaking ill of BLSA as an organization.  Regionally and Nationally...def on point, for the most part.  But locally, left much to be desired. It's not the case at every local BLSA chapter.  Some chapters are actually really close-knit and are active in the community.  But the nature of the chapter is something that's not apparent right away.  What I am discouraging is forming "friendships" right away with ppl because you may be disappointed in the 2nd semester.   
Title: Re: Life as a 2L
Post by: TruOne on September 05, 2007, 10:51:27 AM
I though I should clarify just in case any 0Ls/1Ls see this, I'm not speaking ill of BLSA as an organization.  Regionally and Nationally...def on point, for the most part.  But locally, left much to be desired. It's not the case at every local BLSA chapter.  Some chapters are actually really close-knit and are active in the community.  But the nature of the chapter is something that's not apparent right away.  What I am discouraging is forming "friendships" right away with ppl because you may be disappointed in the 2nd semester.   

I though I should clarify just in case any 0Ls/1Ls see this, I REALLY AM speaking ill of BLSA as an organization. National and Regional Chapter got some issues as far as communicating information. I love my Chapter, we got our Mentor/Mentee Program and we're active on campus.

How much help do we receive from Regional or National? NONE, I wonder why we gotta pay them so much in dues.

I repeat! This is some Amway-type husslin' going on!

Next year I'm runnin' for a position on the Regional Board. Cuz we get left out of the loop on too much.
Title: Re: Life as a 2L
Post by: Burning Sands, Esq. on September 05, 2007, 11:54:44 AM
I though I should clarify just in case any 0Ls/1Ls see this, I'm not speaking ill of BLSA as an organization.  Regionally and Nationally...def on point, for the most part.  But locally, left much to be desired. It's not the case at every local BLSA chapter.  Some chapters are actually really close-knit and are active in the community.  But the nature of the chapter is something that's not apparent right away.  What I am discouraging is forming "friendships" right away with ppl because you may be disappointed in the 2nd semester.   

I though I should clarify just in case any 0Ls/1Ls see this, I REALLY AM speaking ill of BLSA as an organization. National and Regional Chapter got some issues as far as communicating information. I love my Chapter, we got our Mentor/Mentee Program and we're active on campus.

How much help do we receive from Regional or National? NONE, I wonder why we gotta pay them so much in dues.

I repeat! This is some Amway-type husslin' going on!

Next year I'm runnin' for a position on the Regional Board. Cuz we get left out of the loop on too much.


Whoa-ty!!!!  Drive slow, homie.  That's a pretty wide sweeping allegation don't ya think?


Title: Re: Life as a 2L
Post by: cui bono? on September 05, 2007, 12:05:25 PM
I though I should clarify just in case any 0Ls/1Ls see this, I'm not speaking ill of BLSA as an organization.  Regionally and Nationally...def on point, for the most part.  But locally, left much to be desired. It's not the case at every local BLSA chapter.  Some chapters are actually really close-knit and are active in the community.  But the nature of the chapter is something that's not apparent right away.  What I am discouraging is forming "friendships" right away with ppl because you may be disappointed in the 2nd semester.   

I though I should clarify just in case any 0Ls/1Ls see this, I REALLY AM speaking ill of BLSA as an organization.

whaddya mean?  Don't take this year's National Convention into account. It was not run well and the second day of plenary was just tacky.   :-X So you all asked for help from Regionals and nationals and they didn't help you?  Well, SRBLSA has a fund that gives local chapters money if they want to do a project that's a lil' expensive...provided that the chapter donated $ in the past.   I dunno for sure but I don't think SRBLSA is the only entity that has something like that.  Yeah go ahead and run but DO NOT write ill of the organization up on here if that's what you're planning to do.  It WILL come up. 

Okay, about the information not being communicated...yeah I saw that at Nationals but it was among National board members.  Some of the members kinda conveniently left stuff out/dismissed vital info during the segment of plenary where they gave their reports.  But that was only a few ppl so are you sure that your local secretary properly disseminated the info that Regionals and Nationals handed down? 
Title: Re: Life as a 2L
Post by: One Step Ahead on September 05, 2007, 12:37:05 PM
I though I should clarify just in case any 0Ls/1Ls see this, I'm not speaking ill of BLSA as an organization.  Regionally and Nationally...def on point, for the most part.  But locally, left much to be desired. It's not the case at every local BLSA chapter.  Some chapters are actually really close-knit and are active in the community.  But the nature of the chapter is something that's not apparent right away.  What I am discouraging is forming "friendships" right away with ppl because you may be disappointed in the 2nd semester.   

I though I should clarify just in case any 0Ls/1Ls see this, I REALLY AM speaking ill of BLSA as an organization. National and Regional Chapter got some issues as far as communicating information. I love my Chapter, we got our Mentor/Mentee Program and we're active on campus.

How much help do we receive from Regional or National? NONE, I wonder why we gotta pay them so much in dues.
I repeat! This is some Amway-type husslin' going on!


Next year I'm runnin' for a position on the Regional Board. Cuz we get left out of the loop on too much.

yup wondered that myself.
Title: Re: Life as a 2L
Post by: TruOne on September 05, 2007, 04:28:14 PM

whaddya mean?  Don't take this year's National Convention into account. It was not run well and the second day of plenary was just tacky.   :-X So you all asked for help from Regionals and nationals and they didn't help you?  Well, SRBLSA has a fund that gives local chapters money if they want to do a project that's a lil' expensive...provided that the chapter donated $ in the past.   I dunno for sure but I don't think SRBLSA is the only entity that has something like that.  Yeah go ahead and run but DO NOT write ill of the organization up on here if that's what you're planning to do.  It WILL come up. 

Okay, about the information not being communicated...yeah I saw that at Nationals but it was among National board members.  Some of the members kinda conveniently left stuff out/dismissed vital info during the segment of plenary where they gave their reports.  But that was only a few ppl so are you sure that your local secretary properly disseminated the info that Regionals and Nationals handed down? 


See! I think this is a problem. I've gotten more relevant information from this website than I have from any Regional Director or anybody sittin' on the National Board. The problem is that we don't find out information unless we perform the due diligence and find out ourselves. Case in point: I had to find out from another member about BLSA's Job Fair Conference. Communication has not been very effective this year.
Title: Re: Life as a 2L
Post by: cui bono? on September 05, 2007, 04:41:20 PM

whaddya mean?  Don't take this year's National Convention into account. It was not run well and the second day of plenary was just tacky.   :-X So you all asked for help from Regionals and nationals and they didn't help you?  Well, SRBLSA has a fund that gives local chapters money if they want to do a project that's a lil' expensive...provided that the chapter donated $ in the past.   I dunno for sure but I don't think SRBLSA is the only entity that has something like that.  Yeah go ahead and run but DO NOT write ill of the organization up on here if that's what you're planning to do.  It WILL come up. 

Okay, about the information not being communicated...yeah I saw that at Nationals but it was among National board members.  Some of the members kinda conveniently left stuff out/dismissed vital info during the segment of plenary where they gave their reports.  But that was only a few ppl so are you sure that your local secretary properly disseminated the info that Regionals and Nationals handed down? 


See! I think this is a problem. I've gotten more relevant information from this website than I have from any Regional Director or anybody sittin' on the National Board. The problem is that we don't find out information unless we perform the due diligence and find out ourselves. Case in point: I had to find out from another member about BLSA's Job Fair Conference. Communication has not been very effective this year.

WOW, I'm dumb cause I didn't even realize you were in the southern region until I looked at the siggy.  Well, Brian Baptiste is the SRBLSA Chair.  With him, I seriously doubt any retardness will go down.  He's a cool dude. He ran the SRBLSA Convention.  I'd suggest sending him a direct email about your concerns.  He'll actually give you some insight on how to run for a position that's pretty useful if you're serious about that.  I could send you an example of the letter of intent.

We do have/ have had some Regional board/National board BLSA members on BLSD.  There's a regional chair on here now and the past year's national cochair of ed on BLSD.     

Were you at plenary this year- either for regionals or nationals?



whaddya mean?  Don't take this year's National Convention into account. It was not run well and the second day of plenary was just tacky.   :-X So you all asked for help from Regionals and nationals and they didn't help you?  Well, SRBLSA has a fund that gives local chapters money if they want to do a project that's a lil' expensive...provided that the chapter donated $ in the past.   I dunno for sure but I don't think SRBLSA is the only entity that has something like that.  Yeah go ahead and run but DO NOT write ill of the organization up on here if that's what you're planning to do.  It WILL come up. 

Okay, about the information not being communicated...yeah I saw that at Nationals but it was among National board members.  Some of the members kinda conveniently left stuff out/dismissed vital info during the segment of plenary where they gave their reports.  But that was only a few ppl so are you sure that your local secretary properly disseminated the info that Regionals and Nationals handed down? 


The problem is that we don't find out information unless we perform the due diligence and find out ourselves. 

LOL that seems to be the theme of LS.  Everything in LS. 

I didn't know about the Job Conference until I spoke directly to Brian Baptiste and the past National AG.
Again, the national convention wasn't done well and that seems to be a reflection of some personal drama on that level.
Title: Re: Life as a 2L
Post by: Burning Sands, Esq. on September 06, 2007, 07:44:13 AM

whaddya mean?  Don't take this year's National Convention into account. It was not run well and the second day of plenary was just tacky.   :-X So you all asked for help from Regionals and nationals and they didn't help you?  Well, SRBLSA has a fund that gives local chapters money if they want to do a project that's a lil' expensive...provided that the chapter donated $ in the past.   I dunno for sure but I don't think SRBLSA is the only entity that has something like that.  Yeah go ahead and run but DO NOT write ill of the organization up on here if that's what you're planning to do.  It WILL come up. 

Okay, about the information not being communicated...yeah I saw that at Nationals but it was among National board members.  Some of the members kinda conveniently left stuff out/dismissed vital info during the segment of plenary where they gave their reports.  But that was only a few ppl so are you sure that your local secretary properly disseminated the info that Regionals and Nationals handed down? 


See! I think this is a problem. I've gotten more relevant information from this website than I have from any Regional Director or anybody sittin' on the National Board. The problem is that we don't find out information unless we perform the due diligence and find out ourselves. Case in point: I had to find out from another member about BLSA's Job Fair Conference. Communication has not been very effective this year.

But in all fairness, the people on this website who you've been getting info from ARE the people on the regional and national boards.
Title: Re: Life as a 2L
Post by: cui bono? on September 06, 2007, 07:59:09 AM

whaddya mean?  Don't take this year's National Convention into account. It was not run well and the second day of plenary was just tacky.   :-X So you all asked for help from Regionals and nationals and they didn't help you?  Well, SRBLSA has a fund that gives local chapters money if they want to do a project that's a lil' expensive...provided that the chapter donated $ in the past.   I dunno for sure but I don't think SRBLSA is the only entity that has something like that.  Yeah go ahead and run but DO NOT write ill of the organization up on here if that's what you're planning to do.  It WILL come up. 

Okay, about the information not being communicated...yeah I saw that at Nationals but it was among National board members.  Some of the members kinda conveniently left stuff out/dismissed vital info during the segment of plenary where they gave their reports.  But that was only a few ppl so are you sure that your local secretary properly disseminated the info that Regionals and Nationals handed down? 


See! I think this is a problem. I've gotten more relevant information from this website than I have from any Regional Director or anybody sittin' on the National Board. The problem is that we don't find out information unless we perform the due diligence and find out ourselves. Case in point: I had to find out from another member about BLSA's Job Fair Conference. Communication has not been very effective this year.

But in all fairness, the people on this website who you've been getting info from ARE the people on the regional and national boards.


I'm dont think he realizes who's who  ;).  BUT, he's right that isn't exactly "fair". Why should he have to come on here to get the info?  Some of this stuff should be reflected in the newsletter or other forms.   I got the info because I just so happen to know you, the SRBLSA Chair, and the former National AG personally.  Now in my situation. that was a reflection of the lack of communication among my own retarded azz chapter. Whole bunch of info was not disseminated until I got the info and disseminated it myself or told the e-board they better disseminate it b4 I did  :D.  But btw the three of ya'll, I got all the info I needed.  Certainly participating in plenary helped too.  I do think that the decisions made in plenary should be made known to the general body.  Even those in other regions...sooner than they are.  I brought back each decision made in plenary back to my chapter..I wrote up everything, the issues, who had a prob with what, which school spoke at which time and on which issue so that my chapter would know who were the movers and shakers so that maybe we could have a joint-effort in some future program.  But they wouldn't have known had I not done that.     
Title: Re: Life as a 2L
Post by: TruOne on September 09, 2007, 04:34:39 PM
I'm dont think he realizes who's who  ;).  BUT, he's right that isn't exactly "fair". Why should he have to come on here to get the info?  Some of this stuff should be reflected in the newsletter or other forms.   I got the info because I just so happen to know you, the SRBLSA Chair, and the former National AG personally.  Now in my situation. that was a reflection of the lack of communication among my own retarded azz chapter. Whole bunch of info was not disseminated until I got the info and disseminated it myself or told the e-board they better disseminate it b4 I did  :D.  But btw the three of ya'll, I got all the info I needed.  Certainly participating in plenary helped too.  I do think that the decisions made in plenary should be made known to the general body.  Even those in other regions...sooner than they are.  I brought back each decision made in plenary back to my chapter..I wrote up everything, the issues, who had a prob with what, which school spoke at which time and on which issue so that my chapter would know who were the movers and shakers so that maybe we could have a joint-effort in some future program.  But they wouldn't have known had I not done that.     


Whoa. . .we have a newsletter?
Title: Re: Life as a 2L
Post by: cui bono? on September 10, 2007, 04:06:47 PM
I dunno exactly if it's called a "newsletter" per se but there's something given to the secretary of the chapter and the chapter is responsible for funneling it. 

Seriously, I think you should address Brian Baptiste with your concerns. He's the Southern Regional Chair. 

So you haven't received anything from Regionals or Nationals?  Did you receive something in your school email about running for positions either regionally or nationally?   

I take it that you didn't go to Nationals this past year b/c you'd prolly say something.   Man lemme tell you, was not run well AT ALL.  They had like 2 meals.  Didn't let ppl know that meals were not included (I knew 'cause of Baptiste & the AG).  "Drink tickets" (yes dammit I'm still bitter  :D).  Folks in plenary were acting a damn fool-  completely unprofessional on the 2nd day.  Definitely a break down in communication there, so I feel you on that one.  I think it's inappropriate to show that side of the organization to the 1Ls - would have been a turn off to me if I didn't see how it should have been done (like at SRBLSA convention) first. 

Regionals on the other hand was run very well.  Meals included.  Plenary was run professionally. Only drawback was that there wasn't a lot of folks at the community service event- mostly due to conflict in schedule. Oh- that and there were not a lot of ppl available to be judges or bailiffs for the competitions.  BTW, you can get pro bono cred for acting as a bailiff-  do the "hear ye, hear ye" and time both sides. 

I think you should become a delegate this year at the Conventions.  Just ask the local e-board if they'll let you.  They prolly will b/c most folks find it boring to sit there all day-  and it does last all day.    I had fun though; got to see how stuff works and who's responsible for what.  And as my mentor always says "the power is not in the hands of the officers but with the ppl". 
Title: Re: Life as a 2L
Post by: iman on September 10, 2007, 08:53:47 PM
i'm not trying to be offensive, but tru-one, did you ever think that  you're not getting relevant information b/c your local chapter is not passing it on? our region has a blsa presidents email list. are you the blsa president? if not, maybe you should ask your blsa president if they get emails from the various regional and national chairs. Also, if you're on facebook, you can join the various groups for your region. and if that fails, you can also just go to the NBLSA website and sign up for the mailing list. i've pasted the website below for your convenience. i have at least 50 emails in my email account from the NBLSA listserv over the past 2 years. whenever i hear people hating on nblsa or their regional board in terms of communication--it always seems like they haven't even taken the first step to finding anything out. granted the past immediate communications person was not very prolific, but still you definitely knew when the job fairs and regional conventions were taking place. getting those emails/information is just as simple as going to the website. and i'm another one of the fmr. regional board members.

http://www.nblsa.org/news/mailinglist.html (http://www.nblsa.org/news/mailinglist.html)
Title: Re: Life as a 2L
Post by: cui bono? on September 10, 2007, 10:26:17 PM
i'm not trying to be offensive, but tru-one, did you ever think that  you're not getting relevant information b/c your local chapter is not passing it on?

Yeah I mentioned that.  That was the problem in my chapter.  But honestly tho, judging from the NBLSA Convention there was a serious breakdown in communication among board members and with board members tothe general body.  But yeah it's more than likely the local chapter.
Title: Re: Life as a 2L
Post by: Burning Sands, Esq. on September 11, 2007, 11:19:20 AM
Not to make any excuses for any of the board members, but it is important to keep in mind that these are law students just like everybody else.  It would be a different story if they were paid professionals and conference planners or what have you. But that's not quite the case.
Title: Re: Life as a 2L
Post by: cui bono? on September 11, 2007, 07:10:09 PM
See I'm on the fence about that.  Granted all LS students are busy so we shouldn't expect miracles but on the other hand, no one forced them into the positions that they took on.  If they couldn't do the job then they need to have the integrity to step aside so that someone can do the job.   

On any level, I'm annoyed by ppl that take positions solely b/c they think it would boost their resume.  Particularly in an org like BLSA, folks need to understand that all positions on every level are positions of service.  It becomes clear who did it for what reason.  And I think it hurts the 1Ls and helping them is a part of what the org's all about, IMHO. 
Title: Re: Life as a 2L
Post by: Young Esq. on November 29, 2007, 06:47:59 PM
 ;)  You never know who is watching...

[Ok now back to the real world lol]
Title: Re: Life as a 2L
Post by: cui bono? on November 29, 2007, 08:54:39 PM
;)  You never know who is watching...

[Ok now back to the real world lol]

YOUNG!!!  wassup babes how u been?  :)
Title: Re: Life as a 2L
Post by: A. on November 30, 2007, 07:45:07 PM
I'm starting to get annoyed at how they keep making our salaries, perks, and trade-offs front-page news:

A Mixed Blessing for Aspiring Lawyers
High Tuition and Debt Lure Graduates Toward High Pay, Away from Public Service Jobs

By Ian Shapira
Washington Post Staff Writer
Friday, November 30, 2007; A01

For months, Beirne Roose-Snyder has struggled with what she will do after graduating from Georgetown University Law Center. Should she accept the $145,000-a-year offer from a Chicago firm? Or should she gamble and look for a potentially more satisfying public interest job? She and her husband are plowing through some Wok N' Roll takeout in their cramped District basement apartment as they ponder her choice. The deadline is Dec. 1.

"In some ways, I am more afraid of the law firm," says Adam Keller, 28, a Fairfax County teacher. "If you thrive at the firm, I would like you a lot less because you'd be a different person."

Roose-Snyder, 26, smiles. "I think it would reinforce a part of my personality that neither of us like very much," she replies. "The Type A, traditional, ambitious person . . . in a power suit."

Even the most privileged paths come with choices. For Roose-Snyder and other young strivers on the verge of entering the professional world, these decisions can test their values in deep ways for the first time in their lives. In Washington, home to prestigious law firms, government agencies and public interest organizations, the options pose stark contrasts.

Roose-Snyder's situation might be extreme for the amount of money at stake, but many graduates in law and other fields face similar decisions. Consider MBA students torn between Wall Street or a small start-up. Or medical students deciding between family practice or more lucrative specialties such as radiology or orthopedics.

A public service job in global health, Roose-Snyder's passion, would appeal to her Quaker faith. But a position with a brand-name corporate law firm would help erase her and her husband's graduate school debts, help nail down the fundamentals of the field and, perhaps most dear to the couple, offset the cost of adopting a first child. She also is drawn intellectually to the challenge of representing influential clients.

As the deadline nears, Roose-Snyder flip-flops like an undecided juror. She does not take the money for granted and recognizes others would be grateful for the offer. But, she says: "I'm overwhelmed. I just need to make a decision. I really want this to be over."

Although her quandary is familiar in the legal world, the factors that make those high law firm salaries so alluring are intensifying. Law school tuition and student debt keep rising, trade associations report, and the gap between public interest and law firm salaries is widening.

In the land of marble floors and dark wood paneling, veteran lawyers and young associates consider the huge salaries a mixed blessing.

"We don't mind paying the market rate for associates, but we do have some concern that as salaries get higher, you're getting people who really don't want to work at the law firm," said Steven Schulman, a partner with Akin Gump in Washington. "Of course we want law students interested in pro bono work, but in interviews, the red flag is when they seem interested only in pro bono and are not realistic about being a commercial lawyer."

A backlash is brewing against big money and high debt. Schools are starting loan repayment programs to help students afford less lucrative jobs. Some corporate clients, including Wal-Mart, are questioning whether rising associate salaries are driving up legal fees.

Still, law firms are enticing, and not just for the money. Their offers typically arrive as third-year students prepare for the fall term. Those who accept enjoy a relaxing final year of school. Nonprofit and government agencies make offers several months later. So if a third-year prefers a Department of Justice job or a public interest fellowship but wants to keep an offer from a firm as a backup? Often, that can't happen.

"Are you going to hold off on the law firm, knowing there's a line 20 deep to take it?" asked David Stern, chief executive of Equal Justice Works, a District-based nonprofit organization that offers 50 law graduates fellowships each year that pay $37,500. "Or are you going to take the bird in hand? How do you hold out? You have to have nerves of steel."

One night early this month, Roose-Snyder and Keller are debating the options in their Columbia Heights apartment, which is so small that an espresso maker and other wedding gift/kitchen appliances must be stored in a closet with the washer and dryer.

They lay everything out. Either Roose-Snyder takes a job with Drinker Biddle Gardner Carton, where she worked last summer, or she turns down Chicago and goes for fellowships. She's zeroing in on a $60,000-a-year fellowship at Georgetown's O'Neill Institute for National and Global Health Law, which has a March deadline. An institute official is urging her to apply and forget the firm.

The fellowship would allow her to advance a project she helped launch that examines how universities license medical research to corporations. She dreams one day of possibly working in places without LLP in the name: the World Health Organization or UNAIDS, run by the United Nations.

But the firm would help pay off the couple's school debt and give Roose-Snyder litigation and transaction experience that could open up opportunities.

"I never forget that there are brilliant people who are toiling away at other schools who can't afford to turn this job down," Roose-Snyder says, rubbing her eyes.

They open a fortune cookie. "Learn Chinese Have Money," it advises.

They start rationalizing the Drinker Biddle offer. No more long-term debt. Enough money to adopt a child. "Neither of us has the feeling that we're not parents unless the child looks like us," Roose-Snyder says.

Maybe she could put her time in at the firm for a short period? Sort of like the Peace Corps, they joke.

"Friends call it 'Corporate Corps,' " says Keller, a science teacher at Langley High School in McLean.

About 56 percent of law school graduates immediately enter private practice, according to NALP (formerly the National Association for Law Placement). Fourteen percent go into business. Twenty-two percent enter government, and 5 percent work for a public interest organization or an advocacy practice such as Legal Aid.

The American Bar Association reports that the average amount private law school students borrowed in 2005-06 reached about $83,200; the total was about $54,500 for those in public law schools. The median starting salary for lawyers at non-governmental or public interest organizations is $40,000, according to NALP, and for those in government, $48,000. For private practice lawyers, the median is $95,000. This year, first-year associate salaries at some firms reached $160,000, partners say. That's not counting bonuses.

Some, especially those in schools with generous financial aid, can say no.

"I decided to turn it down. Why? I wanted a hands-on job in prosecution. You get better hands-on training up front," said Prince George's County native Andrew Canter, a third-year student at Stanford Law School who helped start a group called Building a Better Legal Profession. The group ranks firms based on required billable hours and the amount of pro bono work, an attraction for those who feel guilty about avoiding that Legal Aid job.

In mid-November, over beer with friends at a bar near the law campus, just off Capitol Hill, Roose-Snyder announces she has been scanning the Internet for condominiums in Chicago. Nothing too fancy. She's looking for a two-bedroom place, near public transportation -- maybe something with exposed brick walls? Besides, she says, not all the firm's clients are profit-pumping corporations.

"My firm represents tons and tons of hospitals," she says, explaining her leaning. "I consider that helping the public good."

Her friend Shai Kalansky, 26, also a third-year, explains why he took a job at the corporate law firm where he worked during the summer. "I think about the people I met. I reflect on the experience. It's about the people," says Kalansky, clad in a dark hooded sweat shirt that bore the firm's name.

"I really like that hoodie," Roose-Snyder says.

With a couple of weeks before deadline, Roose-Snyder and Keller are cooking chicken on the George Foreman grill, and she is nearing a decision. There's a new development. The O'Neill Institute is likely to give her academic credit to research a possibly groundbreaking paper. It would examine how universities can license medical research to pharmaceutical companies to help people in developing countries access lifesaving drugs.

Roose-Snyder reasons that if a prominent health-law journal publishes her research, she would feel more comfortable taking the Chicago job. The firm would give her mentorship and a sense of how the profession works. And if she wanted a public interest job down the line, a published paper could make her an attractive candidate.

"I'll make sure if we buy a condo that it would be a mortgage we could afford if I left the firm at some point later," she says. She pulls out the offer letter and inks the deal. After sealing the envelope, she raises her left arm in a gesture that says, What else can I do?

"Well," Keller says, laughing. "Don't look at me."

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/11/29/AR2007112902494.html?hpid=sec-education
Title: Re: Life as a 2L
Post by: El_Che on December 01, 2007, 10:28:18 AM
what a tough decision, are we meant to feel sorry for her? I'm sure anyone would kill to have her "problem"!
Title: Re: Life as a 2L
Post by: GoldenAfro on December 01, 2007, 10:30:29 AM
Yeah, it's like people choosing between Harvard, Yale, Stanford.

Poor you. Cut the crap, and make a decision.  ::)
Title: Re: Life as a 2L
Post by: Young Esq. on December 07, 2007, 12:07:50 PM
;)  You never know who is watching...

[Ok now back to the real world lol]

YOUNG!!!  wassup babes how u been?  :)

Life is good. Over here knocking out these finals
Title: Re: Life as a 2L
Post by: cui bono? on December 09, 2007, 05:05:23 PM
;)  You never know who is watching...

[Ok now back to the real world lol]

YOUNG!!!  wassup babes how u been?  :)

Life is good. Over here knocking out these finals

 :) :-*   good luck man