Law School Discussion

Specific Groups => Minority and Non-Traditional Law Students => Topic started by: Socraotes on October 15, 2006, 06:01:52 AM

Title: Becoming Native American in the Eyes of the US Government
Post by: Socraotes on October 15, 2006, 06:01:52 AM
So my great grandmother is Black Foot. Is it possible for me to file the papers to be considered Black Foot or is it lost to me because my grandmother and mother did not file the papers? Thanks!
Title: Re: Becoming Native American in the Eyes of the US Government
Post by: redemption on October 15, 2006, 12:31:33 PM
 LongStandingBearChief@blackfoot.org
Title: Re: Becoming Native American in the Eyes of the US Government
Post by: H4CS on October 15, 2006, 12:37:03 PM
omg my great grandmother was an Indian princess too!  BFF!
Title: Re: Becoming Native American in the Eyes of the US Government
Post by: lindseyl on October 16, 2006, 07:27:08 AM
So my great grandmother is Black Foot. Is it possible for me to file the papers to be considered Black Foot or is it lost to me because my grandmother and mother did not file the papers? Thanks!

I have a friend going through this right now, and well, it requires photographic evidence. Weird, I know. It's really tough to prove Indian status through the US Government (unless of course you live on a reservation!).
Title: Re: Becoming Native American in the Eyes of the US Government
Post by: randylf on October 16, 2006, 06:17:13 PM
Sorry lindsey1, but I believe you are misinformed.  Living on a reservation does not make the process of proving Native American descendency any easier.  Also Socraotes, you should contact the tribal enrollment office for their procedures on how to enroll and become a legal member of that tribe.  I am not familiar with the idea of having photographic evidence to prove Native American status and I don't really understand how that would work.  This does not sound accurate.  What I am familiar with, however, is proving Native American lineage using tribal and U.S. government records of enrolled members and proving a relation to those members that were enrolled.