Law School Discussion

Specific Groups => Minority and Non-Traditional Law Students => Topic started by: ->Soon on September 11, 2006, 08:06:32 PM

Title: you go girl!
Post by: ->Soon on September 11, 2006, 08:06:32 PM
although it shouldnbt be a big event when women do anything, after all, it shouldnt matter WHAT gender does it, but it does, so lets put some encouraging news/links here.

http://www.azcentral.com/arizonarepublic/business/articles/0911biz-azw-inventors0911.html

the baby seat id was clever.  feel free to copy the entire artcile for those to lazy to go to the website to read it.
Title: Re: you go girl!
Post by: ->Soon on September 15, 2006, 07:38:57 AM
More women named to boardsA survey found that 15% of vacant seats on large Phila. corporations were being filled by women.
By Jane M. Von Bergen
Inquirer Staff Writer
Their goals haven't been met, but leaders of the Forum of Executive Women say they are heartened by an increasing number of women being added to area corporate boards.

According to a survey being released today, more than 15 percent of the vacant or new positions on the corporate boards of large Philadelphia companies were filled by women last year, up from 6.06 percent in 2004.

It was the sixth annual board survey by the Philadelphia-based group of women leaders in businesses and nonprofit organizations.

"It is certainly more positive, but we don't need to be jumping up and down yet," said Sally Stetson, cochairwoman of a Forum subcommittee that wants to place more women on corporate boards and in executive suites.

"There's still clearly lots more work to do," said Stetson, a principal in the Radnor-based Salveson Stetson Group Inc., an executive-search firm.

The Forum will present its findings this morning at its annual breakfast. University of Pennsylvania president Amy Gutmann is scheduled to speak on "Women and Power in the Knowledge Economy."

Tempering the group's optimism are other statistics drawn from the proxy-based survey of the 100 largest publicly traded companies that have either headquarters or a significant presence in the region.

The number of women in top executive positions - the pool from which board members are typically drawn - is down. The number of women who are among the top five earners in each company is also down.

Stetson said the Forum stood ready to help companies find qualified board members, either from among businesswomen in this area or through their association with similar executive groups in other cities, including Boston and Atlanta.

At this morning's breakfast, the Forum will honor three local companies that have shown a commitment to women in leadership positions.

West Pharmaceutical Services Inc., of Lionville, added two women to its board last year and now has three women on its 12-member board. Philadelphia Consolidated Holding Corp., a Philadelphia insurer, added one woman and now has three women on its 10-member board. Lincoln National Corp., a financial company with Philadelphia headquarters, added one woman, who joined three others on an 11-member board.

In addition, Campbell Soup Co. and Cigna Corp. each named a woman to a board seat.

In total, there were 38 board vacancies, of which six were filled by women, according to the survey.

Two other local companies, A.C. Moore Arts & Crafts Inc. and Penn Virginia Corp., each added a woman to their boards after the Forum's research deadline.
Title: Re: you go girl!
Post by: ->Soon on September 18, 2006, 09:12:54 AM
good news, but is it all good?

Women boost majority status at universities

Anne Ryman
The Arizona Republic
Sept. 18, 2006 12:00 AM

Women are tightening their grip on the university campus.

An increasing majority of students at Arizona's major universities are women, enrollment figures indicate. And college majors traditionally dominated by men, including architecture, law and medicine, are seeing larger percentages of women.

Women make up a majority on all three state university campuses: 53 percent at Arizona State University and the University of Arizona, 63 percent at Northern Arizona University. advertisement 
 
NAU has large programs in nursing and education, fields dominated by women. When the latest figures for fall 2006 are released this week, university officials say they expect the increase to continue.

The trends reflect a national shift that has raised hopes for the future advancement of working women and concerns about whether too many young men are shrugging off college. The national average of college-enrolled women is 57 percent.

At UA, nearly every college reported an increased percentage of women over the past decade. More than half of the law students and 60 percent of medical students last year were women. They remain far behind in engineering and architecture, however.

Women also outperform men in graduating. U.S. Department of Education statistics show that men are less likely to get bachelor's degrees.

Theories abound as to why colleges are going female. The reasons range from the influence of baby boomer moms to the attraction of young men to blue-collar jobs.

"It's . . . more surprising if you don't go (to college)," said Hadiza Mohammed, 21, an ASU accounting major.

What it means for the future is unclear. Women likely will make up a larger percentage of careers traditionally dominated by men. Yet many still delay or downshift careers to make time for raising children. Even experts who have studied the trend hesitate to make predictions.

"The $64,000 question is: 'Will that majority grow?' " said Jacqueline King, author of a 2006 study, "Gender Equity in Higher Education."
Title: Re: you go girl!
Post by: ->Soon on September 19, 2006, 05:23:28 AM
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/14868473/site/newsweek/
Title: Re: you go girl!
Post by: ->Soon on November 08, 2006, 09:32:14 AM
1st lady speaker!

you go girl!
Title: Re: you go girl!
Post by: thestradgirl on November 08, 2006, 10:46:15 AM
Blue, are you a minority?
Title: Re: you go girl!
Post by: ->Soon on November 08, 2006, 10:47:56 AM
Blue, are you a minority?

kinda.  im a white guy thats a total freak living in the south.

and i think im the only one on earth over the age of 15 not getting any action at the moment.

so, yeah, id say i am...
Title: Re: you go girl!
Post by: ->Soon on November 08, 2006, 10:53:11 AM
a freak white guy in the South does not sound like a minority... :o

and I am so stalking you. :o

youd be surprised...

and im cool with lady stalkers...
Title: Re: you go girl!
Post by: ->Soon on November 08, 2006, 01:20:01 PM
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20061108/ap_on_el_ge/new_congress_demographics

ummm, once you ladies take charge, i hope you will remember all the nice things we guys do for you....

:)
Title: Re: you go girl!
Post by: ->Soon on December 15, 2006, 10:44:11 AM
http://www.nytimes.com/2006/12/15/nyregion/15muslim.html

that is one brave woman!
Title: Re: you go girl!
Post by: ->Soon on December 22, 2006, 05:45:03 AM
RELEASED: TUESDAY, DECEMBER 19, 2006

    * Mike Bergman
    * Public Information Office
    * (301) 763-3030/457-3670 (fax)
    * (301) 457-1037 (TDD)
    * e-mail: <pio@census.gov>

    * CB06-186


Majority of Undergrads and Grad Students Are Women,
Census Bureau Reports

     Women made up 56 percent (about 8 million) of the undergraduate student population and 59 percent (about 2 million) of the graduate students in 2005, according to the latest data released today by the U.S. Census Bureau on school enrollment in the United States.

     The package of 15 tables from the Current Population Survey (CPS) shows characteristics of the population age 3 and older enrolled in classes — from nursery school through graduate studies — as well as those in vocational training.

     Other highlights:

    * About half (49 percent) of 18- and 19-year-olds were enrolled in college in 2005.
    * The majority of undergraduate students were enrolled in four-year colleges 69 percent). Of those enrolled in four-year colleges, 81 percent attended full time.
    * Half of all graduate students (52 percent) were enrolled part time.
    * More than half of all students enrolled in vocational courses worked full time (60 percent) and of those students, more than half (56 percent) were men.
    * Of all students in vocational courses, the largest group was 45- to 64-year-olds at 29 percent, followed by 25- to 34-year-olds at 24 percent.
    * Six-in-10 4-year-olds were enrolled in preschool.

 

Title: Re: you go girl!
Post by: ->Soon on January 03, 2007, 01:36:50 PM
http://apprentice.tv.yahoo.com/trump/06/theshow/ivanka_bio.html

yeah, shes had a huge helping hand, but still, if she can make it....
Title: Re: you go girl!
Post by: pikey on January 11, 2007, 11:21:17 AM
http://apprentice.tv.yahoo.com/trump/06/theshow/ivanka_bio.html

yeah, shes had a huge helping hand, but still, if she can make it....

If she can make it, anyone whose father owns the company can.  Is that the best we can do?  >:(
Title: Re: you go girl!
Post by: ->Soon on January 11, 2007, 11:30:52 AM
http://apprentice.tv.yahoo.com/trump/06/theshow/ivanka_bio.html

yeah, shes had a huge helping hand, but still, if she can make it....

If she can make it, anyone whose father owns the company can.  Is that the best we can do?  >:(

the thread is open to all.

feel free to add positive stories  :)
Title: Re: you go girl!
Post by: ->Soon on January 26, 2007, 05:16:34 AM
When mountain lion attacks, spouse fights back
Wife clubs big cat with log after husband is attacked in California state park

SAN FRANCISCO - Wildlife officials credited a woman with saving her husband's life by clubbing a mountain lion that attacked him while the couple were hiking in a California state park.

Jim and Nell Hamm, who will celebrate their 50th wedding anniversary next month, were hiking in Prairie Creek Redwoods State Park when the lion pounced, officials said Thursday.

"He didn't scream. It was a different, horrible plea for help, and I turned around, and by then the cat had wrestled Jim to the ground," Nell Hamm said in an interview from the hospital where her husband was recovering from a torn scalp, puncture wounds and other injuries.
Story continues below ↓ advertisement

After the attack, game wardens closed the park about 320 miles north of San Francisco and released hounds to track the lion. They later shot and killed a pair of lions found near the trail where the attack happened.

The carcasses were flown to a state forensics lab to determine if either animal mauled the man.

Although the Hamms are experienced hikers, neither had seen a mountain lion before Jim Hamm was mauled, his wife said. Nell Hamm said she grabbed a four-inch-wide log and beat the animal with it, but it would not release its hold on her husband's head.

"Jim was talking to me all through this, and he said, 'I've got a pen in my pocket and get the pen and jab him in the eye,'" she said. "So I got the pen and tried to put it in his eye, but it didn't want to go in as easy as I thought it would."

When the pen bent and became useless, Nell Hamm went back to using the log. The lion eventually let go and, with blood on its snout, stood staring at the woman. She screamed and waved the log until the animal walked away.

‘She saved his life, there is no doubt’
"She saved his life, there is no doubt about it," said Steve Martarano, a spokesman for the Department of Fish and Game.

Nell Hamm, 65, said she was scared to leave her dazed, bleeding husband alone, so the couple walked a quarter-mile to a trail head, where she gathered branches to protect them if more lions came around. They waited until a ranger came by and summoned help.

"My concern was to get Jim out of there," she said. "I told him, 'Get up, get up, walk,' and he did."

Jim Hamm, 70, was in fair condition Thursday. He had to have his lips stitched back together and underwent surgery for lacerations on his head and body.

Nell Hamm warned people never to hike in the backcountry alone. Park rangers told the couple if Jim Hamm had been alone, he probably would not have survived.

"We fought harder than we ever have to save his life, and we fought together," she said.


http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/16817149/


dang!
Title: Re: you go girl!
Post by: ->Soon on February 09, 2007, 10:26:31 AM
 Reports: Harvard expected to name woman president

BOSTON, Massachusetts (AP) -- Harvard University could be about to name its first female president, as the governing board charged with vetting candidates has narrowed its search to a single one, historian Drew Gilpin Faust, according to published reports.

The Harvard Corporation was expected to recommend Faust to the school's Board of Overseers, an alumni group that has final say, at a meeting on Sunday, multiple sources told The Boston Globe and The Harvard Crimson in Friday's editions.

Both newspapers said Faust was the only remaining candidate.

"We don't comment on the search process," Harvard spokesman John Longbrake told The Associated Press early Friday.

Faust, an expert on the Civil War and the American South, has been dean of Harvard's Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study since 2001 and also teaches in the history department. She has never run a major institution and did not attend Harvard, which the university usually prefers.

Faust would succeed Lawrence Summers, a former Treasury Secretary under President Clinton, who resigned in June after a five-year tenure marked by conflicts with faculty. Summers' comments two years ago that genetic differences between the genders may explain the dearth of women in top science jobs drew sharp criticism and sparked calls from some alumni for the school to name a female president.

In January, another top candidate, Thomas R. Cech, the head of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and a Nobel prize winner, asked the search committee to remove him from consideration.

In the wake of Summers' comments about women scientists, Faust oversaw the creation of two faculty task forces that examined gender diversity at the Cambridge campus.

Faust has a bachelor's degree from Bryn Mawr College and received her doctorate from the University of Pennsylvania, where she taught for many years.

Faust declined comment through a spokesman, The Boston Globe said.






Couldnt they have picked someone hotter though?



>:D  (heehee, that should get some feminist panties bunched up!)
Title: Re: you go girl!
Post by: ->Soon on February 23, 2007, 10:16:41 AM
 Computing award goes to female for first time
AP) -- One of the most prestigious prizes in computing, the $100,000 Turing Award, went to a woman Wednesday for the first time in the award's 40-year history.

Frances E. Allen, 74, was honored for her work at IBM Corp. on techniques for optimizing the performance of compilers, the programs that translate one computer language into another.

This process is required to turn programming code into the binary zeros and ones actually read by a computer's colossal array of minuscule switches.

Allen joined IBM in 1957 after completing a master's degree in mathematics at the University of Michigan. At the time, IBM recruited women by circulating a brochure on campuses that was titled "My Fair Ladies."

When Allen joined Big Blue, an IBM team led by John Backus had just completed Fortran, one of the first high-level programming languages.

The point of Fortran was to develop a system that could operate a computer just as efficiently as previous "hand-coded" approaches directly assembled by programmers. Allen recalled Wednesday that her task at IBM was to replicate the achievement on multiple kinds of computers.

"I had the good fortune to work on one big project on good machines after another," she said.

Her work led her into varied assignments, including writing intelligence analysis software for the National Security Agency. More recently she helped design software for IBM's Blue Gene supercomputer.

She retired in 2002 but has stayed active in programs that encourage girls and women to study computer science.

"It's a very tough problem overall," she said. "Constant attention to it is important."

Since the Turing Award was first given in 1966 by the Association for Computing Machinery, previous winners have included luminaries in encryption, artificial intelligence, hypertext, networking and other vital elements of modern computing. All were men, including Backus, the 1977 winner.

Allen called it "high time for a woman," though she quickly added: "That's not why I got it."



hmmmm, not sure if i approve of the nerdification of women...
Title: Re: you go girl!
Post by: pikey on February 23, 2007, 12:33:33 PM
Computing award goes to female for first time
AP) -- One of the most prestigious prizes in computing, the $100,000 Turing Award, went to a woman Wednesday for the first time in the award's 40-year history.

Frances E. Allen, 74, was honored for her work at IBM Corp. on techniques for optimizing the performance of compilers, the programs that translate one computer language into another.

This process is required to turn programming code into the binary zeros and ones actually read by a computer's colossal array of minuscule switches.

Allen joined IBM in 1957 after completing a master's degree in mathematics at the University of Michigan. At the time, IBM recruited women by circulating a brochure on campuses that was titled "My Fair Ladies."

When Allen joined Big Blue, an IBM team led by John Backus had just completed Fortran, one of the first high-level programming languages.

The point of Fortran was to develop a system that could operate a computer just as efficiently as previous "hand-coded" approaches directly assembled by programmers. Allen recalled Wednesday that her task at IBM was to replicate the achievement on multiple kinds of computers.

"I had the good fortune to work on one big project on good machines after another," she said.

Her work led her into varied assignments, including writing intelligence analysis software for the National Security Agency. More recently she helped design software for IBM's Blue Gene supercomputer.

She retired in 2002 but has stayed active in programs that encourage girls and women to study computer science.

"It's a very tough problem overall," she said. "Constant attention to it is important."

Since the Turing Award was first given in 1966 by the Association for Computing Machinery, previous winners have included luminaries in encryption, artificial intelligence, hypertext, networking and other vital elements of modern computing. All were men, including Backus, the 1977 winner.

Allen called it "high time for a woman," though she quickly added: "That's not why I got it."



hmmmm, not sure if i approve of the nerdification of women...

I just read about her in Glamour this week.  It was an article about women in science.  Yay women's magazines!  :D
Title: Re: you go girl!
Post by: ->Soon on February 27, 2007, 06:38:45 AM
 INDIANAPOLIS · The nation's largest health insurer, WellPoint Inc., surprised some analysts with its choice for a new CEO: a lesser-known executive who will become the highest-ranking woman in the Fortune 500.

Angela F. Braly, a lawyer with deal-making experience and public-policy savvy, was tapped to take over when Larry Glasscock retires June 1. Glasscock, 58, announced his retirement Monday, citing family reasons the company would not elaborate on. He will remain non-executive chairman.

WellPoint ranked 38th in the 2006 Fortune 500 list of the largest U.S. companies. The next highest company with a female leader is No. 56 Archer Daniels Midland Co., headed by Patricia A. Woertz.

Braly, currently a WellPoint executive vice president, said she might bring "great perspective" to the new role because of her gender. She noted that women make up 77 percent of WellPoint's 42,000 employees and more than half of its management ranks.

WellPoint shares fell 37 cents to close at $81.13 in Monday trading on the New York Stock Exchange.

The company's choice came as a "major shock" to CIBC World Markets analyst Carl McDonald. "We want to emphasize that our issue is not with Braly herself, as she very well could be the perfect person for the role," McDonald wrote. "We just don't know her, and neither does the market."

There are currently 10 female CEOs leading Fortune 500 companies, a list that includes RadioShack Corp., Avon Products Inc. and Xerox Corp.

Braly, 45, joined the company in 2005. Before that, she was president and CEO of Blue Cross Blue Shield of Missouri.
Title: Re: you go girl!
Post by: ->Soon on March 15, 2007, 10:44:39 AM
im thinking this is good news...

http://www.kentucky.com/139/story/17468.html
Title: Re: you go girl!
Post by: ->Soon on March 16, 2007, 10:33:08 AM
http://www.charlotte.com/112/story/53232.html

u go girl!
Title: Re: you go girl!
Post by: LegalMatters on March 21, 2007, 09:51:52 AM
Quick note but has everyone on the thread taken a look at female enrollment at the schools they've applied to or are going to? I don't think there's a one where women aren't the minority gender.

Title: Re: you go girl!
Post by: ->Soon on March 21, 2007, 10:11:04 AM
Quick note but has everyone on the thread taken a look at female enrollment at the schools they've applied to or are going to? I don't think there's a one where women aren't the minority gender.



well, i believe its one of the few areas where men are still in the majority.

but dont worry, it wont last much longer....
Title: Re: you go girl!
Post by: LegalMatters on March 23, 2007, 11:27:21 AM
Does that mean we have to publicly admit we've already been running the world for hundreds of years? ;)
Title: Re: you go girl!
Post by: ->Soon on March 23, 2007, 11:28:55 AM
well, I havent (yet), so no...
Title: Re: you go girl!
Post by: ->Soon on March 26, 2007, 08:13:41 AM
http://www.tennessean.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070324/NEWS01/703240372/1006/NEWS01


ummm, this one is more for me   ;D
Title: Re: you go girl!
Post by: LegalMatters on March 26, 2007, 09:14:42 AM
At the risk of sounding catty, I still haven't heard a valid argument for beauty pageants to continue. But I've heard a new term emerge recently for organizers to legitimize them: Scholarship contests.

And will someone please explain to me how strutting around a stage in a bathing suit is the better way to judge physical fitness than say, making the entrants run a 50 meter race?

The contests are basically public purity tests - if you're pretty and pure, you get money and fame. Whoa to you if you had an indiscretion somewhere in your past. I guess I can sort of see some sort of positive effects if it boosts a woman's low self-esteem, the poise part I agree with, but overall it's a joke.
Title: Re: you go girl!
Post by: ->Soon on April 02, 2007, 03:42:46 PM
Female state lawmakers are moving into leadership roles in unprecedented numbers, overseeing their legislatures' daily business, shaping states' political agendas and, advocates say, laying the groundwork to get more women elected.
ADVERTISEMENT

This year, 58 women lawmakers were chosen as legislative leaders — senate presidents, house speakers, presidents pro tem — a 20 percent gain over last year's 48 and more than double the female leaders in 2000, according to a count by the National Conference of State Legislatures.

At just 17 percent of all state legislative leaders, that's still barely one out of six, and far from reflecting the general population; women make up slightly more than half of all Americans.

Still, the gains come at a pivotal moment for female politicians, with
Hillary Rodham Clinton running for president and Nancy Pelosi (news, bio, voting record) the first female speaker of the U.S. House.

Having female legislative leaders will influence the public and fellow lawmakers, they hope, changing attitudes so more women seek public office and more voters choose to support them.

"If you're not at the table, you don't get heard," said Massachusetts Sen. Therese Murray, a Democrat who made history in March when she was chosen by fellow lawmakers to serve as Senate president — the first woman in her state ever to do so. She holds one of the three most powerful positions in state government.

Women legislative leaders numbered only four in the nearly all-male political world of the late 1970s. That figure rose in the 1990s to between 20 and 28 — still 8 percent or less of all legislative leaders.

But after 2000, the numbers began to climb: to 30 in 2001; 42 in 2003; 48 in 2006, and now 58.

Credit goes to the women who broke ground and paid their dues, winning chairmanships and building coalitions, said Debbie Walsh, director of the Center for American Women and Politics at New Jersey's Rutgers University. "Part of it is they've been in there and they've earned their spots," she said.

But that's only part of the equation, she and others say.

"It isn't just about individuals," said Marie Wilson, president of the White House Project, a nonprofit group that aims to encourage women to lead in business and politics. "There has been a change in the country and the culture. The culture matters. ... You start to see women as leaders. You get comfortable with women, whether you like their policies or not."

Women still have a long way to go to achieve parity.

They still make up only 16.3 percent of Congress overall. And Clinton's is the first high-profile female candidacy aiming for the top of the ticket since Geraldine Ferraro served as Walter Mondale's vice presidential running mate in 1984. The Democrats lost to President Reagan and George H.W. Bush.

In state legislatures, women made big gains from the 1970s, when they were an anomaly, through the late 1990s, when growth plateaued at between 20 percent and 22 percent of statehouses. That sparked a nationwide effort to help encourage and train women to give politics a try.

The 2006 election saw the number edge up slightly — now women make up 23.5 percent of state lawmakers. Leadership in state capitals, however, has undergone much more significant changes, especially this decade.

Taking on such responsibilities helps erase the outdated, misguided perception that there are "women's issues," said Kentucky Senate President Pro Tem Katie Stine, a Republican. She not only wields the gavel, but oversees debate and decides what gets heard and when.

"I didn't get the impression that my gender was even an issue" when she was elected, Stine said. "When you're in the forest you don't notice the trees."

But she has noticed that other women lawmakers in Kentucky are still few and far between — only about one out of eight. Just over a third of legislators are women in Colorado, Maryland, Minnesota, New Hampshire and Vermont, the five states with the most female representation.

Women have made gains running for governor, where the current total — nine — is tied with an earlier record.

For Murray in Massachusetts, her rise was a mix of tradition and defying it.

When she first won election, she was only the 16th woman ever elected to the Massachusetts Legislature. Despite her engineering background, she was assigned to the human services committee.

But she wound up as chairwoman of the Senate Ways and Means Committee, one of the most powerful because it decides on the budget, making her a go-to player. That role, along with traditional horse-trading of promises and appointments, helped her win support for the Senate presidency.

Men have a "farm team" — a network of like-minded colleagues that work on campaigns, help people make connections and encourage a bid for office. "Women have never had that farm team," she said.

Slowly, she said, that's starting to change.
Title: Re: you go girl!
Post by: ->Soon on April 13, 2007, 08:41:15 AM
Click-2-Listen
'Ugly Betty' star says body image doesn't weigh heavily on her mind

Associated Press
Published on: 04/13/07

New York —- She may drop a few pounds here and there, but "Ugly Betty" star America Ferrera says she'll never become a Hollywood waif.

"There are times when I go to the gym and really try, and there are times when I just don't," the actress, who turns 23 on Wednesday, tells W magazine in its May issue. "I gain a pound; I lose a pound. But I think I've developed a really good sense of when I'm doing something for myself as opposed to when I'm doing something because of other people's expectations of me.

"And honestly, even if I wanted to be anorexic, I just don't have what it takes," she continues. "After four hours of being anorexic, I'd be like, 'It's been four whole hours! Feed me!' "

Ferrera is on the rise: She won Golden Globe and Screen Actors Guild awards this year for her role as awkward assistant Betty Suarez on "Ugly Betty" and has appeared on a host of magazine covers.

Salma Hayek, an executive producer of the ABC comedy, charmed Ferrara into accepting the part.

"Honestly, I never saw myself doing TV, but Salma was so convincing," says Ferrera, who's starred in the movies "Real Women Have Curves" and "Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants."

"Salma is the kind of person who could sell you, like, a used stereo. She promised me that it would be done in the right way, and I just trusted her."
Title: Re: you go girl!
Post by: dcollins on April 16, 2007, 04:34:57 PM
I just came acroos this great thread.  I'll add some kudos to female athletes making "mile"stones in high profile sports.  These women are tough & are getting tougher, stronger, faster, and - similar to "Betty" - portray untraditional femininity.  Great role models for girls of all backgrounds.  And more & more women are competing at the highest levels.  Road racing is just one example.  (Where would we be without Title IX?)

The winner of today's race did it in 2 1/2 hours...egads 8)


"26 Miles Empowered Women Around the World

Two miles into the 1967 Boston Marathon, an official tried to eject me from the race simply because I was a woman. That event changed my life and, as a consequence, the lives of millions of women around the world.

The marathon was a man’s race in those days; women were considered too fragile to run it. But I had trained hard and was confident of my strength. Still, it took a body block from my boyfriend to knock the official off the course and allow me to complete the 26 miles 385 yards.

In 1967, few would have believed that marathon running would someday attract millions of women, become a glamour event in the Olympics and on the streets of major cities, help transform views of women’s physical ability and help redefine their economic roles in traditional cultures.

It happened because on a basic level, running empowers women and raises their self-esteem while promoting physical fitness easily and inexpensively.

In the final 24 miles of my first Boston Marathon, I knew that women needed only opportunities. I have since devoted my life to opening doors, primarily by creating a series of women’s races in 27 countries. That helped pave the way to the inclusion of the women’s marathon as an official Olympic event in 1984. Joan Benoit Samuelson of Maine crossed the finish line first in that race, an important moment for women watching around the world.

We learned that women are not deficient in endurance and stamina, and that running requires no fancy facilities or equipment. Women’s marathoning has created a global legacy.

I have seen women in Brazil and the Philippines race without shoes but with their hearts full of pride. These runners have helped change much of the social and cultural fabric in their countries.

In Kenya, successful female runners are breaking the cycle of second-class status. They go back to their villages and use their prize money to build schools, purify water and start training camps for other women.

In Japan, companies aim to gain prestige by recruiting female marathoners to run at the highest level. In Britain, many thousands line the streets to see Paula Radcliffe race. In Russia, Mexico and Ethiopia, a few thousand American dollars go a long way to making a better life. The winsome Jelena Prokopcuka has injected spirit into Latvia.

In tomorrow’s Boston Marathon, women will make up 40 percent of the field. The percentage is higher in many other marathons. According to Runners World magazine, women account for an average of 51 percent of the fields in all road races in the United States.

At the same time, the quality of women’s performances has soared. When Radcliffe set the women’s world record, 2 hours 15 minutes 25 seconds, in the 2003 London Marathon, she was also the first British finisher, male or female. The depth of talent has increased to the point that women will be the headliners tomorrow in Boston.

With all due respect to the outstanding international men’s field, including Robert Cheruiyot of Kenya, who won the Boston and Chicago Marathons last year, the real buzz is about the competition among Deena Kastor of the United States, Rita Jeptoo of Kenya and Prokopcuka.

An American woman has not won the Boston race since 1985, so Kastor is under pressure. She has the right stuff. Kastor was the first American woman to break the 2:20 barrier when she won the London Marathon last year in 2:19:36. In 2004, she ran a thrilling come-from-behind race to take the bronze medal in the Athens Olympics.

You can be sure that many lining the route tomorrow from Hopkinton, Mass., to Boston will be screaming encouragement to Kastor to win for the United States, which has struggled to regain dominance in the marathon.

Kastor, who has never run the Boston Marathon, finished sixth in the New York City Marathon last year; Prokopcuka won that race and is making her third Boston appearance. Jeptoo won in Boston last year, even though she arrived only hours before the start because of passport problems. Another contender is Madai Pérez of Mexico, an up-and-comer who may be ready for a breakthrough.

The women’s race should be riveting, and it will be front and center. The Boston race, like several other major marathons, now starts the elite women before the men. The women’s races have become so popular and intriguing that the public and the news media wish to see the race unfold without male runners obstructing the view.

The drama is considerable because the marathon is a long and unpredictable race. Women won the right to run it, and they do so powerfully, inspiring others.

In 40 years, female marathoners have gone from being labeled as intruders to being hailed as stars of the sport."

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/04/15/sports/15switzer.html
Title: Re: you go girl!
Post by: ->Soon on April 19, 2007, 11:13:46 AM
http://www.abanet.org/journal/redesign/04fsolo.html

Roxanne Conlin
Roxanne Conlin & Associates, Des Moines, Iowa
Secrets:
• Use part-time and contract lawyers
• Create a happy work environment
• Work referral networks

Roxanne Conlin, 62, is a grandmother five times over who boasts of being the “most senior civil rights lawyer in Iowa.”

In fact, in 1969, she was among the first to try a case under the state’s civil rights act, and she was the second woman ever to become a U.S. attorney.

In 1982, she lost a close race for governor of Iowa, and she was the first female president of the former Asso­ciation of Trial Lawyers of America. She also conquered alcoholism, which she was forced to face after being arrested for a DUI in 1992.

Today, the firm she runs, Roxanne Conlin & Asso­ciates, has generated more than $1 million in revenue for longer than Conlin can remember—“many, many years,” she says.


Her firm focuses on “representing people who are hurt,” which means plaintiffs and sometimes classes of plaintiffs, in matters involving primarily discrimination, employment, medical malpractice, personal injury and products liability.

Conlin’s staff expands and contracts based on the firm’s workload. She typically has a nonlawyer staff of six, but that ballooned to 12 while she was at trial on a months-long class action that settled in February against Microsoft (the terms of the settlement haven’t been disclosed, but plaintiffs experts estimated $329 million in damages).

She has one part-time associate but also hired an­other two temporary attorneys.

They were former clerks at Conlin’s firm whose time as employees ended once the trial ended, and they handled “whatever the crisis of the moment” was, she says.

She rounds out the staff with six part-time law clerks who work 20 hours per week while attending law school and during summers.


SUPPORT YOUR STAFF

Though Conlin and her employees work hard, she tries to create an atmosphere that encourages people to come to work and perform at their peak. Which is why the office is friendly to both babies and pets. “Usually, we have a full-time baby at the office,” she says. “Right now it’s Ty, my receptionist’s son, who just learned to crawl.”

Conlin says the policy has probably helped reduce staff turnover. Her part-time associate has worked for her 14 years, and her administrative staffers have stayed as long as 30 years. “No one has ever left voluntarily,” she says.

The firm also has a saltwater fish tank, two office cats, frequent litters of foster kittens and a stuffed Santa bear collection. There’s even an aviary—an idea that came to Conlin when she saw one in the lobby of a hospital she was suing.

“I believe we’re the only law office with an aviary,” she says. And if that’s not enough, employees can bring their pets with them to work.

Conlin has found that animals in the office are a win-win situation, pleasing staff and also clients. The animals show clients that “we care about living things and about homeless animals, as well as others in need,” Con­lin says. And the occasional publicity has been nice, too—the firm was recently profiled on a TV newscast for fostering kittens.

Many of Conlin’s cases are referrals from other lawyers throughout the country, with whom she shares the responsibility for the case and the fee. She says she doesn’t market herself to other attorneys and attributes the referrals to her visibility—and “probably adequate verdicts.”

Conlin will likely be accepting referrals for years to come. Though she and her husband of 43 years enjoy their grandchildren and foster kittens at home, too,
vacations away from the legal profession “aren’t really a priority for me,” she says.

“Most of the time, I love my life and my practice and don’t need to get away.”
Title: Re: you go girl!
Post by: ->Soon on April 19, 2007, 12:17:34 PM
http://ms-jd.org/
Title: Re: you go girl!
Post by: ->Soon on April 19, 2007, 01:48:41 PM

http://www.myshingle.com/my_shingle/2005/05/you_never_know_.html

    Also making a major career change from big-firm life is Andrea Wirum, 49, who is in the process of leaving 900-attorney Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman to start her own practice in San Francisco as a Chapter 11 bankruptcy trustee and a mediator. Wirum served as a member of the firm's managing board during the merger between Pillsbury Winthrop, originally based in San Francisco, and 335-attorney Shaw Pittman in Washington, and supported the deal, she said. But the time has come to hang her own shingle.

    "You reach a point in life where you want to give something else a try," she said.
Title: Re: you go girl!
Post by: ->Soon on April 20, 2007, 09:02:53 AM
http://happyfeminist.typepad.com/

just a (law) gal and her blog...
Title: Re: you go girl!
Post by: ->Soon on April 20, 2007, 01:20:20 PM
http://anonymouslawyer.blogspot.com/2004_04_01_archive.html


I gave up religion when I became a corporate lawyer, but Jesus rising from the dead reminds me of an interview story where a student I'd already written off somehow turned the interview around and miraculously got an offer. In celebration of Easter, the story:

The gutsiest hire I ever made. The girl was from a top school, and had sailed through fine in the on-campus interview, and we gave her the callback. I was her first interview of the day, and she comes in -- and almost immediately her cell phone rings. She takes the phone out of her pocket and looks at who's calling. "I need to take this call," she says. I look at her funny. She ignores me, and answers her phone. I can only assume it was her boyfriend on the other end:

"The test came back positive. I'm pregnant," she said. I heard nothing on the other end. "Yes, I'm absolutely certain." I heard screaming coming through the phone. "It's your fault too, jackass." More screaming. "I can't talk now. I'm in the middle of an interview." More screaming. "Go to hell." Calmly she folds up her phone and puts it back in her pocket. "I'm sorry about that," she says.

I had no idea what to say. So I just conducted the interview like nothing happened, knowing there was absolutely no way she was getting an offer, but not knowing what else to do at that point. And, frankly, she blew me away. She knew exactly why she wanted to work here, she had taken all the right classes, had all the right experience, great grades, articulate, funny... and by the end of the interview, she was actually winning me over, although I couldn't believe it.

Finally, as the time was almost up, she looked me straight in the eye and said, "I want to apologize for what happened before. Obviously I have a personal issue I'm dealing with, and it's all just happened, and I know that taking the call, and my language on the call, was completely inappropriate. And I'm sure I've completely blown my chances here, but I do want you to know that's not like me, and I know that if you gave me the chance I'd absolutely demonstrate why I belong here, and you wouldn't regret it." And she said it with such conviction, and her interview had gone so well... that I said nothing to anyone else. And the other interview reports were glowing. And so, despite what happened, I gave her an offer.

She's been here ever since, and is one of my best associates.
Title: Re: you go girl!
Post by: bridget on April 20, 2007, 02:25:45 PM

hmmmm, not sure if i approve of the nerdification of women...


What's this about? 
Title: Re: you go girl!
Post by: ->Soon on April 20, 2007, 02:29:26 PM

hmmmm, not sure if i approve of the nerdification of women...


What's this about? 

if youve ever worked in an IT dept, its just a bunch of nerds.

lets not do that to our women...
Title: Re: you go girl!
Post by: bridget on April 23, 2007, 04:48:55 PM
ah, I get it.  you're trying to provoke the feminists.  ok.
Title: Re: you go girl!
Post by: ->Soon on May 01, 2007, 05:41:27 AM
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/18399649/site/newsweek/

Interview With a Former Fat Girl
In a new book that pulls no punches, Lisa Delaney describes how she changed her life, dropped 70 pounds and kept the weight off. All about the 'mint-chocolate chip incident.'
Title: Re: you go girl!
Post by: ->Soon on May 17, 2007, 02:10:48 PM
http://susancartierliebel.typepad.com/build_a_solo_practice/2007/05/passed_the_bar_.html

you go girl!
Title: Re: you go girl!
Post by: ->Soon on May 22, 2007, 06:38:28 AM
http://www.ajc.com/opinion/content/printedition/2007/05/22/edschultz0522.html

you go girl!
Title: Re: you go girl!
Post by: ->Soon on May 24, 2007, 07:23:58 AM
http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/front/4831608.html

Valedictorian overcame difficult path
Home and school troubles once made her doubt she'd graduate

As a girl, Myrtle Nickerson didn't have a dream job.

"I wanted to have a job that was bringing in some kind of money," the 18-year-old recalls, days before her high school graduation. "Where I was staying, we needed it bad."

Where she was staying changed often. Motels, abandoned houses, couches. With her mom, her aunt, her sister, her friend.

Her mom did drugs and drank, Nickerson says, and the teenager isn't sure of her real dad's name. "Everyone knows him as Dog," she says.

A few years after Nickerson had a baby, at age 15, she tried to bring her dad some photographs. That's when she learned he was dead.

"At first, I didn't know how to feel," Nickerson says. "I'm like, 'OK, I'm not going to feel anything 'cause I didn't really know him.' Then it just sank.

"It's like, 'This is your dad. You're trying to get a relationship with your dad, and he's gone. Graduation's about to come up, and your dad can't be there.' "

There was a time when Nickerson didn't expect to get a high school diploma. But this Saturday, the brown-eyed, baby-faced teen will walk across the stage as valedictorian of her class at the Contemporary Learning Center. The alternative school, in the Houston Independent School District, serves students who are two or three years behind grade level.

For Nickerson, academic struggles began in elementary school. She failed third grade and then fourth before transferring to HISD's Foster Elementary, where she met Sylvia Smith. "She was like the meanest teacher ever," Nickerson says. "But she let me know, 'You're gonna survive.' "

Nickerson hopes her youngest sister will get the mean teacher someday.

"Ms. Smith let 'em know like it is: 'This is who you are, but this is who you can become.' That's what she always used to tell me," Nickerson says.

Today, Smith uses Nickerson as an example for her young students. "This baby had it hard," she says, "and if this baby can succeed, you can do the same. It doesn't matter where you've come from."

In sixth grade, Nickerson landed on the honor roll. In seventh grade, too.

"Then I'm like, 'Man, this is boring,' " Nickerson recalls. "No one praised you. No one said 'Good job' when you brought home report cards."

High hopes
The summer after seventh grade, Nickerson got pregnant. She had slept with her boyfriend just once, she says.

"I thought that was just the end. All the women in my family, they usually have children around the ages 13, 14, 15.

"No disrespect, but I don't want to depend on the welfare system. I don't want to depend on baby daddy — is he or is he not going to send me child support? — I don't want to live in the projects, thinking it's all good. This is not what I want."

A friend's mom helped Nickerson enroll in HISD's school for pregnant moms. The next year, as a freshman, Nickerson went to the Contemporary Learning Center, where semesters last nine weeks, instead of the traditional 18. The classes cut out the fluff, and determined students can graduate in about 2 1/2 years.

With a baby and a heavy class load, Nickerson struggled to carve time out for homework. Some days, she would work through lunch. Other days, she woke up at 3 a.m., two hours before she had to get her daughter, Pahris, up for day care.

Beverly Campbell, the high school guidance counselor, says she's seen many teen moms make excuses to skip school.

"With Myrtle, it was different," Campbell says. "She always tried to schedule appointments for her baby after school. She was always telling me about the baby's diet. If we had a school T-shirt, she says, 'I can't buy that because I have to buy vitamins.' "

Pahris graduated from the 3-year-old class at her day care this week. Mom will follow this weekend. She'll put a gown over her black dress, and, with a grade point average of 3.6, walk across stage as valedictorian.

"That sounds good, doesn't it?" Nickerson asks. "Oh man, it was a fight though. It was one heck of a fight."

In the fall, Nickerson will enter Texas Southern University. These days, she dreams of being a pharmacist.
Title: Re: you go girl!
Post by: ->Soon on June 14, 2007, 07:28:50 PM
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070614/ap_on_re_as/india_president

India set to elect 1st female president
Title: Re: you go girl!
Post by: ->Soon on June 27, 2007, 07:34:05 AM
http://www.sptimes.com/2007/06/27/Business/Co_founder_of_BET_buy.shtml

Co-founder of BET buys Innisbrook

    The sale, for $35-million, likely won't affect the PGA stop there.


you go girl!
Title: Re: you go girl!
Post by: ->Soon on July 22, 2007, 12:39:39 PM
http://www.ajc.com/metro/content/printedition/2007/07/22/world.html

India elects its first female president

Is the US next?
Title: Re: you go girl!
Post by: ->Soon on August 10, 2007, 12:53:25 PM
http://susancartierliebel.typepad.com/build_a_solo_practice/2007/08/a-divergence-th.html


lady bloggers...
Title: Re: you go girl!
Post by: ->Soon on August 28, 2007, 09:07:14 AM
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/08/27/AR2007082701314.html

In First, Woman to Lead Top Med School

Associated Press
Tuesday, August 28, 2007; Page A06

RALEIGH, N.C., Aug. 27 -- Duke University on Monday named a Harvard researcher as the first woman to lead its medical school, making her the only woman permanently at the helm of one of the nation's top 10 medical schools.
Title: Re: you go girl!
Post by: ->Soon on August 28, 2007, 12:29:48 PM
http://www.cnn.com/2007/LIVING/worklife/08/27/woman.pirate/index.html


capt jane sparrow?



Ironically, Cheng I Sao's most famous laws applied to the taking of female prisoners. Ugly women were returned to shore, free of charge. Attractive captives were auctioned off to the crew, unless a pirate personally purchased the captive, in which case they were considered married. Of course, if that pirate cheated on his new bride, Cheng I Sao had him killed.


 :o :o :o
Title: Re: you go girl!
Post by: ->Soon on August 28, 2007, 07:44:41 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xf9W9luyxHw



ummmmm, id still do her, but i think id ask permission b4 smacking her ass.   :o
Title: Re: you go girl!
Post by: tashaquel on August 30, 2007, 08:12:57 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xf9W9luyxHw



ummmmm, id still do her, but i think id ask permission b4 smacking her ass.   :o

haha!
Title: Re: you go girl!
Post by: ->Soon on October 15, 2007, 12:38:00 PM
http://www.thedreamsofasolo.com/


lady solo lawyer...
Title: Re: you go girl!
Post by: XxGodJrxX on October 22, 2007, 12:45:19 AM
Are women minorities?   ??? ??? ???
Title: Re: you go girl!
Post by: ->Soon on October 22, 2007, 05:39:37 AM
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/21382744/

Beam me up!
Title: Re: you go girl!
Post by: ->Soon on November 05, 2007, 07:53:41 AM
http://www.courier-journal.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20071105/NEWS0105/711050451/1008/NEWS01

She's having a blast with her rocket sciences
Meyzeek student wins Ky. science competition    :)
Title: Re: you go girl!
Post by: ->Soon on December 03, 2007, 07:02:34 AM
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/12/02/AR2007120201485.html

In Male-Dominated Industry, A Woman Grabs the Wheel
Darvish Makes History in Taking Over Car Dealers' Group
Title: Re: you go girl!
Post by: ->Soon on December 14, 2007, 07:33:08 AM
http://www.sun-sentinel.com/news/local/broward/sfl-flblawgrad1214sbdec14,0,5197162.story

Weston mother's law degree fulfills husband's dying wish