Law School Discussion

Applying to Law School => Law School Admissions => Topic started by: devilsadvocate on October 07, 2014, 04:00:49 AM

Title: Please Help!
Post by: devilsadvocate on October 07, 2014, 04:00:49 AM
Hi everyone!
I am a high school graduate (class of 2013) from India. I took a drop last year due to some personal issues. I've worked part-time during this period and I'm still working. Now I'm thinking of starting my Undergrad education (probably English major). But the problem is that my family has some financial issues and I was thinking of working full-time. It's going to be in a government  office in clerical grade. I have to pass an exam first but I think I'll be a able to do that. My problem is, if I start college now, I'll not be able to work full-time and support my family. So I was thinking of getting my Bachelor's Degree through a distance education program that a government university in my country offers. It's going to be the same degree that one gets from a regular college, i.e., Bachelor of Arts in English (Honors), but without attending regular classes (as I said it's a distance education program). 

I would like to try and get into a good law school and I was thinking of taking the LSAT in the last year of college. So my question is, is it going to make a difference if I get my Bachelor's Degree through a distance education program? Is there any rule that only regular college students can get into a law school like NYU, Columbia, etc? I googled but I could not find any information regarding this, so please help me if you can. Thanks for reading!
Title: Re: Please Help!
Post by: barprephero on October 07, 2014, 09:10:53 AM
Honestly, try to get into the American Military. They DO take foreigners. I knew a guy from Red China (no joke, Red China) who went to basic training with me. That will get your family state side, a job, and money to pay for your college.
Title: Re: Please Help!
Post by: Maintain FL 350 on October 07, 2014, 11:15:18 AM
So my question is, is it going to make a difference if I get my Bachelor's Degree through a distance education program? Is there any rule that only regular college students can get into a law school like NYU, Columbia, etc?

No, there is no rule that prevents distance learning graduates from entering law schools in the United States. The main factors will be your LSAT score and grades.

However...

Schools like NYU and Columbia are highly competitive in terms of admission. They have literally thousands of applicants to choose from, many of whom graduated from peer institutions (Harvard, Yale, etc) or well respected public universities (Michigan, Berkeley, UCLA, etc).

In that type of hyper competitive environment a graduate of a foreign distance learning program might be at a disadvantage. If the foreign university is well known and respected internationally, then alright. But if it's a program that is not well known it may be difficult to compete with the other applicants.
Title: Re: Please Help!
Post by: barprephero on October 07, 2014, 01:13:10 PM
While I stand by my (slightly offtopic) posts above, I agree with my fellow JD grad on online degrees being ok too. Just make sure it is a REGIONAL accrediting agency approved by the US Dept of Education (double check, don't just take their word for it) National is oddly considered lower than regional
Title: Re: Please Help!
Post by: Groundhog on October 07, 2014, 01:57:27 PM
A few questions for OP:

Why the US? How will you finance your education, given non-US citizens aren't eligible for financial aid?

Frankly, even assuming admissions were no problem, many law students in the US have trouble financing their education. You'd then be a US JD graduate, but not be eligible to work here. What is your eventual goal?
Title: Re: Please Help!
Post by: barprephero on October 07, 2014, 04:24:17 PM
A few questions for OP:

Why the US? How will you finance your education, given non-US citizens aren't eligible for financial aid?

Frankly, even assuming admissions were no problem, many law students in the US have trouble financing their education. You'd then be a US JD graduate, but not be eligible to work here. What is your eventual goal?
There are private student loans I think, plus (in theory) scholarships
I would say this is even more reason to aim military though, they pay for it and room and board
Title: Re: Please Help!
Post by: barprephero on October 07, 2014, 04:26:55 PM
There is the option of online law school too, but be afraid be VERY afraid! :o
It is only good in CA and requires a lot of extra hoops to jump through with drastically majority attrition rates
But..........they take ANYONE and most have private financing payment plan options.

Most also let you start with only an Associates, and many provide that Associates Degree at their school as well if you need it.
The correspondence ones often tend to be self paces as well, often without a proctor (varies by the school)
Here is the official list of all the schools and by their type in CA

http://admissions.calbar.ca.gov/Education/LegalEducation/LawSchools.aspx
Again, caveat emptor, but an educated man explores ALL options.
Title: Re: Please Help!
Post by: Groundhog on October 08, 2014, 03:40:01 AM
There are private student loans I think, plus (in theory) scholarships
I would say this is even more reason to aim military though, they pay for it and room and board
One cannot join the U.S. military unless one is already a permanent resident or citizen.
Title: Re: Please Help!
Post by: barprephero on October 08, 2014, 07:01:59 PM
There are private student loans I think, plus (in theory) scholarships
I would say this is even more reason to aim military though, they pay for it and room and board
One cannot join the U.S. military unless one is already a permanent resident or citizen.
I never bothered to ask if they were perm res, but I knew lots were not citizens. Maybe OP can achieve that I don't know. The other ideas that I posted  are still worth exploring too.