Law School Discussion

LSAT Preparation => Studying for the LSAT => Topic started by: Sofiya on November 05, 2008, 08:42:05 AM

Title: LSAT Preparation Courses
Post by: Sofiya on November 05, 2008, 08:42:05 AM
Hello Everyone,

I am actually looking for some advice in regards to the LSAT preparation course available in NYC. I have heard horrible things about the always advertised Kaplan courses, which I took for some High School preparation test. I have spoken to a professional and expert in the area, and she suggested the NYU continuing education LSAT preparation program. If someone can critique/comment/suggest any choices, and why you think they are most suitable.

Many thanks,

Sofiya
Title: Re: LSAT Preparation Courses
Post by: sockwok on November 05, 2008, 04:24:49 PM
I am currently in the Nelson Test Prep course in NYC. I take the weekend classes. We take diagnostics with real previous exams. She gives homework(lots). Course material is all the Official LSAT Test books(10 actual, 10 more & the next 10).

I recommend it.

http://nelsontestprep.com/
Title: Re: LSAT Preparation Courses
Post by: EarlCat on November 05, 2008, 04:34:31 PM
I don't know her personally, but I have it on good authority that Carolyn Nelson is top notch.  I also highly recommend Andrew Brody at TPR, but I'm not sure if he's teaching at the moment.
Title: Re: LSAT Preparation Courses
Post by: gabriele on November 10, 2008, 10:16:34 AM
Andrew Brody is a god! If he is teaching definitely take his course!!
Title: Re: LSAT Preparation Courses
Post by: Sofiya on November 12, 2008, 11:05:45 AM
Thanks everyone. I will definetly take a look at both of the schools you mentioned. In regards to Brody, how many people would you say are in his class ? Also, does anyone know anything about the level in NYU LSAT classes? - Many Thanks.
Title: Re: LSAT Preparation Courses
Post by: Sofiya on November 12, 2008, 11:32:22 AM
Btw, I found about Brody, he is currently teaching in Princeton Review but does anyone perhaps have some kind of contact info on him because they won't tell you the instructor's name until the class ? Gabriele & EarlCat, why do you so highly recommend him specifically ? (besides the fact that he got a 180). Who would you say is better, Nelson or Brody?
Title: Re: LSAT Preparation Courses
Post by: theknowinsamoan on November 12, 2008, 03:42:29 PM
I'm totally biased because I took this class and now I work for this company, that said, take a look at Brent Dunn's on-line DVD course www.acetestprep.com/lsatdvdinfo.php (http://www.acetestprep.com/lsatdvdinfo.php). 

We've had great success with our DVD students because of our comprehensive approach to teaching logic and analytical skills.  You would receive all of the previously administered LSAT tests. We will support you via e-mail & phone for as long as you are studying for the LSAT.  We've had two 180 students in the past year.
Title: Re: LSAT Preparation Courses
Post by: EarlCat on November 12, 2008, 06:18:35 PM
Btw, I found about Brody, he is currently teaching in Princeton Review but does anyone perhaps have some kind of contact info on him because they won't tell you the instructor's name until the class ?

That's not cool.  It's possible they don't have anyone assigned for the class yet.  At the worst, you could get private tutoring, or just sign up, and drop after the first day if your instructor sucks (hopefully nobody in NY sucks...in a market that big they ought to have their pick of top instructors).

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Gabriele & EarlCat, why do you so highly recommend him specifically ? (besides the fact that he got a 180). Who would you say is better, Nelson or Brody?

I don't know Nelson personally, so I can't say much about her except that people who know more than I ever will about teaching LSAT say she's one of the best in the industry.  I met Brody in a training class a year or so ago, and he really knew his stuff.  He's been doing it for years and worked his way into being one of the big-wigs in the company for content development.  Not many people are going to know the test better than he does.

You're not going to go wrong with either of them I'm sure.
Title: Re: LSAT Preparation Courses
Post by: Brent Dunn on November 13, 2008, 08:37:17 AM
I think that the comment about teacher quality is dead on. Having taught LSAT for over 14 years, I have seen many people who can score well on the LSAT, but don't really convey that knowledge well to other people. When you can find someone who does know their stuff really well, and can explain it well, you have a great find indeed.

One of the most important things that you can do is GO SIT IN on one of the classes being taught. IMHO any company/teacher that is worth their salt will let you see what the class is like before making a decision. That way you can make an informed decision about the class. Think of it as taking a test drive before buying a car.

Title: Re: LSAT Preparation Courses
Post by: Sofiya on November 14, 2008, 12:50:18 PM
Thanks so much for all the feedback everyone. I have actually began studying on my own and got the bibles, the books, the resources, I just feel that I am better learner when its a classroom, and although studying at home is # 1, going to a classroom and having an expert in the actual LSAT test taking technique help me out would without a doubt help me out.

In regards to Brody, he is currently a private tutor, and comes with a price tag of $7300. I have not heard very positive things on other Princeton tutors, except the fact that they themselves did well on the LSATs, which is applauded, but might not help me, and might not be worth the money.



One of the most important things that you can do is GO SIT IN on one of the classes being taught. IMHO any company/teacher that is worth their salt will let you see what the class is like before making a decision. That way you can make an informed decision about the class. Think of it as taking a test drive before buying a car.


^ Thanks for the tip. I will definetly sit in before commiting and I agree, a person who believes in his/her abilities and strengths in teaching a classroom should not have any problem with me sitting in on a little portion of the class.

Thanks again everyone.
Title: Re: LSAT Preparation Courses
Post by: sorrynoidforme on November 14, 2008, 02:48:52 PM
Whatever you do, don't sign up for Powerscore. Their approach is too complex and lacking in so many aspects.

Personally, I'm using some of Kaplan at the moment, and found it to be 10 times more useful than Powerscore.

This doesn't mean choose Kaplan, but sometimes, you get what you pay for and Powerscore might be cheap because they don't offer certain things that other 'more' expensive courses offer.

Bye.
Title: Re: LSAT Preparation Courses
Post by: EarlCat on November 14, 2008, 02:52:19 PM
In regards to Brody, he is currently a private tutor, and comes with a price tag of $7300.

Wow.

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I have not heard very positive things on other Princeton tutors, except the fact that they themselves did well on the LSATs

What am I, chopped liver?  ;)

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, which is applauded, but might not help me, and might not be worth the money.

Other tutors won't typically cost that much, and in a market with several, you can always ask to switch.  I'm assuming that's the case with all the companies in NY except Nelson.

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a person who believes in his/her abilities and strengths in teaching a classroom should not have any problem with me sitting in on a little portion of the class.

Truth.
Title: Re: LSAT Preparation Courses
Post by: EarlCat on November 14, 2008, 02:56:49 PM
Whatever you do, don't sign up for Powerscore. Their approach is too complex and lacking in so many aspects.

Care to elaborate?
Title: Re: LSAT Preparation Courses
Post by: sorrynoidforme on November 14, 2008, 03:24:38 PM
Whatever you do, don't sign up for Powerscore. Their approach is too complex and lacking in so many aspects.

Care to elaborate?

I don't have time to elaborate at the moment, but I will when time allows.

Title: Re: LSAT Preparation Courses
Post by: Sofiya on November 17, 2008, 01:52:33 PM
Again, thanks for all the replies. I am really not considering Kaplan as a choice because I had my own bad experience with the school, and I am not wasting my money on useless classes. In regards to Nelson, I was wondering if anyone knew of any good schools like Nelson, perhaps based on one person, or a private group of tutors. Maybe I should consider a privcate tutor someone knows as being an educated and knowledgeable professional in this field although I prefer the classroom setting more for these purposes. I am also planning on taking the test in Sept. 09 and was looking to maybe even take two separate courses. One in the upcoming Spring, and one in the summer. Perhaps you guys would have suggestions now that you have that last piece of info.

- In regards to Princeton Review, I find that their approach to the courses is too advertised, too commercial with no real knowdledge foundation. Princeton review is everywhere that is why I am a little skeptical of companies like it. I have found that smaller, more private schools are the hidden gem, the ones that have the best professors, not a 20 y.o. kid teaching other 20 y.o kids how to think logically (hope that doesn't offend anyone.

Any suggestions ?
 
Whatever you do, don't sign up for Powerscore. Their approach is too complex and lacking in so many aspects.

^ wasnt even considering Powerscore, although I do have the books.
Title: Re: LSAT Preparation Courses
Post by: EarlCat on November 17, 2008, 09:30:17 PM
In regards to Princeton Review, I find that their approach to the courses is too advertised, too commercial with no real knowdledge foundation.

Where did you find support for this?

Quote
Princeton review is everywhere that is why I am a little skeptical of companies like it. I have found that smaller, more private schools are the hidden gem, the ones that have the best professors, not a 20 y.o. kid teaching other 20 y.o kids how to think logically (hope that doesn't offend anyone.

You should be skeptical of everyone, and like I've said a bajillion times, it's the instructor, not the brand.  Don't try to generalize big vs. small or corporate vs. private.  That's laziness.  You gotta do your homework on the actual human being who will be showing you how to work the test.

I have a good friend who was an excellent instructor at one of the major prep companies.  When he left them to go independent, he didn't suddenly become a better instructor.  When he later rejoined the company, he didn't suddenly get worse.
Title: Re: LSAT Preparation Courses
Post by: Imperial Russian Stout! on November 17, 2008, 09:59:37 PM
Earlcat speaks with much wisdom and truth.  I took TM, which is basically the king of LSAT prep in my area (I'm in a major market), and the instructor quality varied widely.  Seriously, from excellent to bad.  To be fair to TM, they allow you to transfer courses, so if you have an instructor you don't dig, you can switch to another parallel course.  However, follow Earlcat's advice.  Professors/advisors/and law students alike throw out the TM name in my area as if taking anyone of their courses will undeniably provide you with the holy grail of LSAT wisdom, but I can definitely see some students getting better prep than others within the same company.
Title: Re: LSAT Preparation Courses
Post by: tag120 on November 18, 2008, 06:25:19 AM
Whatever you do, don't sign up for Powerscore. Their approach is too complex and lacking in so many aspects.

That doesn't make any sense. How could it be both too complex and lacking? The techniques by the big companies (such as TestMasters and Powerscore) are complex. That's why they take so many hours to teach to students. I think that if you go with the less comprehensive courses, you just aren't going to know enough to get a high score.
Title: Re: LSAT Preparation Courses
Post by: EarlCat on November 18, 2008, 03:02:46 PM
I don't think complex and comprehensive are related.  I prefer simplicity while still being comprehensive.  It is possible to over-complicate or over-categorize things.  Einstein once said that things should be made as simple as possible...but no simpler.