Law School Discussion

Law Students => Online Law Schools => Topic started by: Undisputed on April 04, 2008, 10:43:23 PM

Title: First Concord-Educated Attorneys Admitted to U.S. Supreme Court Bar
Post by: Undisputed on April 04, 2008, 10:43:23 PM

http://www.cnbc.com/id/23688232/ (http://www.cnbc.com/id/23688232/)

LOS ANGELES, Mar 18, 2008 (BUSINESS WIRE) -- Four Concord Law School graduates were admitted to the U.S. Supreme Court yesterday during a ceremony that served as a milestone for the nation's first wholly online law school and as recognition of the evolution of legal education.

"Many lawyers are admitted to the Supreme Court Bar each year and thus have the privilege of arguing before the U.S. Supreme Court. However, these are the first practicing attorneys who were fully educated online to be admitted before all of the Justices in open court," said Barry Currier, JD, President and Dean of Concord, which is based in Los Angeles. "Concord fills a significant need in legal education by providing students with an opportunity to get a rigorous education without having to put their careers on hold, and without many of the costs associated with campus-based programs." For admission to the Supreme Court of the United States, attorneys must be sponsored by two attorneys who have already been admitted there and must obtain a certificate of good standing as evidence that they have been a member of the Bar for three years and are in good standing.

The four Concord-educated attorneys admitted to the U.S. Supreme Court are: -- Larry David of Pasadena, CA, who holds an MBA from USC and had a successful international career in business management in China. Today, he is involved in the general practice of law and handles many pro-bono cases in domestic violence, volunteering at the Los Angeles County Bar Association Barristers Domestic Violence Project.

-- Dentist Michael Kaner of Newtown, PA, who now serves as a consultant on risk management and forensic dentistry.

-- Ross Mitchell of West Newton, MA, a computer systems consultant who is using his legal training to pursue greater acceptance of online legal education and to promote the expansion of the multi-jurisdictional practice of law.

-- Sandusky Shelton of Clio, CA, a retired telecommunications manager who now gives back to her community by taking court-appointed juvenile dependency cases.

Approximately 40 percent of Concord students are working professionals who hold at least one master's degree, including dozens of MDs, MBAs and PhDs. They use their legal education to enhance their current careers or to practice law as a second career. Graduates who successfully complete the Concord program are eligible to sit for the California Bar Exam.

About Concord Law School Concord Law School of Kaplan University was founded in 1998 and today has 1,500 students across the country and around the world. Since Concord's first graduating class in November 2002, more than 700 students have completed the JD and EJD programs. The formal merger of Concord into Kaplan University in the fall of 2007 made Concord the first online law school to be part of a regionally accredited institution of higher education. Kaplan University is accredited by The Higher Learning Commission (HLC) and a member of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools. Concord is also accredited by the Accrediting Commission of the Distance Education and Training Council, a nationally recognized accrediting agency. Additionally, Concord is an institutional member of the Council for Higher Education Accreditation and the International Association of Law Schools. For more information, visit info.concordlawschool.edu.

About Kaplan Higher Education Concord Law School of Kaplan University is part of Kaplan Higher Education, which serves 80,000 students through 70 campus-based schools across the United States and in Europe. It also offers online high school programs through Kaplan Virtual Education, and undergraduate and graduate programs through Kaplan University. Kaplan Higher Education schools offer a spectrum of academic opportunities, from high school diplomas to graduate and professional degrees, including a Juris Doctor degree. Kaplan Higher Education is part of Kaplan, Inc., a subsidiary of The Washington Post Company (NYSE: WPO). For more information, visit www.kaplan.com.
Title: Re: First Concord-Educated Attorneys Admitted to U.S. Supreme Court Bar
Post by: DuckHuntinLawyer on April 05, 2008, 12:10:58 AM
There goes the sanctity of the legal profession...
Title: Re: First Concord-Educated Attorneys Admitted to U.S. Supreme Court Bar
Post by: jacy85 on April 05, 2008, 05:30:18 AM
While being admitted to the Supreme Court Bar is pretty cool, I have to say, the requirements (2 buddies already members of the bar to sponsor you and state bar membership for 3 years) aren't exactly strict.  I fail to see how this really adds any credibility to this school, where the vast majority of people who go there can't pass the bar or get jobs.
Title: Re: First Concord-Educated Attorneys Admitted to U.S. Supreme Court Bar
Post by: Undisputed on April 05, 2008, 07:37:46 AM
While being admitted to the Supreme Court Bar is pretty cool,

I think it's pretty cool also. ;)
Title: Re: First Concord-Educated Attorneys Admitted to U.S. Supreme Court Bar
Post by: Big Changes on April 05, 2008, 09:13:48 AM
There goes the sanctity of the legal profession...

That's pretty rude. Is the legal profession really crumbling because professionals are getting an online degree to supplement their training? HOW DARE a retired telecommunications manager get a degree to do community service work in juvenile dependency cases!

How dare a successful professional get an online degree and use it for pro-bono work involving domestic violence cases!

If you're going to posit that online degrees don't have their place, you're arguing against the evidence. Of course they have their place, some people want to expand their specialty (the dentist who uses his degree for forensics?), and some people want to help out in pro-bono cases.

Granted, an online degree most likely isn't right for the average person, or even the vast majority of people. But assuming that the "sanctity of the legal profession" is crumbling because an online school fills a niche market is ridiculous.
Title: Re: First Concord-Educated Attorneys Admitted to U.S. Supreme Court Bar
Post by: Undisputed on April 05, 2008, 09:42:12 AM
I totally agree with your stance BC. When I posted this article, I knew exactly the mix response I was going to get. ;D Though you know what, Rome wasn't built in a day and neither was it respected in that length. In other words, it's going to take time but I have confidence in it. :)
Title: Re: First Concord-Educated Attorneys Admitted to U.S. Supreme Court Bar
Post by: jacy85 on April 05, 2008, 10:46:53 AM

If you're going to posit that online degrees don't have their place, you're arguing against the evidence. Of course they have their place, some people want to expand their specialty (the dentist who uses his degree for forensics?), and some people want to help out in pro-bono cases.

The dentist who uses his specialty for forensics wants to know more about the law to simply know more about the law, and give him a slight edge perhaps in his specialty.  It's not because he wants to practice.  Therefore, however he wants to learn a little more doesn't matter.

And as for people who want to do pro bono work...why should we care if people want to do pro bono work?  There are people in every law school around the country who want to do pro bono work.  Pro-bono clients deserve quality legal representation as much as the huge corporation paying millions in legal fees.  And without any indication that these online schools are actually and consistently turning out quality graduates who can pass the bar and practice law, they don't really serve any purpose beyond the dentist who wants to broaden his horizons a little bit.  And from all the evidence I've seen posted at various times on this board, there seems to be little support that these schools generally produce quality, competent practicing attorneys.

And as for the non-trad argument...well, there are more than a few non-trads that go to my school, and they're becoming more and prevalent at every accredited school.  So I don't buy the whole, "we non-trads can't possibly go to a regular school" thing; it's a sacrifice, definitely, especially when one has a family.  But other people deal with it and make it work, so it's possible.
Title: Re: First Concord-Educated Attorneys Admitted to U.S. Supreme Court Bar
Post by: DuckHuntinLawyer on April 05, 2008, 11:29:34 AM
There goes the sanctity of the legal profession...

That's pretty rude. Is the legal profession really crumbling because professionals are getting an online degree to supplement their training? HOW DARE a retired telecommunications manager get a degree to do community service work in juvenile dependency cases!

How dare a successful professional get an online degree and use it for pro-bono work involving domestic violence cases!

If you're going to posit that online degrees don't have their place, you're arguing against the evidence. Of course they have their place, some people want to expand their specialty (the dentist who uses his degree for forensics?), and some people want to help out in pro-bono cases.

Granted, an online degree most likely isn't right for the average person, or even the vast majority of people. But assuming that the "sanctity of the legal profession" is crumbling because an online school fills a niche market is ridiculous.

I apologize if that seems rude to you. However, I still stand by it.

Along the same lines Jacy discussed above, I think these schools/businesses degrade a profession that is already unfavorable in the public eye. They do a disservice to the public, and to their students, by not providing the adequate legal training to produce competent lawyers. How well do online chat rooms (I am assuming they use these) facilitate an engaging debate and the use of the Socratic method? How well can you participate in clinics over the internet? Is there a virtual courtroom where you "stand" before a panel of judges and give you "oral" argument? Probably not, although these skills are necessary to the practice of law. Do you think they would let people get a medical degree online without participating in some type of clinical classes? I wouldn't want that doctor performing surgery on me, just as I wouldn't want a graduate from an online "law school" taking on a case that affects my rights. A graduate (I dare not say "lawyer") from one of those online schools who represents a client is at a marked disadvantage in an adversarial system where the opposing attorney has the proper practical and theoretical training from an ABA accredited law school.

And if a dentist wants to know more about the law to supplement his practice, he should have attended an accredited dental school that requires their students to take legal ethics/dental malpractice class (I understand that most accredited dental schools require these types of courses, at least that what my buddy who is a dentist says).

As Jacy said, why do pro-bono clients deserve a less competent lawyer? That's ridiculous. Especially in domestic cases where the outcome of their case has a huge impact on their lives.

Now, online legal courses may have their place for helping established professionals learn more about the law, but there is no way in hell they should be allowed to practice law with that type of education.
Title: Re: First Concord-Educated Attorneys Admitted to U.S. Supreme Court Bar
Post by: Dr. Balsenschaft on April 05, 2008, 01:39:01 PM

Along the same lines Jacy discussed above, I think these schools/businesses degrade a profession that is already unfavorable in the public eye. They do a disservice to the public, and to their students, by not providing the adequate legal training to produce competent lawyers. How well do online chat rooms (I am assuming they use these) facilitate an engaging debate and the use of the Socratic method? How well can you participate in clinics over the internet? Is there a virtual courtroom where you "stand" before a panel of judges and give you "oral" argument? Probably not, although these skills are necessary to the practice of law.

I seriously doubt the Socratic method is going to make me a better lawyer.  The only thing the Socratic method has taught me is how to give short answers to complicated questions so a professor will leave me alone and call on someone else.  It has also taught me to not raise my hand.  You do have a point about clinics and oral arguments but those are two very small and insignificant aspects of a brick and mortar law school education. 

I could probably learn the substantive areas of the law online or even on my own.  The reason why I go to a "real" law school is so I can get a decent job once I graduate - it has very little to do with education. 
Title: Re: First Concord-Educated Attorneys Admitted to U.S. Supreme Court Bar
Post by: jacy85 on April 05, 2008, 02:22:12 PM
I just want to say that I never said I don't think it's possible for a successful on-line law school, or at least some possible integration of online classes w/ regular schools.  It may be possible.  I just don't think the school currently in the business are very unsuccessful and do more harm than good.  The people who think they're going to get to go out and be a practicing lawyer after shelling out money (often times as much as "real" schools) are more likely than not going to be extremely disappointed.

For that matter, the exact same thing can be said about more than a few T4 schools.
Title: Re: First Concord-Educated Attorneys Admitted to U.S. Supreme Court Bar
Post by: Undisputed on April 06, 2008, 06:09:42 PM
The people who think they're going to get to go out and be a practicing lawyer after shelling out money (often times as much as "real" schools) are more likely than not going to be extremely disappointed.

For that matter, the exact same thing can be said about more than a few T4 schools.

Among this 2008 U.S. News ranking list http://grad-schools.usnews.rankingsandreviews.com/grad/law/search/c_final_tier+4 (http://grad-schools.usnews.rankingsandreviews.com/grad/law/search/c_final_tier+4) which ones are the "more than a few T4 schools" by any chance?

Appalachian School of Law
Ave Maria School of Law
Barry University
CUNY--Queens College
California Western School of Law
Campbell University (Wiggins)
Capital University
Duquesne University
Florida Coastal School of Law
Florida International University
Golden Gate University
John Marshall Law School
Mississippi College
New England School of Law
North Carolina Central University
Northern Illinois University
Northern Kentucky University (Chase)
Nova Southeastern University (Broad)
Oklahoma City University
Regent University
Roger Williams University
South Texas College of Law
Southern Illinois University--Carbondale
Southern University
Southwestern Law School
St. Mary's University
St. Thomas University
Texas Southern University (Marshall)
Texas Wesleyan University
Thomas Jefferson School of Law
Thomas M. Cooley Law School
Touro College (Fuchsberg)
University of Dayton
University of Detroit Mercy
University of Memphis (Humphreys)
University of North Dakota
University of Tulsa
University of the District of Columbia (Clarke)
Valparaiso University
Western New England College
Whittier Law School
Widener University
William Mitchell College of Law

You also bring up the point about "shelling out money." I read this PDF a while back that I thought was interesting.

www.abcny.org/pdf/report/PanelDiscussionABCNYMeeting-42704.pdf
Title: Re: First Concord-Educated Attorneys Admitted to U.S. Supreme Court Bar
Post by: jacy85 on April 07, 2008, 04:02:17 AM
The only T4 I know off the top of my head that's really bad is Cooley - they accept tons of students a year (pretty much anyone with a pulse can get in, from what I remember), and their attrition rate is HUGE every single year.  They say they're giving people "a chance" when in reality, a huge number of the people admitted are there just to provide cash to the university.

there are others that seem to have similar reputations; I don't keep up with T4 schools, however, so I couldn't tell you which ones.  I wouldn't want to hazard a guess because there are some T4s that do actually put the work into trying to provide a quality legal education, and I don't think they should be lumped in with the others trying to get in to the market to prey on the vulnerabilities of people looking for "a chance."
Title: Re: First Concord-Educated Attorneys Admitted to U.S. Supreme Court Bar
Post by: Undisputed on April 07, 2008, 11:48:20 AM
The only T4 I know off the top of my head that's really bad is Cooley ...there are others that seem to have similar reputations;

You said "more then a few," you gave me one (Thomas M. Cooley Law School). I was expecting you would dismiss 10 specifically named. But I guess for now we can rely on the ambiguity of that speculation for forum and blogging purposes.
I'm going to put that aside for now but I'll get back to it. :D

others trying to get in to the market to prey on the vulnerabilities of people looking for "a chance."


Now I'm not trying to paint a rationalization to embrace a right away to expand professional schools for marketing ventures but can't this be said about any academic system in the U.S. either graduate, undergraduate, community college, all the way down to where we send our kids to public or private school? Because if that the case, wouldn't your argument be so broad enough to be “bad vs. good school” rather then T3 and up vs. online and "more then a few" T4's?

So going back to my first question I asked you: Among this 2008 U.S. News ranking list http://grad-schools.usnews.rankingsandreviews.com/grad/law/search/c_final_tier+4 which ones are the "more than a few T4 schools" by any chance?  ???

Appalachian School of Law
Ave Maria School of Law
Barry University
CUNY--Queens College
California Western School of Law
Campbell University (Wiggins)
Capital University
Duquesne University
Florida Coastal School of Law
Florida International University
Golden Gate University
John Marshall Law School
Mississippi College
New England School of Law
North Carolina Central University
Northern Illinois University
Northern Kentucky University (Chase)
Nova Southeastern University (Broad)
Oklahoma City University
Regent University
Roger Williams University
South Texas College of Law
Southern Illinois University--Carbondale
Southern University
Southwestern Law School
St. Mary's University
St. Thomas University
Texas Southern University (Marshall)
Texas Wesleyan University
Thomas Jefferson School of Law
Thomas M. Cooley Law School
Touro College (Fuchsberg)
University of Dayton
University of Detroit Mercy
University of Memphis (Humphreys)
University of North Dakota
University of Tulsa
University of the District of Columbia (Clarke)
Valparaiso University
Western New England College
Whittier Law School
Widener University
William Mitchell College of Law

I don't keep up with T4 schools, however, so I couldn't tell you which ones. I wouldn't want to hazard a guess because there are some T4s that do actually put the work into trying to provide a quality legal education,


Ok, since you don't follow T4 schools among "the following correspondence law schools, which include online or distance learning law schools, that are currently registered by the Committee of Bar Examiners of the State Bar of California and have met the registration requirements specified in Rule XIX," http://calbar.ca.gov/state/calbar/calbar_generic.jsp?cid=10115&id=5128 which are the "bad ones"? You know, the ones that are going to leave the majority of their alumni unemployed, heart broken, etc, etc. ???
 
Abraham Lincoln University School of Law
American Heritage University School of Law
Aristotle University Institute of Law and Jurisprudence
California School of Law
Concord Law School of Kaplan University
MD Kirk School of Law Newport University School of Law
Northwestern California University School of Law
Oak Brook College of Law and Government Policy
California Southern University
University of Honolulu School of Law
West Coast School of Law
West Haven University School of Law
Taft Law School

Now I'm just assuming you follow these online schools but if you do how many of them are the "bad ones?"

9 of them?, 10 of them?, all of them? Because if it's not all of the them I don't think the "good ones" should be "lumped in with the others." And if it's all or any of them, besides what they share, what do you know of all 13 of these schools individually?

My point or speculation based on what ever you want to call it, is that it's easy to dismiss "the bottom" with "hazard guesses" and speculation on where these non-Socratics are going to end up but if there was never such thing as an online or distance learning law school, people would probably single out T4 school with a lot more confidence then just naming one using your same exact observation. ;)

Title: Re: First Concord-Educated Attorneys Admitted to U.S. Supreme Court Bar
Post by: thorc954 on April 07, 2008, 11:58:14 AM
Ill help Jacy out with this one.

All of the online schools are bad, because you cannot take the bar (outside of Cali and maybe another state? either way, cannot take the bar in any decent states). 

Second, pretty much the entire list of T4s are crap excluding maybe Regents since they have some great placement into government jobs (at least until a liberal takes over office).  As far as TTT schools, most towards the bottom are kind of poor, but many have redeeming qualities.

That said, there is no reason to praise a school for something like having attorneys admitted to the SCOTUS Bar.  This takes absolutely no effort from the school nor does it take any real effort from the attorneys.  Within 5 years, anyone that wants to be a member of the SCOTUS bar at my school will be.  What do you need, two friends on the bar?  I already have one of those and once I start at my firm, I am guaranteed to make many more.  Not a difficult or significant accomplishment. 

So, save the praise of Concord for when their attorneys actually argue in the court.  I am tired of people naming insignificant things and attributing them to a school as an accomplishment.  There is no effort involved in becoming a member of the bar.  The only thing surprising is that there are actually three members of that mail order degree that where able to pass the state bar and go for three years without committing serious malpractice and getting disbarred.
Title: Re: First Concord-Educated Attorneys Admitted to U.S. Supreme Court Bar
Post by: Undisputed on April 07, 2008, 12:20:09 PM
pretty much the entire list of T4s are crap excluding maybe Regents since they have some great placement into government jobs

Damn, that's pretty hard man. lmao :D
Title: Re: First Concord-Educated Attorneys Admitted to U.S. Supreme Court Bar
Post by: thorc954 on April 07, 2008, 12:34:22 PM
agreed.  its hard cause they all suck and scam people out of money.  Its kinda sad because Id really like everyone that wanted to be a lawyer to have the opportunity, but these schools, with horrendous forced curves, just sucker people in then let them go immediately.  At least, in the top schools, they weed out who isnt capable of being a lawyer in advance and virtually guarantee everyone that attends a seat at graduation. 
Title: Re: First Concord-Educated Attorneys Admitted to U.S. Supreme Court Bar
Post by: Undisputed on April 07, 2008, 12:57:01 PM
Its kinda sad because Id really like everyone that wanted to be a lawyer to have the opportunity, 

Not trying to be foul or anything but do you really mean that? I mean that's a lot of schools your objecting to(the lower TTT, T4s, online)  ???
Title: Re: First Concord-Educated Attorneys Admitted to U.S. Supreme Court Bar
Post by: thorc954 on April 07, 2008, 12:59:42 PM
yea, i really mean that, but i really mean that in an ideal world.  I think that everyone should be able to do what they want with their lives and get the jobs that they really want, etc.  However, this isnt that world and people from the schools I listed arent capable of getting the jobs they want (or at least not all of them are capable), so it sucks and the schools should be done away with. 
Title: Re: First Concord-Educated Attorneys Admitted to U.S. Supreme Court Bar
Post by: Undisputed on April 07, 2008, 01:16:11 PM
However, this isnt that world and people from the schools I listed arent capable of getting the jobs they want (or at least not all of them are capable), so it sucks and the schools should be done away with. 

Well I don't agree with you but I'm glad you didn't pull any punches or rationalize your beliefs. And though this world is cynical as it may seem I'm going to continue doing the best I can as a student.  8)
Title: Re: First Concord-Educated Attorneys Admitted to U.S. Supreme Court Bar
Post by: thorc954 on April 07, 2008, 02:11:30 PM
well, good for you then, i wish you the best of luck with your studies and future employment.
Title: Re: First Concord-Educated Attorneys Admitted to U.S. Supreme Court Bar
Post by: Undisputed on April 07, 2008, 02:31:10 PM
well, good for you then, i wish you the best of luck with your studies and future employment.

 Thanks :)
Title: Re: First Concord-Educated Attorneys Admitted to U.S. Supreme Court Bar
Post by: NYC2L on April 07, 2008, 02:46:56 PM
I'm going to have to disagree slightly with thorc954. Not every T3 and T4 should be disbanded. But all private for-profit one should. After the purge, the following T4 schools would remain: CUNY--Queens College, North Carolina Central University, Southern University (really cheap), University of North Dakota and University of the District of Columbia. I did not go through the T3's but many of them should go as well.
Title: Re: First Concord-Educated Attorneys Admitted to U.S. Supreme Court Bar
Post by: jacy85 on April 07, 2008, 03:46:31 PM
I'm going to have to disagree slightly with thorc954. Not every T3 and T4 should be disbanded. But all private for-profit one should. After the purge, the following T4 schools would remain: CUNY--Queens College, North Carolina Central University, Southern University (really cheap), University of North Dakota and University of the District of Columbia. I did not go through the T3's but many of them should go as well.

I would agree with this; it's the for-profit institutions that seem much more likely to accept large first year classes with the intent to kick a good percentage of them out after paying tuition.
Title: Re: First Concord-Educated Attorneys Admitted to U.S. Supreme Court Bar
Post by: thorc954 on April 07, 2008, 08:15:24 PM
okay, true, that makes sense.  Id add regents though to your list of Tier 4's though.
Title: Re: First Concord-Educated Attorneys Admitted to U.S. Supreme Court Bar
Post by: jd2008 on April 09, 2008, 03:56:35 PM
I say good to anyone that can make it at any of the schools. I personally plan to attend a physical campus if possible but am keeping all of my options open. I am glad that new college closed before I started and not after though since they were my #2 choice. Cooley is ABA approved and looks like they may take me in the fall anyways. My only concern with distance learning is that I wouldn't be good enough to pass the "mini-bar" the first year. Others can like the concord judges, so I respect them even more than ABA graduates who got to skip it. It should also be noted that state accredited non ABA colleges are exempt from mini bar too though.
Title: Re: First Concord-Educated Attorneys Admitted to U.S. Supreme Court Bar
Post by: thorc954 on April 09, 2008, 07:03:48 PM
JD2008, if you go to cooley and get any financial stuff, just be cognizant of the fact that it may disappear after the first year.  Either way though, good luck :)
Title: Re: First Concord-Educated Attorneys Admitted to U.S. Supreme Court Bar
Post by: jd2008 on April 14, 2008, 03:49:12 PM
how so?

quote author=thorc954 link=topic=9404.msg76835#msg76835 date=1207793028]
JD2008, if you go to cooley and get any financial stuff, just be cognizant of the fact that it may disappear after the first year.  Either way though, good luck :)
[/quote]
Title: Re: First Concord-Educated Attorneys Admitted to U.S. Supreme Court Bar
Post by: thorc954 on April 14, 2008, 04:36:18 PM
how so?

quote author=thorc954 link=topic=9404.msg76835#msg76835 date=1207793028]
JD2008, if you go to cooley and get any financial stuff, just be cognizant of the fact that it may disappear after the first year.  Either way though, good luck :)
[/quote]

well, cooley has a fail curve and there are rumors that the stack their sections (one section having mostly scholarship kids so inevitably some are at the bottom of the class despite performing well).  so, its highly likely that if you get an merit based aid it will be gone after the first year.  This is just something to consider if you are pursuing cooley over another option solely because of a perceived advantage in cost.  Not saying that you will lose the money or that its definite that they have that practice, but its certainly something to keep in mind.
Title: Re: First Concord-Educated Attorneys Admitted to U.S. Supreme Court Bar
Post by: jd2008 on April 15, 2008, 12:12:26 PM
Thanks for the info. I will keep it in mind


well, cooley has a fail curve and there are rumors that the stack their sections (one section having mostly scholarship kids so inevitably some are at the bottom of the class despite performing well).  so, its highly likely that if you get an merit based aid it will be gone after the first year.  This is just something to consider if you are pursuing cooley over another option solely because of a perceived advantage in cost.  Not saying that you will lose the money or that its definite that they have that practice, but its certainly something to keep in mind.
[/quote]
Title: Re: First Concord-Educated Attorneys Admitted to U.S. Supreme Court Bar
Post by: StevePirates on April 23, 2008, 04:40:33 PM
I'm going to have to disagree slightly with thorc954. Not every T3 and T4 should be disbanded. But all private for-profit one should. After the purge, the following T4 schools would remain: CUNY--Queens College, North Carolina Central University, Southern University (really cheap), University of North Dakota and University of the District of Columbia. I did not go through the T3's but many of them should go as well.

California Western is non-profit.
Title: Re: First Concord-Educated Attorneys Admitted to U.S. Supreme Court Bar
Post by: Parradox on April 24, 2008, 07:56:46 AM
Great discussion!

I agree with Undisputed in this matter. Not all of us wish to engage in the typical practice of law and have established careers; I personally want my JD in lieu of a master's degree. Also, not all of us live near a part-time ABA accredited school nor can we sell our homes, take a sabbatical from work to relocate our families to a viable ABA school. As an example, I am in the military...there is no way I can even satisfy the residency requirements of admission for most schools before I am relocated by uncle sam (never mind actually staying long enough to complete my studies). 

What is undisputed are the financial and employment limitations that attending ANY non ABA accredited school impose (right or wrong). Attending an ABA school is ideal and should be ones first choice...but it is encouraging to see progress and in roads being made within the legal profession by Concord grads.
Title: Re: First Concord-Educated Attorneys Admitted to U.S. Supreme Court Bar
Post by: thorc954 on April 24, 2008, 08:03:47 AM
If you want a JD in lieu of a masters why dont you actually get a JD instead of a crappy/expensive piece of paper from a fake school?
Title: Re: First Concord-Educated Attorneys Admitted to U.S. Supreme Court Bar
Post by: Parradox on April 26, 2008, 10:06:08 PM
If you want a JD in lieu of a masters why dont you actually get a JD instead of a crappy/expensive piece of paper from a fake school?

Did you even read my post? I thought I clearly stated my reasons for attending a fake school. Believe me, if I could actually attend a crappy real live cheap accredited law school at night - I would!

BTW, there are dozens of unaccredited (fake?) law schools throughout the country that only allow you to sit for the bar in that particular state. Conocrd just happens to be the first totaly online fake law school that has somehow duped the US Supreme Court into accepting its legitimacy. 
Title: Re: First Concord-Educated Attorneys Admitted to U.S. Supreme Court Bar
Post by: Challenger3 on March 15, 2009, 12:45:18 PM
If you want a JD in lieu of a masters why dont you actually get a JD instead of a crappy/expensive piece of paper from a fake school?
I got one or two questions for you. What is the difference in the Faculties of these schools? Do they also give fake instructions?
Title: Re: First Concord-Educated Attorneys Admitted to U.S. Supreme Court Bar
Post by: thorc954 on March 15, 2009, 03:04:12 PM
If you want a JD in lieu of a masters why dont you actually get a JD instead of a crappy/expensive piece of paper from a fake school?
I got one or two questions for you. What is the difference in the Faculties of these schools? Do they also give fake instructions?

My post is like three months old.  Im not re-reading this crap so that I can have an enlightened argument with you.  Online schools dont have the quality of professors and dont provide any job opportunities.  Thats it.  Its a scam and people should seriously think twice about signing up for anything like that.  Non-T14 schools are a huge gamble as it is, unaccredited online schools are almost not even a gamble.  They are a virtually guaranteed loss.
Title: Re: First Concord-Educated Attorneys Admitted to U.S. Supreme Court Bar
Post by: new2law on June 07, 2009, 10:41:46 PM
Guys, I am an ABA student myself. That being said not all are "fake". Novus is, novus is fake and should be illegal. Taft is DETC accredited and if the US army reconises DETC to make rank and officer status than who are we to tell the army they are wrong?

As for the cry babies who need "regional accrediting" remember that Concord merged with Kaplan and I check with their accrediting agency, that means that Concord is now Regionally accredited. Accept it and move on.