Law School Discussion

Law Students => Current Law Students => Topic started by: yourfriend on May 01, 2006, 05:36:25 PM

Title: EXAMS' TIME: STUDY AS LESS AS YOU CAN
Post by: yourfriend on May 01, 2006, 05:36:25 PM
Remember: Since you are graded relative to your peers, the harder you work, the more difficult it becomes to ensure a decent GPA under the forced curve (because the curve is a measure of performance relative to your classmates). If you study hard, everyone will study even harder. It becomes a vicious cycle!
Title: Re: EXAMS' TIME: STUDY AS LESS AS YOU CAN
Post by: peepshow on May 02, 2006, 08:31:58 PM
You have clearly followed your own advice, particularly in those important English classes.
Title: Re: EXAMS' TIME: STUDY AS LESS AS YOU CAN
Post by: sitonit on May 03, 2006, 05:09:52 AM
hahaha you didn't actually get what the post was saying, lol
Title: Re: EXAMS' TIME: STUDY AS LESS AS YOU CAN
Post by: Jumboshrimps on May 03, 2006, 09:32:00 AM
I'm studying lesser and lesser each day.
Title: Re: EXAMS' TIME: STUDY AS LESS AS YOU CAN
Post by: oblada on May 03, 2006, 09:36:29 AM
Actually, I am under the impression that this thread's title get translated in the subconscious of everyone as "Study as hard as you can!"
Title: Re: EXAMS' TIME: STUDY AS LESS AS YOU CAN
Post by: emil on May 04, 2006, 04:37:09 PM
Wow, oblada, quite interesting! Sometimes I guess you've to take people at their word!
Title: Re: EXAMS' TIME: STUDY AS LESS AS YOU CAN
Post by: shimra on May 04, 2006, 06:47:43 PM
Remember: Since you are graded relative to your peers, the harder you work, the more difficult it becomes to ensure a decent GPA under the forced curve (because the curve is a measure of performance relative to your classmates). If you study hard, everyone will study even harder. It becomes a vicious cycle!

This is like when everyone told me they were simultaneously dropping their books at 2:00, and I ended up being the only one who did it?

Oh, the humiliation. 
Title: Re: EXAMS' TIME: STUDY AS LESS AS YOU CAN
Post by: Christine on May 08, 2006, 05:18:31 PM
BUMP
Title: Re: EXAMS' TIME: STUDY AS LESS AS YOU CAN
Post by: come out on May 10, 2006, 04:49:37 AM
What the f**ck!?
Title: Re: EXAMS' TIME: STUDY AS LESS AS YOU CAN
Post by: 8 on May 10, 2006, 04:16:40 PM
Wow, oblada, quite interesting! Sometimes I guess you've to take people at their word!

Unfortunately people never do, emil ..
Title: Re: EXAMS' TIME: STUDY AS LESS AS YOU CAN
Post by: mixinmark on May 12, 2006, 06:31:09 AM
Wow, interesting thoughts here!
Title: Re: EXAMS' TIME: STUDY AS LESS AS YOU CAN
Post by: happymothers on May 13, 2006, 05:59:21 PM
Remember: Since you are graded relative to your peers, the harder you work, the more difficult it becomes to ensure a decent GPA under the forced curve (because the curve is a measure of performance relative to your classmates). If you study hard, everyone will study even harder. It becomes a vicious cycle!

How do you know this is not already happening?! I mean, students slacking off the second semester and beyond?!
Title: Re: EXAMS' TIME: STUDY AS LESS AS YOU CAN
Post by: goldenchain on May 17, 2006, 09:13:19 PM
LOL happy! ;)
Title: Re: EXAMS' TIME: STUDY AS LESS AS YOU CAN
Post by: studentloan on August 17, 2006, 05:06:30 AM
(http://www.cartoonstock.com/lowres/jmo1462l.jpg)
Title: Re: EXAMS' TIME: STUDY AS LESS AS YOU CAN
Post by: PaperChase on August 17, 2006, 09:45:19 AM
Have you ever tried, audiocasefiles


www.audiocasefiles.com
Title: Re: EXAMS' TIME: STUDY AS LESS AS YOU CAN
Post by: AudioCaseFiles on August 17, 2006, 10:08:45 AM
Every day I study more than the next.
Title: Re: EXAMS' TIME: STUDY AS LESS AS YOU CAN
Post by: french kiss on August 18, 2006, 06:23:08 AM

(http://www.cartoonstock.com/lowres/jmo1462l.jpg)


LOL ... Reverse psychology .. Kinda similar to the way the the world-wide protests against 2003 war with Iraq actually provoked Bush into going out and doing it his way sooner than he might have ... This principle can be stated as a simple matter of dog training: point out what you don't want -- and he will do it.

As often as one says "I am against war," he is actually sending out to the listener and the cosmic vibes the concept of war. He wants to provide as little attention and energy to what seems to be a problem and as much attention and energy to what seems to offer resolution. One tries not to be 'against' things but rather 'for' an alternative.
Title: Re: EXAMS' TIME: STUDY AS LESS AS YOU CAN
Post by: jljnk on August 19, 2006, 06:11:02 AM
Are you at least of legal drinking age so that we can believe you?
Title: Re: EXAMS' TIME: STUDY AS LESS AS YOU CAN
Post by: washthesoap on September 01, 2006, 03:37:30 AM
You mean 21?
Title: Re: EXAMS' TIME: STUDY AS LESS AS YOU CAN
Post by: critical mass on September 04, 2006, 06:17:22 PM
LOL wash! ;)
Title: Re: EXAMS' TIME: STUDY AS LESS AS YOU CAN
Post by: sowle on September 06, 2006, 02:49:54 AM
0.5
Title: Re: EXAMS' TIME: STUDY AS LESS AS YOU CAN
Post by: seine on September 09, 2006, 05:33:29 AM
No need to go in decimals ..
Title: Re: EXAMS' TIME: STUDY AS LESS AS YOU CAN
Post by: undertheimpression on September 10, 2006, 06:53:38 AM
;) seine!
Title: Re: EXAMS' TIME: STUDY AS LESS AS YOU CAN
Post by: niels on September 12, 2006, 08:18:14 AM
12 > 11.5 > 11 ... the worst is over. or is it?
Title: Re: EXAMS' TIME: STUDY AS LESS AS YOU CAN
Post by: melissa on September 13, 2006, 04:08:20 PM
(http://joepixel.com/common/images_blog/stick_people_R.gif)
Title: Re: EXAMS' TIME: STUDY AS LESS AS YOU CAN
Post by: pseude on October 05, 2006, 09:55:53 PM
;)
Title: Re: EXAMS' TIME: STUDY AS LESS AS YOU CAN
Post by: ellaine on October 06, 2006, 02:05:57 AM
Remember: Since you are graded relative to your peers, the harder you work, the more difficult it becomes to ensure a decent GPA under the forced curve (because the curve is a measure of performance relative to your classmates). If you study hard, everyone will study even harder. It becomes a vicious cycle!

How do you know this is not already happening?!


Exactly my thoughts, happymothers!

Title: Re: EXAMS' TIME: STUDY AS LESS AS YOU CAN
Post by: titntit on November 06, 2006, 06:07:39 AM

(http://www.cartoonstock.com/lowres/jmo1462l.jpg)


This principle can be stated as a simple matter of dog training: point out what you don't want -- and he will do it.


Ivan Petrovich Pavlov conducted some experiments like this I've read. Pavlov's description on how animals (and humans) can be trained to respond in a certain way to a particular stimulus drew tremendous interest from the time he first presented his results. His work paved the way for a new, more objective method of studying behavior. So-called Pavlovian training has been used in many fields, with anti-phobia treatment as but one example. An important principle in conditioned learning is that an established conditioned response (salivating in the case of the dogs) decreases in intensity if the conditioned stimulus (bell) is repeatedly presented without the unconditioned stimulus (food). This process is called extinction.

In order to treat phobias evoked by certain environmental situations, such as heights or crowds, this phenomenon can be used. The patient is first taught a muscle relaxation technique. Then he or she is told , over a period of days, to imagine the fear-producing situation while trying to inhibit the anxiety by relaxation. At the end of the series, the strongest anxiety-provoking situation may be brought to mind without anxiety. This process is called systematic desensitization.

Conditioning forms the basis of much of learned human behavior. Nowadays, this knowledge has also been exploited by commercial advertising. An effective commercial should be able to manipulate the response to a stimulus (like seeing a product's name) which initially does not provoke any feeling. The objective is to train people to make the "false" connection between positive emotions (e.g. happiness or feeling attractive) and the particular brand of consumer goods being advertised.
Title: Re: EXAMS' TIME: STUDY AS LESS AS YOU CAN
Post by: search on December 04, 2006, 01:50:29 AM
Very interesting, titntit!
Title: Re: EXAMS' TIME: STUDY AS LESS AS YOU CAN
Post by: twoways on December 07, 2006, 02:49:18 AM
Your funny search!
Title: Re: EXAMS' TIME: STUDY AS LESS AS YOU CAN
Post by: adrenaline on April 24, 2007, 12:32:53 AM

LOL ... Reverse psychology .. Kinda similar to the way the the world-wide protests against 2003 war with Iraq actually provoked Bush into going out and doing it his way sooner than he might have ... This principle can be stated as a simple matter of dog training: point out what you don't want -- and he will do it.

As often as one says "I am against war," he is actually sending out to the listener and the cosmic vibes the concept of war. He wants to provide as little attention and energy to what seems to be a problem and as much attention and energy to what seems to offer resolution. One tries not to be 'against' things but rather 'for' an alternative.


;)
Title: Re: EXAMS' TIME: STUDY AS LESS AS YOU CAN
Post by: Santa Baby on August 18, 2007, 09:30:20 PM

This principle can be stated as a simple matter of dog training: point out what you don't want -- and he will do it.


Ivan Petrovich Pavlov conducted some experiments like this I've read. Pavlov's description on how animals (and humans) can be trained to respond in a certain way to a particular stimulus drew tremendous interest from the time he first presented his results. His work paved the way for a new, more objective method of studying behavior. So-called Pavlovian training has been used in many fields, with anti-phobia treatment as but one example. An important principle in conditioned learning is that an established conditioned response (salivating in the case of the dogs) decreases in intensity if the conditioned stimulus (bell) is repeatedly presented without the unconditioned stimulus (food). This process is called extinction.

In order to treat phobias evoked by certain environmental situations, such as heights or crowds, this phenomenon can be used. The patient is first taught a muscle relaxation technique. Then he or she is told , over a period of days, to imagine the fear-producing situation while trying to inhibit the anxiety by relaxation. At the end of the series, the strongest anxiety-provoking situation may be brought to mind without anxiety. This process is called systematic desensitization.

Conditioning forms the basis of much of learned human behavior. Nowadays, this knowledge has also been exploited by commercial advertising. An effective commercial should be able to manipulate the response to a stimulus (like seeing a product's name) which initially does not provoke any feeling. The objective is to train people to make the "false" connection between positive emotions (e.g. happiness or feeling attractive) and the particular brand of consumer goods being advertised.


Is Pavlov with his findings the one that influenced B.F. Skinner?
Title: Re: EXAMS' TIME: STUDY AS LESS AS YOU CAN
Post by: apocryphal on August 19, 2007, 06:05:03 PM
You bet, Santa!
Title: Re: EXAMS' TIME: STUDY AS LESS AS YOU CAN
Post by: avocation on August 19, 2007, 07:50:48 PM
Exactly, in Pavlov's footsteps Skinner even invented the "operant conditioning chamber." Skinner was a tool of the cryptocracy out to turn people into "obedient automatons."
Title: Re: EXAMS' TIME: STUDY AS LESS AS YOU CAN
Post by: matty on August 20, 2007, 09:03:58 PM
Get free outlines at http://www.lawschoolstuff.net
Title: Re: EXAMS' TIME: STUDY AS LESS AS YOU CAN
Post by: V e r a on December 05, 2007, 01:57:51 PM
Skinner had the "wonderful" idea to bring up his daughter in a Skinner Box. How anyone could admire this man is beyond me. His book, "Walden Two," is a utopian presentation of how he imagined the application of his theories would work out in real life. Of course, they never have worked out in real life despite his assertions and beliefs. In "Beyond Freedom and Dignity," Skinner put forth the notion that Man had no indwelling personality, nor will, intention, self-determinism or personal responsibility, and that modern concepts of freedom and dignity have to fall away so Man could be intelligently controlled to behave as he should. Despite the fact of the degree of implied human degradation involved, the question always remained just who would decide what Man should be, how he should act, and who would control the controllers? In a traditional behavioral approach, Skinner followed in the footsteps of Pavlov and Watson. This view postulates that the subject matter of human psychology is only the behavior of the human being. Behaviorism claims that consciousness is neither a definite nor a usable concept. The behaviorist holds, further, that belief in the existence of consciousness goes back to the ancient days of superstition and magic and is useless.
Title: Re: EXAMS' TIME: STUDY AS LESS AS YOU CAN
Post by: Natalie on February 12, 2008, 10:43:41 AM

Skinner had the "wonderful" idea to bring up his daughter in a Skinner Box. How anyone could admire this man is beyond me. His book, "Walden Two," is a utopian presentation of how he imagined the application of his theories would work out in real life. Of course, they never have worked out in real life despite his assertions and beliefs. In "Beyond Freedom and Dignity," Skinner put forth the notion that Man had no indwelling personality, nor will, intention, self-determinism or personal responsibility, and that modern concepts of freedom and dignity have to fall away so Man could be intelligently controlled to behave as he should. Despite the fact of the degree of implied human degradation involved, the question always remained just who would decide what Man should be, how he should act, and who would control the controllers? In a traditional behavioral approach, Skinner followed in the footsteps of Pavlov and Watson. This view postulates that the subject matter of human psychology is only the behavior of the human being. Behaviorism claims that consciousness is neither a definite nor a usable concept. The behaviorist holds, further, that belief in the existence of consciousness goes back to the ancient days of superstition and magic and is useless.


A response to behaviorism was cognitive revolution in psychology. One of its main ideas was that by studying and developing successful functions in artificial intelligence and computer science, it becomes possible to make testable inferences about human mental processes. This has been called the reverse-engineering approach. It was not a revolution against behaviorism with the aim of transforming behaviorism into a better way of pursuing psychology by adding a little mentalism to it.

The cognitive approach was brought to prominence by Donald Broadbent's book "Perception and Communication" in 1958. The publication of the book "Cognitive Psychology" by Ulric Neisser in 1967 is also considered an important milestone. Other influential researchers included Noam Chomsky, Herbert Simon and Allen Newell. The cognitive revolution reached its height in the 1980s with publications by philosophers such as Daniel Dennett and artificial intelligence experts like Douglas Hofstadter. Proponents of the movement often cite Chomskian linguistics as an impetus for behaviorism's falling from popular favor. It should be noted, though, that the term "behaviorism" is an umbrella term that encompasses multiple approaches towards behavior. At the time the revolution occurred, the popular "behaviorism" was Kenneth Spence and Clark Hull's Stimulus-Response psychology. Radical behaviorists continued to hold to Skinner's behaviorist model of language acquisition, which some have argued was not adequately refuted by Chomsky's anti-behaviorist arguments.

The rejection of mental states by the behaviorists was based on a philosophical concept known as Occam's Razor. It states that a theory should make the fewest assumptions possible while still accounting for known data. Radical behaviorists argue that data can be accounted for by using observable phenomena and that there is no need to assume a "mental" world exists at a metaphysical level. Cognitive psychologists argued in response that experimental investigation of mental states do allow scientists to produce theories that more reliably predict outcomes. Modern neuroimaging technology has made it possible to observe brain states, but how these correspond to mental structures is still a challenge. The success of the cognitive scientists in predicting and describing human behavior prevailed over the strict behaviorist approach. By the early 1980s the cognitive approach had become the dominant research line in many of the (applied) psychology research fields.

Major research areas in cognitive psychology

Perception



Categorization


Memory



Knowledge representation


Numerical cognition

Language



Thinking

Title: Re: EXAMS' TIME: STUDY AS LESS AS YOU CAN
Post by: accosta on April 14, 2008, 01:05:35 PM

Memory

    [...]
    • False memories

     
I saw an interesting post on false memories on another thread .. lemme see if I find it - I may edit my post to include the link here :)

http://www.lawschooldiscussion.org/students/index.php/topic,3243.msg76250.html#msg76250[/list]
Title: Re: EXAMS' TIME: STUDY AS LESS AS YOU CAN
Post by: LawstCause on April 15, 2008, 06:34:02 AM
"Psych majors suck balls.   Majorly."  I believe it was Freud who said that.  I find it was the only valid statement ever made by him, and when those psych majors grow up to be attorneys, they tend to increase in their overall ability to suck exponentially.
Title: Re: EXAMS' TIME: STUDY AS LESS AS YOU CAN
Post by: 1LMan on April 15, 2008, 07:47:21 AM
Back to the original purpose of this thread: As sad as it is, there often is no correlation between how hard one studies and their grades.  Sure, there is the whole "study smart, not hard" argument.  However, the reality is in law school you will often get grades you never anticipated after taking an exam.  It's the most arbitrary system ever in most law schools and it is just something one deals with.
Title: Re: EXAMS' TIME: STUDY AS LESS AS YOU CAN
Post by: thorc954 on April 15, 2008, 10:11:05 AM
Back to the original purpose of this thread: As sad as it is, there often is no correlation between how hard one studies and their grades.  Sure, there is the whole "study smart, not hard" argument.  However, the reality is in law school you will often get grades you never anticipated after taking an exam.  It's the most arbitrary system ever in most law schools and it is just something one deals with.

agreed.  completely arbitrary.

I spent five days straight (after finishing my outline) studying for an exam last semester only to find out that somehow some of the students in the class got a hold on the answer key to the exam (another professor gave out our exam as a practice exam for his class).  Anyway, five days of studying was enough for an average grade in that class when that other crap was factored in.
Title: Re: EXAMS' TIME: STUDY AS LESS AS YOU CAN
Post by: superpartner on April 16, 2008, 12:09:34 PM

Memory

    [...]
    • False memories

     
I saw an interesting post on false memories on another thread .. lemme see if I find it - I may edit my post to include the link here :)

http://www.lawschooldiscussion.org/students/index.php/topic,3243.msg76250.html#msg76250

Thanks for the link accosta!
Title: Re: EXAMS' TIME: STUDY AS LESS AS YOU CAN
Post by: talkshowhost on April 18, 2008, 01:48:55 AM
Time spent studying definitely impacts the range of grades one can expect on an exam, albeit to a limited extent.  Look at it in extremes -- the guy who spends 6 months studying torts is going to do better than the guy who started studying Monday.  Nobody disputes this.  And yet if this is true, the same logic applies to the projected grade ranges for the student who studied 6 weeks before exams and the student who pulled 4 all nighters the week before -- intelligence and other external factors aside, the former will always do better.

Sure there is an arbitrary element to law school grading, but it's NOT a complete crapshoot.  The people who say this are the medians who get an occasional A and an occasional B minus -- the assertion supports their experience, but by no means reflects the truth.  The more time one spends going over practice exams and model answers the better one prepares one's self to spot issues and re-create arguments.   HTH
Title: Re: EXAMS' TIME: STUDY AS LESS AS YOU CAN
Post by: UGAfootballfanatic on April 19, 2008, 06:40:21 AM
Time spent studying definitely impacts the range of grades one can expect on an exam, albeit to a limited extent.  Look at it in extremes -- the guy who spends 6 months studying torts is going to do better than the guy who started studying Monday.  Nobody disputes this.  And yet if this is true, the same logic applies to the projected grade ranges for the student who studied 6 weeks before exams and the student who pulled 4 all nighters the week before -- intelligence and other external factors aside, the former will always do better.

Sure there is an arbitrary element to law school grading, but it's NOT a complete crapshoot.  The people who say this are the medians who get an occasional A and an occasional B minus -- the assertion supports their experience, but by no means reflects the truth.  The more time one spends going over practice exams and model answers the better one prepares one's self to spot issues and re-create arguments.   HTH
This logic only works if the two students were of relatively equal ability to begin with. Put me in a grade competition with a 1L from a 4th tier school and regardless of the study time, I will probably pwn him. OTOH, put in in the same competition with the top 5% at HYS and the same will certainly happen to me. Study time doesn't make up for stronger critical thinking and analysis skills.
Title: Re: EXAMS' TIME: STUDY AS LESS AS YOU CAN
Post by: The Artist on April 19, 2008, 02:25:38 PM
Time spent studying definitely impacts the range of grades one can expect on an exam, albeit to a limited extent.  Look at it in extremes -- the guy who spends 6 months studying torts is going to do better than the guy who started studying Monday.  Nobody disputes this.  And yet if this is true, the same logic applies to the projected grade ranges for the student who studied 6 weeks before exams and the student who pulled 4 all nighters the week before -- intelligence and other external factors aside, the former will always do better.

Sure there is an arbitrary element to law school grading, but it's NOT a complete crapshoot.  The people who say this are the medians who get an occasional A and an occasional B minus -- the assertion supports their experience, but by no means reflects the truth.  The more time one spends going over practice exams and model answers the better one prepares one's self to spot issues and re-create arguments.   HTH

Co-signed
Title: Re: EXAMS' TIME: STUDY AS LESS AS YOU CAN
Post by: StevePirates on April 19, 2008, 08:15:55 PM
This logic only works if the two students were of relatively equal ability to begin with. Put me in a grade competition with a 1L from a 4th tier school and regardless of the study time, I will probably pwn him. OTOH, put in in the same competition with the top 5% at HYS and the same will certainly happen to me. Study time doesn't make up for stronger critical thinking and analysis skills.

Not everyone in the T4 is a complete slouch you know.  Put you in with an average person from the T4 and sure, but the people who are on full ride at the T4 are usually pretty bright.  They either chose T4 because they didn't quite understand how the rankings would impact their career opportunities, or they had a specific goal in mind that didn't require a prestige degree. 

Not to turn this into another T14 v. TTTTTTTXYZY thread, just sayin' the over generalization a lot of people use about the students at T3/T4 would be less inflammatory if it wasn't so..... over generalized.
Title: Re: EXAMS' TIME: STUDY AS LESS AS YOU CAN
Post by: talkshowhost on April 20, 2008, 03:07:09 AM
Time spent studying definitely impacts the range of grades one can expect on an exam, albeit to a limited extent.  Look at it in extremes -- the guy who spends 6 months studying torts is going to do better than the guy who started studying Monday.  Nobody disputes this.  And yet if this is true, the same logic applies to the projected grade ranges for the student who studied 6 weeks before exams and the student who pulled 4 all nighters the week before -- intelligence and other external factors aside, the former will always do better.

Sure there is an arbitrary element to law school grading, but it's NOT a complete crapshoot.  The people who say this are the medians who get an occasional A and an occasional B minus -- the assertion supports their experience, but by no means reflects the truth.  The more time one spends going over practice exams and model answers the better one prepares one's self to spot issues and re-create arguments.   HTH


This logic only works if the two students were of relatively equal ability to begin with. Put me in a grade competition with a 1L from a 4th tier school and regardless of the study time, I will probably pwn him. OTOH, put in in the same competition with the top 5% at HYS and the same will certainly happen to me. Study time doesn't make up for stronger critical thinking and analysis skills.

The students at any given school are not competing against students from different tiers of schools or of vastly differing ranges of intelligence (generally speaking), so your point is moot.

Title: Re: EXAMS' TIME: STUDY AS LESS AS YOU CAN
Post by: scrap on April 29, 2008, 12:07:37 PM

I saw an interesting post on false memories on another thread .. lemme see if I find it - I may edit my post to include the link here :)

http://www.lawschooldiscussion.org/students/index.php/topic,3243.msg76250.html#msg76250


Funny as always, accosta! :)
Title: Re: EXAMS' TIME: STUDY AS LESS AS YOU CAN
Post by: revani on May 19, 2008, 11:40:22 AM

I saw an interesting post on false memories on another thread .. lemme see if I find it - I may edit my post to include the link here :)

http://www.lawschooldiscussion.org/students/index.php/topic,3243.msg76250.html#msg76250


Funny as always, accosta! :)


Sorry I do not get it -- what do you mean? What relevance does the link have to the postings?
Title: Re: EXAMS' TIME: STUDY AS LESS AS YOU CAN
Post by: non parata est on May 19, 2008, 12:40:57 PM
Time spent studying definitely impacts the range of grades one can expect on an exam, albeit to a limited extent.  Look at it in extremes -- the guy who spends 6 months studying torts is going to do better than the guy who started studying Monday.  Nobody disputes this.  And yet if this is true, the same logic applies to the projected grade ranges for the student who studied 6 weeks before exams and the student who pulled 4 all nighters the week before -- intelligence and other external factors aside, the former will always do better.

Sure there is an arbitrary element to law school grading, but it's NOT a complete crapshoot.  The people who say this are the medians who get an occasional A and an occasional B minus -- the assertion supports their experience, but by no means reflects the truth.  The more time one spends going over practice exams and model answers the better one prepares one's self to spot issues and re-create arguments.   HTH

Co-signed

Dude... you're an 0L.  How can you co-sign this?
Title: Re: EXAMS' TIME: STUDY AS LESS AS YOU CAN
Post by: s t u f f on August 08, 2008, 01:05:04 AM

Skinner had the "wonderful" idea to bring up his daughter in a Skinner Box. How anyone could admire this man is beyond me. His book, "Walden Two," is a utopian presentation of how he imagined the application of his theories would work out in real life. Of course, they never have worked out in real life despite his assertions and beliefs. In "Beyond Freedom and Dignity," Skinner put forth the notion that Man had no indwelling personality, nor will, intention, self-determinism or personal responsibility, and that modern concepts of freedom and dignity have to fall away so Man could be intelligently controlled to behave as he should. Despite the fact of the degree of implied human degradation involved, the question always remained just who would decide what Man should be, how he should act, and who would control the controllers? In a traditional behavioral approach, Skinner followed in the footsteps of Pavlov and Watson. This view postulates that the subject matter of human psychology is only the behavior of the human being. Behaviorism claims that consciousness is neither a definite nor a usable concept. The behaviorist holds, further, that belief in the existence of consciousness goes back to the ancient days of superstition and magic and is useless.


You can just imagine how effective a psychology like Skinner's could possibly be...
Title: Re: EXAMS' TIME: STUDY AS LESS AS YOU CAN
Post by: driven on August 08, 2008, 03:26:18 PM
You mean applied psychology...
Title: Re: EXAMS' TIME: STUDY AS LESS AS YOU CAN
Post by: OpaOpa on September 02, 2008, 05:13:00 PM
Some people just want what they can not have. Once they get it, they don't want it any more. For instance, if you tell 'em you love them, they will suddenly leave and you will never ever see them again. So, obviously, what you need to do is to keep the game going. Keep them guessing forever. Go late to appointments with them. Do not compliment them, just tell 'em they don't look that bad today, for instance. Be a tough mommy with them, correct their mistakes right away; do not say them directly you love them. Ever. Pretend you forgot their name off-hand if you absolutely need to tell them you like them. And if they insist you say you love them, sigh, shake your head. And don't forget the smell thing -- put it bluntly this time -- they don't smell like that.
Title: Re: EXAMS' TIME: STUDY AS LESS AS YOU CAN
Post by: marshallah on September 03, 2008, 04:54:52 PM

Some people just want what they can not have. Once they get it, they don't want it any more. For instance, if you tell 'em you love them, they will suddenly leave and you will never ever see them again. So, obviously, what you need to do is to keep the game going. Keep them guessing forever. Go late to appointments with them. Do not compliment them, just tell 'em they don't look that bad today, for instance. Be a tough mommy with them, correct their mistakes right away; do not say them directly you love them. Ever. Pretend you forgot their name off-hand if you absolutely need to tell them you like them. And if they insist you say you love them, sigh, shake your head. And don't forget the smell thing -- put it bluntly this time -- they don't smell like that.


HAHAHA- you're so funny OpaOpa! You summed it up real good the entire topic of this thread!
Title: Re: EXAMS' TIME: STUDY AS LESS AS YOU CAN
Post by: yshé on October 23, 2008, 03:31:28 PM

Wow, oblada, quite interesting! Sometimes I guess you've to take people at their word!


Two men were traveling together, when a Bear suddenly met them on their path.  One of them climbed up quickly into a tree and concealed himself in the branches.  The other, seeing that he must be attacked, fell flat on the ground, and when the Bear came up and felt him with his snout, and smelt him all over, he held his breath, and feigned the appearance of death as much as he could.  The Bear soon left him, for it is said he will not touch a dead body. When he was quite gone, the other Traveler descended from the tree, and jocularly inquired of his friend what it was the Bear had whispered in his ear. "He gave me this advice," his companion replied. "Never travel with a friend who deserts you at the approach of danger."
Title: Re: EXAMS' TIME: STUDY AS LESS AS YOU CAN
Post by: Morgan Page on December 08, 2008, 06:19:10 PM

I saw an interesting post on false memories on another thread .. lemme see if I find it - I may edit my post to include the link here :)

http://www.lawschooldiscussion.org/students/index.php/topic,3243.msg76250.html#msg76250


Funny as always, accosta! :)


Sorry I do not get it -- what do you mean? What relevance does the link have to the postings?


revani, they've messed up the links.. before April of this year everything was fine, but later on things got really weird in here..
Title: Re:
Post by: Stephanie K. on April 12, 2012, 06:18:14 PM
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[...] Like the kills of most successful snipers and fighter pilots, the vast majority of the killing done by these men were what some would call simple ambushes, and back shootings. No provocation, anger, or emotion empowered these killings.

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But of course - these are the kinds of nihilistic killers - there is a movie "Mr. Brooks" which depicts a guy who killed people for the hell of it..



Examining his modus operandi, from the fastidious preparation and cleaning up of the crime scene before departing, it looks like Brooks was obsessed with not getting caught (he responds to Smith's inquiry as to whether the person they would agree on killing could be someone who he knew, by saying, that you never kill someone you know, that's the surest way to get caught) - and yet, as Smith lies dying, Brooks reveals that he used many different MOs before becoming the meticulous Thumbprint Killer.

http://www.lawschooldiscussion.org/index.php?topic=3003846.msg5399998#msg5399998



Funny - les protagonistes - when Smith (the guy who wanted to see Brooks murder someone) told him before they were to enter the apt to commit the murders, he wanted to crap so badly - even more funny when he actually pissed on the scene - LOL!
Title: Re: Oppressed' "Displaced" Behavior
Post by: Chauffeur on April 14, 2012, 01:47:43 PM
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Those who authentically commit themselves to the people must re-examine themselves constantly. This conversion is so radical as not to allow of ambiguous behavior. To affirm this commitment but to consider oneself the proprietor of revolutionary wisdom -- which must then be given to (or imposed on) the people -- is to retain the old ways. The man or woman who proclaims devotion to the cause of liberation yet is unable to enter into communion with the people, whom he or she continues to regard as totally ignorant, is grievously self-deceived. The convert who approaches the people but feels alarm at each step they take, each doubt they express, and each suggestion they offer, and attempts to impose his "status," remains nostalgic towards his origins.

Only through comradeship with the oppressed can the converts understand their characteristic ways of living and behaving, which in diverse moments reflect the structure of domination. One of these characteristics is the above-mentioned existential duality of the oppressed, who are at the same time themselves and the oppressor whose image they have internalized. Accordingly, until they concretely "discover" their oppressor and in turn their own consciousness, they nearly always express fatalistic attitudes towards their situation. Fatalism is the guise of docility is the fruit of an historical and sociological situation, not an essential characteristic of a people's behavior. It almost always is related to the power of destiny or fate or fortune -- inevitable forces -- or to a distorted view of God. Under the sway of magic and myth, the oppressed see their suffering, the fruit of exploitation, as the will of God -- as if God were the creator of this "organized disorder."

Submerged in reality, the oppressed cannot perceive clearly the "order" which serves the interests of the oppressors whose image they have internalized. Chaffing under the restrictions of this order, they often manifest a type of horizontal violence, striking out at their own comrades for the pettiest reasons. This is the period when the niggers beat each other up. It is possible that in this behavior they are once more manifesting their duality. Because the oppressor exists within their oppressed comrades, when they attack those comrades they are indirectly attacking the oppressor as well.

On the other hand, at a certain point in their existential experience the oppressed feel an irresistible attraction towards the oppressors and their way of life. Sharing this way of life becomes an overpowering aspiration. In their alienation, the oppressed want at any cost to resemble the oppressors, to imitate them, to follow them. This phenomenon is especially prevalent in the middle-class oppressed, who yearn to be equal to the "eminent" men and women of the upper class.

Self-depreciation is another characteristic of the oppressed, which derives from their internalization of the opinion the oppressors hold of them. So often do they hear that they are good for nothing, know nothing and are incapable of learning anything -- that they are sick, lazy, and unproductive -- that in the end they become convinced of their own unfitness. They call themselves ignorant and say the "professor" is the one who has knowledge and to whom they should listen. The criteria of knowledge imposed upon them are the conventional ones. As long as the oppressed' ambiguity persists, the oppressed are reluctant to resist, and totally lack confidence in themselves. They have a diffuse, magical belief in the invulnerability and power of the oppressor. Not rarely the act of oppossing the boss provokes guilt feelings. The boss, in truth, is still "inside" you. The oppressed must see examples of the vulnerability of the oppressor so that a contrary conviction can begin to grow within them. Until this occurs, they will continue disheartened, fearful, and beaten. As long as the oppressed remain unaware of the causes of their condition, they fatalistically "accept" their exploitation.



Could you expand a bit on the "horizontal violence" kind of thing?

http://www.lawschooldiscussion.org/index.php?topic=3008253.msg5400208#msg5400208



Very simple, indeed - gauss - the post says it itself: it's time when niggers beat each-other up. It's not that deep down themselves they want to attack their comrades, but they do, because of their, shall we call, split, mentality - with this, maybe demonstrating on a symbolical level, that they want to attack, in actuality, the oppressor.