Law School Discussion

Law Students => Current Law Students => Topic started by: jasonseidman on March 08, 2006, 11:42:29 AM

Title: UDC
Post by: jasonseidman on March 08, 2006, 11:42:29 AM
What can people tell me about UDC DCSL...those who have gone there not those who want to tear a place down that they have never been to.  What did you like?  What did you hate?  would you recommend it?  anything else to help someone who has been offered admission but is yet unsure of going there
Title: Re: UDC
Post by: jasonseidman on March 08, 2006, 01:08:08 PM
anybody have an idea?
Title: Re: UDC
Post by: elemnopee on March 08, 2006, 02:12:22 PM
Strong Public Interest focus
Title: Re: UDC
Post by: jasonseidman on March 09, 2006, 06:11:30 AM
does anyone know anyting else
Title: Re: UDC
Post by: Erapitt on March 09, 2006, 06:26:21 AM
Its a low ranked school that isn't going to open many opportunities.  I don't think anybody outside of DC knows it exists really and in the district it falls behind GULC, GW, American, GMU, AND Catholic for jobs.

I personally think its a waste of your hard earned money.
Title: Re: UDC
Post by: jasonseidman on March 09, 2006, 06:39:47 AM
see my whole thing is that i work for a small firm, it has a large reputation though. we handle alot of high profile criminal defense cases. i dont want to say anything like nepetism or anything, but i would think that when i graduate they could at least pull a few strings to get me in for at least interviews if not a job with them. my gpa was 2.8 and lsat 151. nothing special just average.

But i am looking forward to going there, if i so choose. i am more worried about the law degree. i would rather be able to go there (UDC) full time and study my ass off and be one of the better students than go to seton hall or widener part time, and not have as much time to dedicate to my studies.

UDC has a law open house next saturday and i will be going and you can rest assured i will be probing with questions.

I think (hope) that once i have the law degree, and if i excell at this, that some of that will speak for itself. and then after that, and after some time put in, i will land a job that will be a good one

what are your thoughts on all of that?
Title: Re: UDC
Post by: CDunker on March 09, 2006, 08:02:43 AM
It would be a waste of money to go to UDC.  Like the other poster said, it's a low ranked school that doesn't even have the connections to get its grads jobs in the District.  If you want to work in DC, retake the LSAT and pray for Catholic.  If you want to work somewhere else, find a school in that state that will take you.  Going to UDC would be a HUGE mistake.
Title: Re: UDC
Post by: jasonseidman on March 09, 2006, 08:53:42 AM
i totally understand your point.  but why do we have to be so reliant upon our schools helpin getting us jobs.  i went to lafayette college, top 30 and the career services people were totally incompetent and couldnt help for anything.  i worked with them to get a job after graduation and they were of no help.  i then went on my own and found a job.  jobs are everywhere and i believe that if you prove yourself to excell in law school, and then pass the bar, you will tend to be on a more even playing field than everyone thinks.  regardless of how much everyone hates UDC, i am excited to start there in the fall. 
Title: Re: UDC
Post by: Erapitt on March 09, 2006, 10:52:34 AM
Jobs are not everywhere for lawyers lol.  If the firm you work for really does handle high profile cases (which I doubt based on your post) then they won't take someone from UDC, plain and simple.

Even Catholic is a rat race competing for jobs in DC.  Welcome to the legal world where rankings rule the world.
Title: Re: UDC
Post by: jasonseidman on March 09, 2006, 11:51:23 AM
no my firm handles quite a few large cases per year.  our latest was a racketeering case in brooklyn for the for a shipping union, now we represent a former senator in a large investigation agaisnt him, have handled most of the real estate closings in hoboken, and many others.  why would you doubt that. 

see my boss has realized one thing in his years as a lawyer.  he knows that while a harvard degree is a great asset, someone with a "lower ranked degree" but who is a better lawyer and who he believes will make him more money, will be the one that he hires.  a guy who goes to harvard but has trouble having a jury take a liking to him will not be as effective as a guy who goes to UDC or somewhere like that, but can actually win cases.
Title: Re: UDC
Post by: mecarr on March 09, 2006, 11:59:01 AM
I think it is still too early to judge UDC. It has just been accredited and its statistics jump around so much each year. But the plain and simple truth is that UDC is very strong in the public interest field. They require students to do over 400 hours of clinical work. Apparently during that time the students gain more contacts and experience than students who graduate from other schools.

I wonder where UDC will be in 10 years. Will it be better than Catholic or ranked where it is now? If worse comes to worse, you can always transfer too.
Title: Re: UDC
Post by: jasonseidman on March 09, 2006, 12:13:58 PM
I think it is still too early to judge UDC. It has just been accredited and its statistics jump around so much each year. But the plain and simple truth is that UDC is very strong in the public interest field. They require students to do over 400 hours of clinical work. Apparently during that time the students gain more contacts and experience than students who graduate from other schools.

I wonder where UDC will be in 10 years. Will it be better than Catholic or ranked where it is now? If worse comes to worse, you can always transfer too.


wow, thanks lawlaw.  it is nice to hear a word of encouragement from some peson about this.  people judge UDC so harshly, people are always afraid of change.  i will be going there (agaisnt the advice of many) in the fall and i couldnt be more excited.  i will be getting my law degree all the while helping people who really need some help.  so what if its not the best school in the counrty, once i graduate, i can prepare and sit for any bar in the country and then practice law.  i am not worried.  i am just trying to get some poeple who know anything about this school first hand to talk about it instead of people from GW or wherever who think of it as the small crappy school in the NW corner


thanks alot for someone sticking up for UDC
Title: Re: UDC
Post by: Erapitt on March 09, 2006, 12:15:48 PM
Yes, because since we are "from" GW, we don't know anything about the legal market.

You are a moron.  Have you even looked at their bar passage rate?  Its AWFUL!
Title: Re: UDC
Post by: jasonseidman on March 09, 2006, 12:44:50 PM
Yes, because since we are "from" GW, we don't know anything about the legal market.

You are a moron.  Have you even looked at their bar passage rate?  Its AWEFUL!



i said "i am just trying to get some poeple who know anything about this school first hand to talk about it instead of people from GW or wherever who think of it as the small crappy school in the NW corner" 

where in that did i say anything about GW and the job market.  i have nothing agaisnt GW, i wish i could go there.  but i cant, and to people that i know, i will not give them a report about the school, since i have no first hand knowledge. 


its spelled awful by the way


Title: Re: UDC
Post by: Erapitt on March 09, 2006, 12:49:54 PM
Thanks, sorry, quick typing = screw ups sometimes.  What can I say, I am the spell checker generation.

Anyway, the bottom line is the Bar Passage rate is crap.  Look at it, its like 34% or some trash.  That is horrible.
Title: Re: UDC
Post by: CDunker on March 09, 2006, 12:54:24 PM
The OP came here looking to hear that the school was good, and he won't accept the truth that the school is god-aweful and does a terrible job placing students in jobs. 

OP:
If you want to go there, go ahead.  Just don't come back crying when you are 100K+ in debt and can't even land a paralegal position.
Title: Re: UDC
Post by: jasonseidman on March 09, 2006, 01:10:22 PM
Thanks, sorry, quick typing = screw ups sometimes.  What can I say, I am the spell checker generation.

Anyway, the bottom line is the Bar Passage rate is crap.  Look at it, its like 34% or some trash.  That is horrible.
ok so it was 34 a few years ago, its somewhere in the 50's or 60's  now.  i dont care what the rest of the people will do on that exam, i will be one of the 34 or one of the 60 or one of the 20 whatever the stat may be.  i have always believed that what you get out of anything is directly related to the effort that you put in it.  if i study harder while in school, law and concepts of the law will be more of a first-hand nature to me, and studying for the bar will be a bit easier as i will know what is going on more than someone who went through the motions.  from what i have heard from most lawyers, a bar prep course is almost necessary anyways, so i am not worried.


The OP came here looking to hear that the school was good, and he won't accept the truth that the school is god-aweful and does a terrible job placing students in jobs. 

OP:
If you want to go there, go ahead.  Just don't come back crying when you are 100K+ in debt and can't even land a paralegal position.


i could take the truth, people who have not ever gone there have opinions that they have formed from second hand knowledge, you dont know about the quality of their education or the lawyers that they produce, you know what stats are.  i would rather go there and be in the top 3 in the class than go somewhere else and be middle of the pack because i had to work all day and couldnt focus 100% on studies.  i am not looking for my school to place me in a job.  when i went to lafayette college, they were *&^% at placing me in a job after school (i got it on my own) and they are a top 30 college. 



its a young school, give it time to develop

by the way - victim #2 on how to spell the word awful
Title: Re: UDC
Post by: Erapitt on March 09, 2006, 01:53:35 PM
Time to develop means like 10 years bro.  Even then it will be lucky to be Third Tier.  You posted on here looking for the answer you wanted to hear.  You and everyone else that goes there thinks they are going to be top 10% in their class.

Hate to break it to you but if you scored a 151 on your LSAT and a 2.8 UGPA, then obviously you aren't the brilliant genius you think you are. 

Go there if that is what you want.  Just don't be surprised when you can't find a job when you get out.
Title: Re: UDC
Post by: jasonseidman on March 09, 2006, 02:02:29 PM
Time to develop means like 10 years bro.  Even then it will be lucky to be Third Tier.  You posted on here looking for the answer you wanted to hear.  You and everyone else that goes there thinks they are going to be top 10% in their class.

Hate to break it to you but if you scored a 151 on your LSAT and a 2.8 UGPA, then obviously you aren't the brilliant genius you think you are. 

Go there if that is what you want.  Just don't be surprised when you can't find a job when you get out.


i didnt post an answer i wanted to hear...well actually i did want to hear that it was a good expierence (thats niehter here nor there), but i wanted to hear it from UDC DCSL students, not you.  if i had UDC students saying dont come here and all, that would be a different story.  but who are you to give any info about the school.  i need your opinion like a rash on my ass

my 2.8 - total relation to being a stupid freshman and sophomore being drunk far to often.  my junior + senior gpa was 3.6.  dont worry about me, just stop posting here so that maybe a UDC student can post here and give first hand knowledge
Title: Re: UDC
Post by: Erapitt on March 09, 2006, 02:12:12 PM
No UDC student is around.  They are all looking for jobs ROFL.

Gimme a break dude.  Regardless of what they say, its a *&^% school and the students there are below average on the LSAT, grades, and anything else.

Oh, and that partying excuse... You are a joke.  I partied all four years of college and still got my *&^% done.  Just because you are retarded, don't blame it on the booze.

Good luck with your trash JD.  I can give opinion on whatever I want.  My ideas are backed by fact.  FACT: UDC has a Maryland bar passage rate of 35% when the State's overall passage rate for first time test takers is 71%.  That is less than HALF the normal passage rate.

FACT: It is considered the bottom of a long list of law schools in the DC metro area

FACT: The NALP Directory only lists ONE on campus interview and that is the office of the DA for DC, and, I hate to break it to you, but the odds are slim to none regarding getting an ADA gig out of that school when you are competing against GULC, GW, and every other big named school that has interest in getting a job as an ADA.

Those are the facts.  I could list more, but those are more than enough reasons not to go there.
Title: Re: UDC
Post by: jasonseidman on March 09, 2006, 02:40:32 PM
No UDC student is around.  They are all looking for jobs ROFL.

Gimme a break dude.  Regardless of what they say, its a *&^% school and the students there are below average on the LSAT, grades, and anything else.

Oh, and that partying excuse... You are a joke.  I partied all four years of college and still got my *&^% done.  Just because you are retarded, don't blame it on the booze.

Good luck with your trash JD.  I can give opinion on whatever I want.  My ideas are backed by fact.  FACT: UDC has a Maryland bar passage rate of 35% when the State's overall passage rate for first time test takers is 71%.  That is less than HALF the normal passage rate.

FACT: It is considered the bottom of a long list of law schools in the DC metro area

FACT: The NALP Directory only lists ONE on campus interview and that is the office of the DA for DC, and, I hate to break it to you, but the odds are slim to none regarding getting an ADA gig out of that school when you are competing against GULC, GW, and every other big named school that has interest in getting a job as an ADA.

Those are the facts.  I could list more, but those are more than enough reasons not to go there.

you strike me as a very mature person.  as far as the JD, once you pass the bar and start to practice, your reputation speaks louder than your degree. 

where are your bar stats from?  do you have a link, i would be interested to look.  i was under the impression that they were in the 30's a few years ago, and that one of the reasons that they got accredation again was because their bar passage rate had jumped.  i will be going there next week so i will be sure to ask and i will let you know FIRST HAND INFORMATION.

if you dont mind my asking, where do you go to school

how is it a fact that it is considered at the bottom of the list, wouldnt that be an opinion?

as i have said many times, i am not concerned about a school finding me a job, i am able enough to go do a job search, and not need someone to hand feed me interviews. 

oh and by the way, if boozing didnt hinder your studies, you didnt party hard enough

Title: Re: UDC
Post by: Erapitt on March 09, 2006, 02:46:57 PM
www.lsac.org look at the aba guide to law schools.  Look up UDC, click it, and look at the bar information for the passage rate.

Regarding how it is a fact that it is at the bottom: It is ranked as such and it is not well respected in the legal community.  That is proved by looking at how not one single firm recruits on campus.  Its not the idea of the school handing you interviews.  Any good firm isn't even going to GIVE you an interview on your own.  You miss the point.  You might think that prestiege doesn't mean anything but a large chunk of American lawyers do.  The business is run on reputation and UDC just doesn't have that reputation.  Its a fact.  You are not going to have the same job opportunities as I will coming out of GW, or Catholic, or even a third tier like Howard. 

I will be attending GW Law in the Fall.  I am not currently a student.  I graduated a bit ago and currently am employed with the federal government in the contracts field. 

Just because I tell it like it is does not mean I am not mature.  I am not going to get in a pissing contest with you.  I told you a list of facts and even now you cannot accept them.
Title: Re: UDC
Post by: jasonseidman on March 09, 2006, 02:53:47 PM
www.lsac.org look at the aba guide to law schools.  Look up UDC, click it, and look at the bar information for the passage rate.

Regarding how it is a fact that it is at the bottom: It is ranked as such and it is not well respected in the legal community.  That is proved by looking at how not one single firm recruits on campus.  Its not the idea of the school handing you interviews.  Any good firm isn't even going to GIVE you an interview on your own.  You miss the point.  You might think that prestiege doesn't mean anything but a large chunk of American lawyers do.  The business is run on reputation and UDC just doesn't have that reputation.  Its a fact.  You are not going to have the same job opportunities as I will coming out of GW, or Catholic, or even a third tier like Howard. 

I will be attending GW Law in the Fall.  I am not currently a student.  I graduated a bit ago and currently am employed with the federal government in the contracts field. 

Just because I tell it like it is does not mean I am not mature.  I am not going to get in a pissing contest with you.  I told you a list of facts and even now you cannot accept them.

right so like i said to you, those are stats from 2003!!!
 what are the stats from the last bar exam

but its ok, i will just wait for a UDC student to answer my questions, your facts still havent provedanything to me.  i am done listen to you misrepresent facts and state opinions that have no relevancy to me
Title: Re: UDC
Post by: Erapitt on March 09, 2006, 02:58:21 PM
You are a lost cause.  The information regarding firms recruitment is right on the NALP directory.  Do a search. 

If you want to talk to a UDC student that badly, the smart thing to do would be to call the school and go speak with a few.  Oh wait, I forgot, you aren't smart.
Title: Re: UDC
Post by: mecarr on March 09, 2006, 06:36:10 PM
What is up with this intense hate of UDC? As far as the bar pass rates are concerned, you all need to look behind the statistic to get the full story. The fact of the matter is that most of the people over the past few years who graduated UDC did not have enough money to take any bar-prep courses. Also they are usually older students with families and other jobs who were not able to devote as much time to studying for the bar as younger students from other law schools.

One person said something about going there and being $100,000 in debt after you graduate. That's a stretch. If you are a DC resident then you pay $7000 a year. If not, it's something like $13,000. They also give alot of scholarships from what I hear.

UDC is in its infant existance and is getting better each year. To be sure, it is a tier-4 school. Just give it a chance.
Title: Re: UDC
Post by: jasonseidman on March 09, 2006, 06:48:15 PM
You are a lost cause.  The information regarding firms recruitment is right on the NALP directory.  Do a search. 

If you want to talk to a UDC student that badly, the smart thing to do would be to call the school and go speak with a few.  Oh wait, I forgot, you aren't smart.

as far as that, if you had read any of the posts, you would realize that i am going down next weekend, but who cares


What is up with this intense hate of UDC? As far as the bar pass rates are concerned, you all need to look behind the statistic to get the full story. The fact of the matter is that most of the people over the past few years who graduated UDC did not have enough money to take any bar-prep courses. Also they are usually older students with families and other jobs who were not able to devote as much time to studying for the bar as younger students from other law schools.

One person said something about going there and being $100,000 in debt after you graduate. That's a stretch. If you are a DC resident then you pay $7000 a year. If not, it's something like $13,000. They also give alot of scholarships from what I hear.

UDC is in its infant existance and is getting better each year. To be sure, it is a tier-4 school. Just give it a chance.

lawlaw - do you go to udc?  where have you gotten such open opinions and views of the school?
Title: Re: UDC
Post by: Erapitt on March 09, 2006, 07:19:43 PM
Agreed about the cheap tuition... However, you still have to consider living expenses in DC.  They are HIGH.  I have lived here for a couple of years now and I couldn't imagine using only loans to pay my debt off.

Also, fulltime students can't use the excuse of no time to study.  The ABA prohibits working as a 1L so being a FT student is your JOB.  People work 40-60 hours a week and raise a family, people can handle being a full time student and doing the same.
Title: Re: UDC
Post by: CDunker on March 09, 2006, 08:00:07 PM
I don't hate UDC.  I just think that it is pointless for the OP to go there. 

As the other poster said, tuition might only be 13K a year, but the cost of living in dc is high.  My rent is 1250/month, and I live in a studio across the river in NoVA.  Add in books, food money, car insurance, parking, health insurance, etc, etc, and you are looking at close to 35K/year to attend the school. That's a lot of money to go to a school that has poor bar passage rates.

Also, it doesn't matter if the people at the school can't afford to take Barbri.  Most people can't.  Almost everyone I know takes loans to pay for the course or has their firm pay for it.  UDC students can borrow the money just like everybody else. 

The OP has been posting on every board asking the same questions and getting the same response.  He apparently wants to return to new jersery when her graduates from law school.  The cold, hard truth is that he has less than a 1% chance of finding a job in New Jersey with a UDC degree. 
Title: Re: UDC
Post by: jasonseidman on March 09, 2006, 08:08:13 PM
I JUST LOVE HOW PEOPLE BASE THEIR STATS OFF OF FACTS!!!  LESS THAN A 1% CHANCE, SO SCIENTIFIC.   THATS IT, I JUST DONT CARE ANYMORE.  I HOPE TO RUN INTO MANY OF YOU IN DC, AND LATER ON IN PRACTICE.
Title: Re: UDC
Post by: Erapitt on March 09, 2006, 08:13:22 PM
Dude, wake up.  Everyone knows that anything out of the Top 20-25 Schools is for the most part regional.  Anything out of the top 100 schools is definately regional, and anything in Tiers 3 and 4 is without a doubt ONLY regional.  UDC is regional and even that is a strech.  Firms here won't hire UDC graduates, it is even less likely that a firm in NJ will.

You won't ever run into us in practice bro.... Many of us will be in Government, Biglaw, or major Public Interest Groups.  You will be lucky to pass the bar and even if you do, you likely won't ever practice as a lawyer if you go to UDC. 
Title: Re: UDC
Post by: mecarr on March 09, 2006, 09:09:37 PM

You won't ever run into us in practice bro.... Many of us will be in Government, Biglaw, or major Public Interest Groups.  You will be lucky to pass the bar and even if you do, you likely won't ever practice as a lawyer if you go to UDC. 

Dude, things like that make you sound more snobby and elitist than you probably are. To make such a statement like someone who graduates from UDC will never practice as a lawyer is ridiculous. Just because you graduate from a top-25 law school does not mean that you will be a super successful lawyer for the rest of your life. And just because you graduate from a tier 4 school does not mean that you won't ever be a practicing lawyer.

As for being lucky to pass the bar...You guys are acting like 15% of people at UDC pass the bar and passing it is just "luck". I checked and the latest figure shows 65% of UDC graduates passing the bar on the first try and it has only been going up every year. So you guys need to step off your pedestal or you eventually be taken down in the courtroom by someone else..
Title: Re: UDC
Post by: CDunker on March 09, 2006, 09:23:53 PM
The OP came here looking to hear good things about the school.  Unfortunately, there isn't very much good to say about it.  LSAC puts the bar passage rate at 35%.  http://officialguide.lsac.org/OFFGUIDE/pdf/aba5245.pdf  I don't see any stats quoting a higher rate.  I never said that it would be impossible for the OP to pass the bar, just that the odds are stacked against him. 

The OP expected us to pat him on the back and say that it's a great school.  It's not.  I'm sure, though, that he'll hear a lot of great things about it when he visits.
Title: Re: UDC
Post by: Erapitt on March 10, 2006, 06:27:41 AM
Exactly....  I am not snobby or elitist in the least bit.  However, after kindly stating the facts about the school and pretty much being snipped at and attacked I get a little fed up.  Don't post looking for information if you are not willing to listen to the facts.

Also, I love when people say how they are going to tear me up in the courtroom lol.  Its so easy to say you are going to do something that will never be proven to happen.  First, I likely won't ever see you in a courtroom, and second, who is to say you won't be horrible and I could be some mastermind in the courts?  Fact is, none of us know at this point.  One thing we DO know is that I will have countless more opportunities to get me in the courtroom, while you will be lucky to get your foot in the door.

Go to a site like myspace.com.  Do a search for cooley law alum.  Many of them are now working as legal ASSISTANTS because they can't get a job practicing law as lawyers.  All that debt for nothing.  Many don't even have jobs.
Title: Re: UDC
Post by: Googlebox on January 19, 2011, 07:10:49 AM
UNIVERSITY OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA DAVID A. CLARKE SCHOOL OF LAW FEATURED IN THE PRINCETON REVIEW'S "THE BEST 172 LAW SCHOOLS: 2011 EDITION"

Washington, D.C., October 12, 2010 – The University of the District of Columbia David A. Clarke School of Law (UDC-DCSL) is one of the nation's most outstanding law schools, according to The Princeton Review. The education services company features the school in the new 2011 edition of its book, "The Best 172 Law Schools” (Random House / Princeton Review, on sale date Oct. 12, 2010, $22.99).

UDC-DCSL is one of 67 schools in the book (39% of the 172) that appear on one or more of the book's top-ten ranking lists. It is 2nd on the list for Most Liberal Students, 4th for Most Diverse Faculty, and 10th for Best Environment for Minority Students. Only six law schools had more top ten rankings than UDC-DCSL, whose three listings tied six other law schools. [Note: not all schools profiled in the book appear on its ranking lists – 67 appear on one or more lists, 105 don't appear on any of its lists.]

Princeton Review does not, however, rank excellence in clinic programs, a major focus of UDC-DCSL’s legal education, and for which it was ranked in the top ten in America by US News and World Report earlier in 2010.

In addition to its top-ten rankings, "The Best 172 Law Schools: 2011 Edition" has two-page profiles of the schools with write-ups on their academics, student life and admissions, plus ratings for their academics, selectivity and career placement services. In the profile on UDC-DCSL the Princeton Review editors describe the school as "a great bargain. The two pillars that set UDC apart are its all-consuming commitment to public interest law and its stellar clinical program." They quote from students attending UDC-DCSL who say "You learn skills that you just cannot learn from casebooks. You will have experiences that many first-level associates can only dream of having.” "The professors want to see you succeed and faculty accessibility couldn’t possibly be any better.” "Friendly and cooperative best describes our law school environment and the relationships among students."

In a "Survey Says . . . " sidebar in the profile, The Princeton Review lists topics that UDC-DCSL students it surveyed were in most agreement about. The list includes: "[Liberal students and students love Washington, D.C.]." The Princeton Review's 80-question survey for the book asked students about themselves, their career plans, and their schools’ academics, student body and campus life.

According to the Princeton Review:

The small David A. Clarke School of Law at the University of the District of Columbia is one of a handful of ABA-accredited law schools at Historically Black Colleges and Universities. By all accounts, UDC is "a great bargain.” It’s "dirt cheap” if you are a resident of Washington, D.C. Even if you aren’t, it’s still remarkably affordable since "the school now has a scholarship program that offers free tuition to 20 activists.” Otherwise, the two pillars that set UDC apart are its "all-consuming” "commitment to public interest law” and its stellar clinical program. This school was founded with the mission to train students from groups underrepresented at the bar and it remains "committed to social justice and advocacy through the law.” Students agree that UDC is "a law school with a conscience” and that they will graduate with "a strong sense of public service and how to serve their communities as lawyers.” The clinical program goes hand in hand with this ethos. Under the supervision of a practicing attorney, all students must complete 700 hours of "hands-on work” assisting low-income clients with substantive, real legal issues before they graduate. "Our clinical experience is like none other,” a 3L boasts. Students gush that they learn skills "that you just cannot learn from casebooks” and they tell us that the clinical requirement provides the expertise necessary "to start practicing law immediately.” "You will have experiences that many first-level associates can only dream of having,” a 2L promises.

Princeton Review continues:

The employment situation for UDC graduates is unique, primarily because it stresses public service so much. The administration and a tremendous number of the students who enroll here want to provide access to the legal system to people who don’t have much money. A very solid percentage of graduates obtain judicial clerkships. Graduates also find jobs at small law firms, with the federal government, and with nonprofit organizations of all sizes. Older UDC alumni have gone on to become judges in a host of states. Ultimately, if you want to start out as a public defender, or work for a federal agency or a public interest organization, UDC is an ideal law school.

Princeton Review does not rank the law schools in the book on a single hierarchical list from 1 to 172, or name one law school best overall. Instead, the book has 11 ranking lists of the top 10 law schools in various categories. Ten lists are based on The Princeton Review's surveys of 18,000 students attending the 172 law schools profiled in the book. (Only schools that permitted The Princeton Review to survey their students were eligible for consideration for these lists.) Conducted during the 2009-10, 2008-09, and 2007-08 academic years, the student surveys were primarily completed online. One list, "Toughest to Get Into,” is based solely on institutional data. (All schools in the book were eligible for consideration for this list.) The lists are posted at www.PrincetonReview.com.

According to Robert Franek, Princeton Review Senior VP-Publishing,

"We are pleased to recommend UDC-DCSL to readers of our book and users of our website as one of the best institutions they could attend to earn a law school degree. We chose the 172 schools for this book based on our high opinion of their academic programs and offerings, as well as our review of institutional data we collect from the schools. We also strongly consider the candid opinions of students attending the schools who rate and report on their campus experiences at their schools on our student survey for the book."

Title: Re: UDC
Post by: Googlebox on January 19, 2011, 07:11:58 AM
UNIVERSITY OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA DAVID A. CLARKE SCHOOL OF LAW FEATURED IN THE PRINCETON REVIEW'S "THE BEST 172 LAW SCHOOLS: 2011 EDITION"

Washington, D.C., October 12, 2010 – The University of the District of Columbia David A. Clarke School of Law (UDC-DCSL) is one of the nation's most outstanding law schools, according to The Princeton Review. The education services company features the school in the new 2011 edition of its book, "The Best 172 Law Schools” (Random House / Princeton Review, on sale date Oct. 12, 2010, $22.99).

UDC-DCSL is one of 67 schools in the book (39% of the 172) that appear on one or more of the book's top-ten ranking lists. It is 2nd on the list for Most Liberal Students, 4th for Most Diverse Faculty, and 10th for Best Environment for Minority Students. Only six law schools had more top ten rankings than UDC-DCSL, whose three listings tied six other law schools. [Note: not all schools profiled in the book appear on its ranking lists – 67 appear on one or more lists, 105 don't appear on any of its lists.]

Princeton Review does not, however, rank excellence in clinic programs, a major focus of UDC-DCSL’s legal education, and for which it was ranked in the top ten in America by US News and World Report earlier in 2010.

In addition to its top-ten rankings, "The Best 172 Law Schools: 2011 Edition" has two-page profiles of the schools with write-ups on their academics, student life and admissions, plus ratings for their academics, selectivity and career placement services. In the profile on UDC-DCSL the Princeton Review editors describe the school as "a great bargain. The two pillars that set UDC apart are its all-consuming commitment to public interest law and its stellar clinical program." They quote from students attending UDC-DCSL who say "You learn skills that you just cannot learn from casebooks. You will have experiences that many first-level associates can only dream of having.” "The professors want to see you succeed and faculty accessibility couldn’t possibly be any better.” "Friendly and cooperative best describes our law school environment and the relationships among students."

In a "Survey Says . . . " sidebar in the profile, The Princeton Review lists topics that UDC-DCSL students it surveyed were in most agreement about. The list includes: "[Liberal students and students love Washington, D.C.]." The Princeton Review's 80-question survey for the book asked students about themselves, their career plans, and their schools’ academics, student body and campus life.

According to the Princeton Review:

The small David A. Clarke School of Law at the University of the District of Columbia is one of a handful of ABA-accredited law schools at Historically Black Colleges and Universities. By all accounts, UDC is "a great bargain.” It’s "dirt cheap” if you are a resident of Washington, D.C. Even if you aren’t, it’s still remarkably affordable since "the school now has a scholarship program that offers free tuition to 20 activists.” Otherwise, the two pillars that set UDC apart are its "all-consuming” "commitment to public interest law” and its stellar clinical program. This school was founded with the mission to train students from groups underrepresented at the bar and it remains "committed to social justice and advocacy through the law.” Students agree that UDC is "a law school with a conscience” and that they will graduate with "a strong sense of public service and how to serve their communities as lawyers.” The clinical program goes hand in hand with this ethos. Under the supervision of a practicing attorney, all students must complete 700 hours of "hands-on work” assisting low-income clients with substantive, real legal issues before they graduate. "Our clinical experience is like none other,” a 3L boasts. Students gush that they learn skills "that you just cannot learn from casebooks” and they tell us that the clinical requirement provides the expertise necessary "to start practicing law immediately.” "You will have experiences that many first-level associates can only dream of having,” a 2L promises.

Princeton Review continues:

The employment situation for UDC graduates is unique, primarily because it stresses public service so much. The administration and a tremendous number of the students who enroll here want to provide access to the legal system to people who don’t have much money. A very solid percentage of graduates obtain judicial clerkships. Graduates also find jobs at small law firms, with the federal government, and with nonprofit organizations of all sizes. Older UDC alumni have gone on to become judges in a host of states. Ultimately, if you want to start out as a public defender, or work for a federal agency or a public interest organization, UDC is an ideal law school.

Princeton Review does not rank the law schools in the book on a single hierarchical list from 1 to 172, or name one law school best overall. Instead, the book has 11 ranking lists of the top 10 law schools in various categories. Ten lists are based on The Princeton Review's surveys of 18,000 students attending the 172 law schools profiled in the book. (Only schools that permitted The Princeton Review to survey their students were eligible for consideration for these lists.) Conducted during the 2009-10, 2008-09, and 2007-08 academic years, the student surveys were primarily completed online. One list, "Toughest to Get Into,” is based solely on institutional data. (All schools in the book were eligible for consideration for this list.) The lists are posted at www.PrincetonReview.com.

According to Robert Franek, Princeton Review Senior VP-Publishing,

"We are pleased to recommend UDC-DCSL to readers of our book and users of our website as one of the best institutions they could attend to earn a law school degree. We chose the 172 schools for this book based on our high opinion of their academic programs and offerings, as well as our review of institutional data we collect from the schools. We also strongly consider the candid opinions of students attending the schools who rate and report on their campus experiences at their schools on our student survey for the book."

Title: Re: UDC
Post by: haus on January 19, 2011, 08:10:21 AM
Googlebox,

Did you copy everything related to UDC from the book into your posting?

I am glad to see that UDC seems to have improved the bar passage rate of its students, and has remained a very reasonable price (by law school standards, most of which cost mor money then they should).

The next few years will be interesting for UDC. I hope that budget concerns to not cause large jumps in tuition that have plagued many schools.
Title: Re: UDC
Post by: Kaiser7935 on March 02, 2011, 08:08:30 AM
Recently, a solid 92 percent of UDC students passed the Maryland bar exam, about 7 percentage points higher than the state average. Students also bested the DC bar by 9.5 percentage points, though only 11 of them sat for it.  The facts are the facts! UDC is a rising school. You will be graduating with a cool 30k in loans while a GW grad has 120k. I know an Assistant State's Attorney who graduated from UDC Law and supervises a lot of GW grads. The only different is he is not sweating every night trying to figure out how to pay his bills. UDC is a school that teaches you how to be attorney in the courtroom. If you want corporate stuff go elsewhere. If you want to eventually start your own firm and learn real world legal skills go to UDC.
Title: Re: UDC
Post by: haus on March 02, 2011, 01:39:08 PM
Recently, a solid 92 percent of UDC students passed the Maryland bar exam, about 7 percentage points higher than the state average. Students also bested the DC bar by 9.5 percentage points, though only 11 of them sat for it.  The facts are the facts! UDC is a rising school. You will be graduating with a cool 30k in loans while a GW grad has 120k. I know an Assistant State's Attorney who graduated from UDC Law and supervises a lot of GW grads. The only different is he is not sweating every night trying to figure out how to pay his bills. UDC is a school that teaches you how to be attorney in the courtroom. If you want corporate stuff go elsewhere. If you want to eventually start your own firm and learn real world legal skills go to UDC.

Kaiser,

To be fair to get out under 30k one needs to be a DC resident, which not many people are. Although the "Out of City" tuition of just under $18k/year is less than the in-state tuition at George Mason (which is a little over $22k/year last I checked).

As I said before there are indeed things that are looking up for UDC, it is one of the lowest cost options that I am aware of (especially in the region). I do still have worries about what the city budget is going to do to UDC, it would be a shame if funds were slashed or tuition were to be jacked up considerably to offset other finical problems that the city has.