Law School Discussion

Law Students => Current Law Students => Topic started by: tjohnl on November 23, 2005, 03:56:43 PM

Title: Adderall-Law school finals/studying
Post by: tjohnl on November 23, 2005, 03:56:43 PM
Fellow 1Ls,2Ls and 3Ls:

 Would like your input on this subject.  Used the powerful blue uppers of AD in undergrad and currently considering using them for my three hour exams in law school.  I do not take these pills frequently but find when I take them while reviewing material, AD is extremely helpful and productive.  On the other hand, I got into law school because of my LSAT score and on that test under the consumption of adderall I scored signifiantly lower.  Therefore, for the ultimate LSAT test, I determined taking the blue pill was couunter productive and I did not consume AD on test day.  Ultimately I scored well enough to get into a T50 school (hence the previous sentence of LSAT=law  school acceptance).  I need help in determining if that should be the same rule (haha, I f-ing hate legal writing 1) for Fall 1L exams or if I should take the dirty amphetamine salt that makes me feel cracked out because it would keep me alert and focused upon fact patterns and black letter law during the final?  Please give input.  Don't judge.  I'm being honest and actually upfront about something a lot of people consume at many law schools. Thank you for your advice.

T john1

P.S. I'm not diagnosed with ADD or ADHD but I have a great deal focusing and my mind runs in multiple directions.  I do feel that IF I went to a doctor he/she would diagnose me with ADD or ADHD.  I'm reluctant because I know what the effects of Adderall are on me and DO NOT want to feel those everyday.  Complicates things..doesn't it? Just like a confusing hypo.

   
Title: Re: Adderall-Law school finals/studying
Post by: Jumboshrimps on November 23, 2005, 05:33:20 PM
I do commend you on being upfront about your intentions.

My friend, you seem to have a wonderful ambition for the trees, but you've lost sight of the forest. Do you want to be the lawyer and the person you actually are, or do you want your achievments and progress to always be subject to the caveat that you took the proper pill on the appropriate occasion?

You should embrace the way your brain works. Allow yourself to consider that this may be an asset in many ways. Then ask yourself if you really want to short circuit that asset by forcing your mind to conform to what YOU THINK it should be doing.

Bottom line- you should let your mind do its thing so that it can grow to being the best mind of its type, rather that tell your mind which mold it should fit into, even at the price of a little temporary clarity.

It's scary to be lost. Maybe even a little exciting...
Title: Re: Adderall-Law school finals/studying
Post by: usedcarmanager on December 11, 2005, 05:54:25 PM
On the other (pre-law) board people say Adderall is great for studying and essay exams -- on multiple-choice exams it does not help because you tend to overanalyze.
Title: Re: Adderall-Law school finals/studying
Post by: vault on August 07, 2006, 10:40:23 PM
Adderall is not as potent as Cocaine. In fact, their mechanisms of action differ.

Amphetamines

Amphetamines are drugs used to combat fatigue. Like cocaine, amphetamines increase the concentration of dopamine in the synaptic gap, but by a different mechanism. Amphetamines are similar in structure to dopamine, and so can enter the terminal button of the presynaptic neuron via its dopamine transporters as well as by diffusing through the neural membrane directly. As the animation to the right shows, once inside the presynaptic neuron, amphetamines force the dopamine molecules out of their storage vesicles and expel them into the synaptic gap by making the dopamine transporters work in reverse.

Amphetamines also seem to act by several other mechanisms. For example, they seem to reduce the reuptake of dopamine and, in high concentrations, to inhibit monoamine oxydase A (MAO-A).

Amphetamines may also excite dopaminergic neurons via glutamate neurons. Amphetamines would thus remove an inhibiting effect due to metabotropic glutamate receptors. By thus releasing this natural brake, amphetamines would make the dopaminergic neurons more readily excitable.

http://www.thebrain.mcgill.ca/flash/i/i_03/i_03_m/i_03_m_par/i_03_m_par_amphetamine.html#drogues

Cocaine

Cocaine acts by blocking the reuptake of certain neurotransmitters such as dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin. By binding to the transporters that normally remove the excess of these neurotransmitters from the synaptic gap, cocaine prevents them from being reabsorbed by the neurons that released them and thus increases their concentration in the synapses (see animation). As a result, the natural effect of dopamine on the post-synaptic neurons is amplified. The group of neurons thus modified produces the euphoria (from dopamine), feelings of confidence (from serotonin), and energy (from norepinephrine) typically experienced by people who take cocaine.

In addition, because the norepinephrine neurons in the locus coeruleus project their axons into all the main structures of the forebrain, the powerful overall effect of cocaine can be readily understood.

In chronic cocaine consumers, the brain comes to rely on this exogenous drug to maintain the high degree of pleasure associated with the artificially elevated dopamine levels in its reward circuits. The postsynaptic membrane can even adapt so much to these high dopamine levels that it actually manufactures new receptors. The resulting increased sensitivity produces depression and cravings if cocaine consumption ceases and dopamine levels return to normal.

Dependency on cocaine is thus closely related to its effect on the neurons of the reward circuit.

http://www.thebrain.mcgill.ca/flash/i/i_03/i_03_m/i_03_m_par/i_03_m_par_cocaine.html#drogues
Title: Re: Adderall-Law school finals/studying
Post by: lovee on August 08, 2006, 04:05:16 AM
Great website, vault! Thanx for the post!
Title: Re: Adderall-Law school finals/studying
Post by: DeltaTauKyle on August 08, 2006, 05:17:26 AM
Dude, who gives a *&^%.  If the pills help you, take them.  I know a ton of people who do coke and study, so I am hardly going to condemn anyone for doing AD.  And before anyone jumps my *&^% for supporting this, I study high on life + coffee.
Title: Re: Adderall-Law school finals/studying
Post by: dmitrik4 on August 08, 2006, 08:33:18 AM

My friend, you seem to have a wonderful ambition for the trees, but you've lost sight of the forest. Do you want to be the lawyer and the person you actually are, or do you want your achievments and progress to always be subject to the caveat that you took the proper pill on the appropriate occasion?


+1.  are you planning to keep popping those pills throughout your career?  if not, why start now?  just learn the material.  instead of looking for shortcuts, understand how your mind works and adapt your study habits to that.

i have the same problem as you; my mind constantly wanders.  its not exactly an uncommon trait.  it takes discipline and a recognition that absolute concentration for hours on end isn't your way.  so take frequent breaks if you need them to keep your mind fresh.  i often found that my wandering mind ended up giving me a perspective on an issue or showing me a connection between two seemingly separate issues i might not otherwise have appreciated.

plus, there is no prize for "most time spent in the library."

i know some people who popped pills while studying and none of them did THAT well in the end, so i don't know what benefit they really offer someone who doesn't legitimately need them.
Title: Re: Adderall-Law school finals/studying
Post by: rapunzel on August 08, 2006, 11:23:20 AM
If you think that you might legitimately hvae ADHD then see a doctor.  There is a book called Driven to Distraction that is an excellent resource.  If you recieve a diagnosis you may be perscribed medication and/or therapy. 

If not, then stand up and do this on your own merits.  The results of taking the drugs could be unpredictable at best, and you will underminine your own sense of achievement. 
Title: Re: Adderall-Law school finals/studying
Post by: LostMyMonkeys on August 08, 2006, 06:52:55 PM
So you are admitting on a public, google-able message board that you use illegal perscription drugs?
What a lawyer you are gonna make

Seriously, I have no respect for your 'being all out in the open about it'. @#!* that. You, and everyone else who pops *&^% like that to try to get an edge, are morons.

Your mind wanders? Welcome to the f-ing real world. We all do it. We overcome it. Its called discipline and practice and focus. You learn to do it.
Get over yourself
Title: Re: Adderall-Law school finals/studying
Post by: shire on August 09, 2006, 02:20:55 AM
Pink pills are 20 mg., blue pills 10. 20 mg. is enough to keep you sharp and awake for about 8-10 hours. On the street, Adderall used to be sold illegally for $1-$5 a pill (for a 20-30mg capsule). Now, street price has gone up, $ 4-10 for 20 mg. Slang names are: "ralls", "bennies", "amps", "addies", "jollies", and in some regions of the U.S., "railguns". The 5mg and 10mg doses are also known in the northwest as "BBs", which is short for "Blueberries", named for their blue color. Heavier users tend to use the term "GBs", short for "goofballs", referring to the "goofed up" feeling from taking in excess of 100mg in a night.

(http://www.ennislaw.com/images/adderall.jpg)

You can read quickly, work intensely, think rapidly. Your heart beats fast and your legs tingle. You run steps. You get ideas and dive into them passionately, productively and powerfully. Eating and sleeping become unnecessary. Your mind is acute, your body charged. You're awake and working until you fall asleep, satisfied and relieved. It makes you feel like Superman, giving you the power and self-control you always wished you had. Unlike speed or cocaine, however, you can still function normally.

The real worry is dependence, though. Some ppl say that after they've been using Adderall really frequently, they cannot concentrate without it. It is not something to use every day. I've heard of ppl doing 80 mg. before going out to clubs. Or using it every night. Or even multiple times a day. A typical, careful student takes Adderall about once every 10 days to pull all-nighters.
Title: Re: Adderall-Law school finals/studying
Post by: Jumboshrimps on August 09, 2006, 09:52:44 AM
Chemically altering one's brain chemistry in order to get away from work has long been regarded as a socially-acceptable vice, if done in moderation. If any of you think for one second that altering brain chemistry in order to actually work is a sustainable, acceptable, or healthy practice, you are in for an emotional and professional mess. You'll probably get by, but your own personal demons will torture you until you learn to live with your real self. That could be decades from now.
Title: Re: Adderall-Law school finals/studying
Post by: r e g g i e on August 11, 2006, 09:44:31 AM
I can agree with that assessment .. They say crack-cocaine delivers an intensity of pleasure beyond the bounds of normal human experience. Unfortunately, it delivers suffering beyond the bounds of normal human experience too. The pleasure it yields is brief. The suffering that follows may be prolonged. The brain's hedonic treadmill isn't easily cheated.

The high from crack cocaine is intensely rewarding. But the experience is short-lived. Crack's euphoric effect is so extraordinarily hard to forget. If one succumbs to curiosity, and finds out what one is missing, then the rest of one's life may pall in comparison. For there is nothing in life that's naturally so enjoyable as crack. However, the user's family and loved ones may suffer the price of pleasure almost as severely as the addict.
Title: Re: Adderall-Law school finals/studying
Post by: PSUDSL08 on August 11, 2006, 11:17:15 AM
Dude, who gives a *&^%.  If the pills help you, take them.  I know a ton of people who do coke and study, so I am hardly going to condemn anyone for doing AD.  And before anyone jumps my *&^% for supporting this, I study high on life + coffee.

Damn, what school are you attending? I believe you, I just never experienced this at my school. If anything, people I knew were taking nyquil or xanax to get to bed, not to stay awake. I took addies for a semester in college and I went from a 3.2 to a 3.6 my final college semester when I stopped using addies despite having a more difficult courseload. Guess I'm the minority.

I was pretty liberal during my party days in college, so if you want to use addies to get by in law school, go for it. However, with a good diet, exercise, vitamins, and some coffee you can get by without getting hooked to substances other than caffeine. Somewhere down the line, you're going to have to stop using these pills to succeed. I don't think too many firms want cracked out, sweaty, nervous associates who grind their teeth all day long.
Title: Re: Adderall-Law school finals/studying
Post by: racheles05 on August 11, 2006, 03:14:13 PM
I don't know anybody who did well at my school and did AD. That could mean that there are people who did well, took the pills and I don't know about it. If you really think you have ADHD then you should get it diagnosed. A doctor can prescribe the correct amount of medication so that you're not haphazardly popping pills when you think you need it, and their effects will be managed.
Title: Re: Adderall-Law school finals/studying
Post by: dft on August 11, 2006, 03:55:10 PM
Unlike speed or cocaine, however, you can still function normally.

Adderall is "speed." Hope that helps.

P.S. When I used used to take Adderall and Ritalin per prescription, it completely killed my sex drive, which sucked.
Title: Re: Adderall-Law school finals/studying
Post by: Strong on August 11, 2006, 08:46:32 PM
I like the analogy that you won't be going to the local college to buy adderal once you are an attorney, and use of any stimulants will be frowned upon, so why start now.

Many people manage to do just fine without using illegal drugs.

If it gives you the effects people describe, then you don't need  prescription, thats the whole point
Title: Re: Adderall-Law school finals/studying
Post by: callingthedevil on August 13, 2006, 06:09:33 PM

P.S. When I used used to take Adderall and Ritalin per prescription, it completely killed my sex drive, which sucked.


This can't be anything else but sarcasm! I mean, they say you have a hell of a libido when on amphetamines!
Title: Re: Adderall-Law school finals/studying
Post by: dft on August 13, 2006, 08:46:17 PM
This can't be anything else but sarcasm! I mean, they say you have a hell of a libido when on amphetamines!

"6 Female Libido Killers... Amphetamines (speed, crystal meth). Amphetamines are known to cause sexual dysfunction in both men and women. While speeding, sex is likely to be far from her (and your) mind, but talking a lot will not be."

http://www.askmen.com/love/vanessa_100/129d_love_secrets.html

"Adderall (mixed amphetamines) is used to treat a sleeping disorder called narcolepsy as well as attention-deficit disorder (ADD). Initially, amphetamine may increase sex drive, but over time, interest in sex may diminish. Impotence is also a potential side effect. Animal studies suggest that amphetamine can suppress testosterone production and may account for these complications."

http://www.latimes.com/features/health/la-he-pharmacy11jul11,1,2213523.column?coll=la-headlines-health

"Possible Side Effects of Adderall®
Side effects include... impotence or changes in sex drive."

http://www.nyu.edu/nyuhc/studydrugs/

"Side Effects: ... Changes in sex drive or inability to maintain an erection"

http://www.mcmaster.ca/health/hwc/Newsletters/mar04/quick_fix_ritalin.htm

"Adverse Reactions... Impotence and changes in libido."

http://www.whatmeds.com/meds/adderall.html
Title: Re: Adderall-Law school finals/studying
Post by: betty on August 13, 2006, 10:18:05 PM
If you use them occassionally you'll see your sexual appetite increases considerably. However if you take them every day you'll end up with a weenie.
Title: Re: Adderall-Law school finals/studying
Post by: dft on August 14, 2006, 06:11:40 AM
If you use them occassionally you'll see your sexual appetite increases considerably. However if you take them every day you'll end up with a weenie.

I think the effects depend on the person. But I think, at least in general, what you have said is true.
Title: Re: Adderall-Law school finals/studying
Post by: 4DClaw on August 14, 2006, 06:28:40 AM
In undergrad I took gingko biloba before each final. It's always helped me concentrate and stay energized throughout a long and boring exam. It may be a placebo effect, but it works for me.
Title: Re: Adderall-Law school finals/studying
Post by: onefreeneutron on August 16, 2006, 04:58:40 PM

I can agree with that assessment .. They say crack-cocaine delivers an intensity of pleasure beyond the bounds of normal human experience. Unfortunately, it delivers suffering beyond the bounds of normal human experience too. The pleasure it yields is brief. The suffering that follows may be prolonged. The brain's hedonic treadmill isn't easily cheated.

The high from crack cocaine is intensely rewarding. But the experience is short-lived. Crack's euphoric effect is so extraordinarily hard to forget. If one succumbs to curiosity, and finds out what one is missing, then the rest of one's life may pall in comparison. For there is nothing in life that's naturally so enjoyable as crack. However, the user's family and loved ones may suffer the price of pleasure almost as severely as the addict.


Indeed, crack cocaine's high is so intense that it has been described as being greater than a thousand orgasms all at once ... 
Title: Re: Adderall-Law school finals/studying
Post by: horsdoeuvre on August 16, 2006, 05:34:53 PM

On the other (pre-law) board people say Adderall is great for studying and essay exams -- on multiple-choice exams it does not help because you tend to overanalyze.


There's definitely the potential of overfocusing, which isn't good for the LSAT and multiple-choice type of exams. The latter require minute analysis of the trees (OK, hyperfocus good), but also seeing the forest ... In other words, you concentrate too much on each answer (Is choice A right? Is choice B right? Is choice C right? etc.) instead of (Ok, choice B, D, E can't be right, it has to be either A or C!)

When on Adderall you tend to "think deep." But standardized tests penalize students that tend to favor deeper approaches to problem solving. Students who score highest on such tests tend to use more superficial thinking strategies than those who score in the low and moderate ranges. The lowest-ranking students employ the deep approach more often than the higher scoring ones. Standardized tests fail to measure the qualities that are truly important, reward the ability to adopt a superficial style of thinking, and in fact penalize many of the candidates with the deepest minds.

Occasionally, individual questions are defective, with the wanted answer or all of the answers being incorrect. More frequently, questions are ambiguous so that more than one answer may be defended as plausibly being "the best", and only those candidates with deep minds are likely to notice the ambiguity and be troubled by it. However, even if all the questions were impeccable, the deep student would see more in a question than his more superficial competitors would ever dream was in it, and would expend more time and mental energy than them in answering it. But the multiple-choice tests are concerned solely with the candidates choice of answer, and not with the reasons for his choise. They ignore that elusive yet crucial thing called quality.
Title: Re: Adderall-Law school finals/studying
Post by: visaelectron on August 16, 2006, 05:44:03 PM

I can agree with that assessment .. They say crack-cocaine delivers an intensity of pleasure beyond the bounds of normal human experience. Unfortunately, it delivers suffering beyond the bounds of normal human experience too. The pleasure it yields is brief. The suffering that follows may be prolonged. The brain's hedonic treadmill isn't easily cheated.

The high from crack cocaine is intensely rewarding. But the experience is short-lived. Crack's euphoric effect is so extraordinarily hard to forget. If one succumbs to curiosity, and finds out what one is missing, then the rest of one's life may pall in comparison. For there is nothing in life that's naturally so enjoyable as crack. However, the user's family and loved ones may suffer the price of pleasure almost as severely as the addict.


Exactly! Cocaine is extremely habit-forming. It is potentially dangerous when indulged in to excess. If rats or monkeys are hooked up to an intravenous source of heroin, they will happily self-administer the drug indefinitely; but they still find time to sleep and eat.

If rats or monkeys can freely self-administer cocaine, however, they will do virtually nothing else. Captive animals continue to press their drug-delivery lever for as long as they are physically capable of doing so. Their fate is similar to an intracranially self-stimulating laboratory rodent. Within weeks, if not days, they will lose a substantial portion of their body weight - up to 40%. Within a month, they will be dead.
Title: Re: Adderall-Law school finals/studying
Post by: miranda on August 16, 2006, 05:54:15 PM
Keep taking Adderall if it helps you and finds no diagreement with your mental balance. For palpable results you'd have to take it continuously over a period of time.

For tests as important as the LSAT and law school exams, it's far from cheating. In fact, you'd be cheating yourself not to. It's

a) not chemically or physically addictive

b) far more advanced than ritalin, speed, common cocaine, meth (I bet you didn't know that JP Sartre used to take an advanced form of dexedrine, Adderall's first cousin, to increase his cognitive agility when writing)

c)has no correlation towards anything life threatening or mind-altering ... you're not going to end up emptying catheter bags as a parolee, or see a plummetting trend in your life because of little adderall to channel sights. 

You know why SPEED wreaks havoc? Because it's made on the street and improperly. A real chemist in decent conditions makes it, it's going to have the legitimate effects minus the sideffects of the filler. Even the most contrian psychiatrist is going to tell you  that 25 mgs of Adderall is nothing like cocaine or methamphetamines. 

Don't let puritanical impositions dissuade you if you think the stuff increases your composure and confidence. You're using it to help you take tests, not to get a better high or a bigger ego. And if you start associating a drug with studious activity and exam prepartion, dear god, you are going to end up hopelessly addicted ... to high achievement. Who checked that box on their inpatient survey at the methadone clinic?
Title: Re: Adderall-Law school finals/studying
Post by: dmitrik4 on August 16, 2006, 08:10:21 PM
that's all well and good, but what happens when actual focus and mental work is required and there are no pills available..."sorry boss, i gotta wait until next week to work on that memo; need to stock up again if i'm going to be able to concentrate"?

not to mention that obtaining prescription drugs w/out a prescription was still illegal last time i heard.  wonderful start to a long and ethical career.  but i guess if you don't think you have the mental chops to succeed without it, go for it; i haven't seen any evidence that it really helps at all.
Title: Re: Adderall-Law school finals/studying
Post by: studentloan on August 17, 2006, 03:27:59 AM

The high from crack cocaine is intensely rewarding. But the experience is short-lived. Crack's euphoric effect is so extraordinarily hard to forget. If one succumbs to curiosity, and finds out what one is missing, then the rest of one's life may pall in comparison. For there is nothing in life that's naturally so enjoyable as crack. However, the user's family and loved ones may suffer the price of pleasure almost as severely as the addict.


Don't tell the kids, but there's a dirty little secret about crack: as with most other drugs, a lot of people use it without getting addicted. In their zeal to shield young people from the plague of drugs, the media and many drug educators have hyped the very real dangers of crack into a myth of instant and total addiction ... That doesn't mean it's safe to play with crack, or with most other drugs, legal or illegal. Addiction is a slippery slope. But what worries a growing number of drug experts is that the cry of wolf about instant addiction may backfire.
Title: Re: Adderall-Law school finals/studying
Post by: french kiss on August 18, 2006, 04:50:32 AM

Keep taking Adderall if it helps you and finds no diagreement with your mental balance. For palpable results you'd have to take it continuously over a period of time.

For tests as important as the LSAT and law school exams, it's far from cheating. In fact, you'd be cheating yourself not to. It's

a) not chemically or physically addictive

b) far more advanced than ritalin, speed, common cocaine, meth (I bet you didn't know that JP Sartre used to take an advanced form of dexedrine, Adderall's first cousin, to increase his cognitive agility when writing)

c)has no correlation towards anything life threatening or mind-altering ... you're not going to end up emptying catheter bags as a parolee, or see a plummetting trend in your life because of little adderall to channel sights. 

You know why SPEED wreaks havoc? Because it's made on the street and improperly. A real chemist in decent conditions makes it, it's going to have the legitimate effects minus the sideffects of the filler. Even the most contrian psychiatrist is going to tell you  that 25 mgs of Adderall is nothing like cocaine or methamphetamines. 

Don't let puritanical impositions dissuade you if you think the stuff increases your composure and confidence. You're using it to help you take tests, not to get a better high or a bigger ego. And if you start associating a drug with studious activity and exam prepartion, dear god, you are going to end up hopelessly addicted ... to high achievement. Who checked that box on their inpatient survey at the methadone clinic?


Adderall suppresses all spontaneous behavior. In healthy chimpanzees and other animals, this can be measured with precision as a reduction in all spontaneous or self-generated activities. In animals and in humans, this is manifested in a reduction in,

(1) exploration and curiosity;
(2) socializing, and
(3) playing.

Adderall increases obsessive-compulsive behaviors, including very limited, overly focused activities.

Animals and humans cross addict to methylphenidate, amphetamine and cocaine. These drugs affect the same three neurotransmitter systems and the same parts of the brain.
Title: Re: Adderall-Law school finals/studying
Post by: professional demeanor on August 18, 2006, 10:10:03 PM
Anecdotal evidence suggests that you may not know clarity of mind and emotional stability until you've had your first dose of Adderall! It's like every light in the stadium has come on. And it also includes tuning into a radio and paying attention to it!

However, Adderall will make you think! You will get a ton of stuff done. You will read and read and read! BUT, you ability to interact socially is essentially gone. GONE!!! Sentances or thoughts that flew out of your mouth before will be like trying to put a sentance together with two hands and a flashlight! Also there is an emotional downside if taken too many days in a row. It, like all stimulants, builds up a tolerance in the body.

Adderall can be your best friend and your worst enemy. If you do not take breaks from Adderall, you'll build tolerance.
Title: Re: Adderall-Law school finals/studying
Post by: MONIKA9 on August 21, 2006, 02:52:42 AM

Adderall suppresses all spontaneous behavior. In healthy chimpanzees and other animals, this can be measured with precision as a reduction in all spontaneous or self-generated activities. In animals and in humans, this is manifested in a reduction in,

(1) exploration and curiosity;
(2) socializing, and
(3) playing.



BUT, you ability to interact socially is essentially gone. GONE!!! Sentances or thoughts that flew out of your mouth before will be like trying to put a sentance together with two hands and a flashlight!


Adderall stifling creativity?! Hello?! "Amphetamines gave me a quickness of thought and writing that was at least three times my normal rhythm," Sartre, once remarked. When people write on the drug, it is like they have a choir of angels sitting on their shoulders. Lots of talented people like Auden and Kerouac have taken amphetamines precisely because they find them inspiring. Kerouac and the Beats ingested the drug in such heroic quantities that it didn't just make them more focused, it completely transformed their writing. According to legend, "On the Road" was drafted in a 120-foot-long single-spaced paragraph that burbled down a single continuous scroll of paper.

Unlike steroids Adderall has no long-term health consequences. Provided that is not snorted, injected, or taken in excessive amounts, it's not addictive.
Title: Re: Adderall-Law school finals/studying
Post by: d s l on August 22, 2006, 03:36:34 AM

Provided that is not snorted, injected, or taken in excessive amounts, it's not addictive.


This explains it all I guess ..
Title: Re: Adderall-Law school finals/studying
Post by: aqualung on August 23, 2006, 05:25:50 AM
http://today.reuters.co.uk/news/articlenews.aspx?type=healthNews&storyID=2006-08-21T182850Z_01_WBT005827_RTRIDST_0_HEALTH-ANTIDEPRESSANTS-DC.XML (http://today.reuters.co.uk/news/articlenews.aspx?type=healthNews&storyID=2006-08-21T182850Z_01_WBT005827_RTRIDST_0_HEALTH-ANTIDEPRESSANTS-DC.XML)
Amphetamines may not be good for the heart. They are such big sellers in pharma that the news is being released slowly.
Title: Re: Adderall-Law school finals/studying
Post by: mailbonding on August 23, 2006, 11:31:59 PM

Provided that is not snorted, injected, or taken in excessive amounts, it's not addictive.


This explains it all I guess ..


I don't think there are two many law students that actually ingest Adderall ..
Title: Re: Adderall-Law school finals/studying
Post by: prime on August 25, 2006, 12:36:45 AM

Don't tell the kids, but there's a dirty little secret about crack: as with most other drugs, a lot of people use it without getting addicted. In their zeal to shield young people from the plague of drugs, the media and many drug educators have hyped the very real dangers of crack into a myth of instant and total addiction ... That doesn't mean it's safe to play with crack, or with most other drugs, legal or illegal. Addiction is a slippery slope. But what worries a growing number of drug experts is that the cry of wolf about instant addiction may backfire.


That's what crack cocaine did to Whitney Houston

(http://thetrack.bostonherald.com/images/more_track/whitea01102006.jpg)
Whitney Houston on drugs looks like a bag lady -- photographed at an Atlanta gas station at 4 a.m. one morning last month, looking disheveled and bizarre in pajama bottoms and a $50,000 fur coat.

Whitney Houston's sister-in-law, Tina Brown, has alleged that Houston is addicted to crack cocaine and is living in squalor. Brown claims that she knows this because she has used crack cocaine with Whitney. The British tabloid The Sun has reportedly received photographs of Whitney Houston, depicting drug paraphernalia including a crack pipe, rolling papers and cocaine-covered spoons in the singer's bathroom.

Tina Brown, sister to Whitney Houston's husband Bobby Brown, was quoted by The Sun as saying "The truth needs to come out. Whitney won't stay off the drugs. It's every single day. It's so ugly. Everyone is so scared she is going to overdose."

(http://static.sky.com/images/pictures/1393324.jpg)

The addiction is reported to have become so bad, Houston will hallucinate. Sky Showbiz reports that "Tina claims drugs have made Whitney so paranoid that she sees demons everywhere and once made a hole in the bathroom wall as a spy hole." Elaboration came from a quote on The Sun from Tina, which says "She'll point to the floor and say, 'See that demon. I'm telling you somebody's messing with Bobby'. She always thinks it's something to do with Bobby. But it's her, hitting herself." The reports also claim that Whitney Houston is completely ignoring her own personal hygiene, is using copious amounts of crack cocaine at a time, and is using sex toys to pleasure herself. Houston is reported to have used an entire 8-ball (1/8 of an ounce) of crack at once, by emptying out a cigar, and filling it with the crack rock and marijuana. Habitual users will regularly break an 8-ball into several smaller pieces, using smaller doses at a time.

Reports also claim that Whitney Houston's mother, Cissy, had forced her to go to rehab clinics in March of 2004. It's reported that Whitney used crack in the car en route to the rehab session. Once at the clinic, she would do her best to dodge drug tests. The New York Daily News says she would tell workers at the clinic, "I'm not giving you no pee today. I don't have none right now." The New York Daily News also reports " Whitney allegedly loses her $6,000 set of false teeth when she's high and once appeared toothless, scaring the kids at her niece's school.". As well, " In 2004, a drug dealer called Bobby Brown and ordered him to remove the paranoid and out-of-control Whitney from his crack house. "Come get your wife. I'm sick of this b----," the dealer reportedly complained"

Other instances of how her addiction is ruining her life include The Sun's report of how "Whitney was also rushed to hospital in 2003 with blood gushing from her nose - and emerged with a bizarre bandage on it. A source said: 'Everyone wondered what happened to Whitney's nose.'" All of this is a drastic departure from the Whitney Houston the world has seen in the past. Houston started singing as a soloist in the junior gospel choir of the New Hope Baptist Church in Newark, New Jersey. She cut her first record deal with Arista in 1983. Her first album was released February 14th, 1985 and was self-titled. Songs like "You Give Good Love" and "Greatest Love of All" gave the album the strength to sell 24 million copies worldwide. Her follow-up album, entitled Whitney, launched on June 29th, 1987. #1 hits like "I Want to Dance With Somebody (Who Loves Me)", "Didn't We Almost Have it All" and "Where Do Broken Hearts Go?" help the album to sell 19 million copies. I'm Your Baby Tonight, her 1990 album, did fewer sales, only selling 12 million copies worldwide, but her next album would be spectacular.

Whitney Houston would take the lead role in the movie "The Bodyguard" along with Kevin Costner. The commercial success of the movie wouldn't compare to the soundtrack, which exclusively featured Whitney. Songs like "I'm Every Woman" and "I Have Nothing" would do alright, but, based on the massively popular "I Will Always Love You", the album would sell an unprecedented 37 million albums worldwide. Houston would do two more soundtracks, for the movies "Waiting to Exhale" and "The Preacher's Wife," combining for 17 million albums sold worldwide. "My Love Is Your Love" would manufacture 13 million more album sales. Her subsequent albums would not enjoy the same success as her earlier ones would.

It is rumored that the money she made from selling 100 million plus albums has most been squandered to her drug habit. Having apparently forgotten about her Diane Sawyer interview on ABC, where she stated "Crack is Whack!", concern for her well-being is the motivating factor behind the publicizing of her addiction. Tina Brown said, "I understand what she is going through. Addiction is a disease. Maybe this interview will help save her life."
Title: Re: Adderall-Law school finals/studying
Post by: kequals1 on August 25, 2006, 05:28:45 PM

Exactly! Cocaine is extremely habit-forming. It is potentially dangerous when indulged in to excess. If rats or monkeys are hooked up to an intravenous source of heroin, they will happily self-administer the drug indefinitely; but they still find time to sleep and eat.

If rats or monkeys can freely self-administer cocaine, however, they will do virtually nothing else. Captive animals continue to press their drug-delivery lever for as long as they are physically capable of doing so. Their fate is similar to an intracranially self-stimulating laboratory rodent. Within weeks, if not days, they will lose a substantial portion of their body weight - up to 40%. Within a month, they will be dead.


Cocaine and amphetamines concentrate in the central link of the reward circuit (the ventral tegmental area and the nucleus accumbens). These areas contain especially high concentrations of dopaminergic synapses, which are the preferred target of these drugs.

Cocaine's effects on other structures such as the caudate nucleus may explain certain secondary effects of this drug, such as increased stereotyped behaviours (nail biting, scratching, etc.)
Title: Re: Adderall-Law school finals/studying
Post by: libor on August 25, 2006, 06:31:24 PM
In the United States, while amphetamines are most commonly used for treatment of attention-deficit disorders and narcolepsy, they are also approved as weight-loss medications in certain cases of obesity. Within the armed forces only, it is also frequently prescribed as an anti-fatigue pill for pilots and other individuals in situations requiring vigilance and alertness.
Title: SPEED IS LIFE; OR IS IT?
Post by: coordinated tie on August 31, 2006, 06:43:35 PM

Within the armed forces only, it is also frequently prescribed as an anti-fatigue pill for pilots and other individuals in situations requiring vigilance and alertness.


(http://www.thegooddrugsguide.com/gallery/images/a_adderall_01.jpg)
Adderall (commercial amphetamine) 30mg tablets - used extensively by US fighter pilots

When Tom Cruise uttered those famous words in the Hollywood blockbuster, 'Top Gun': "I feel a need, a need for speed", he would not have known that his words had already been taken literally by the U.S. Air Force, in a way he could never have imagined. In the latest Jamie Doran documentary, 'the need for speed' exposes how the Pentagon has been issuing a concoction of mind-altering drugs to its soldiers and airmen, resulting in the deaths of allied forces, innocent civilians and, almost certainly, their own men.

Amphetamines, sedatives, anti-nerve agents, adrenaline and a whole variety of vaccines, including anthrax, make up a cocktail of chemicals banned by civilian authorities in the ordinary workplace, yet forced upon pilots flying multi-million dollar jets into combat and Special Forces soldiers operating behind enemy lines. In an extraordinary investigation, American military personnel speak for the first time to explain how they were used as guinea pigs in wars ranging from Panama, the Gulf, Bosnia, Afghanistan and right up until the recent conflict in Iraq. These are not dissidents, nor are they unpatriotic: they love their country and were ready to give their lives in its service. But they can no longer stand by and watch their comrades suffer as the Pentagon pushes more and more drugs onto the frontline.

"I guess I best remember it as almost paranoia. I had a dizziness; I wasn’t falling over dizzy, but there was a little bit of a tumbling sensation going on. I felt paranoia where I was nervous and skittish about what was around me and what was happening. I wasn’t in complete control." Steve Tait: Gulf War Hero "They made you ruthless, just utterly ruthless. I made decisions that I feel now I would not have made. I eliminated individuals that I considered to be a threat, that I would not normally have done." 'Mike': U.S. Special Forces: "A lot of times the fighter pilots say: 'speed is life, speed is life'; in this case, speed became death." Lt. Col Tom Heemstra: F-16 Squadron Cder "Many of the times, the sad part is that they can’t tell if it was real or not. That’s the part that is really frightening."

In this documentary, filmed at locations throughout the United States and Britain, we speak with a former White House 'Drugs Czar' who expresses grave concerns about the use of amphetamines in the military; we interview the man who, as Air Force Chief of Staff, banned the drugs as soon as he took over, only to see them re-introduced after his retirement; we follow the story of one pilot who sacrificed his career in pursuit of the truth; we feature the case of a 'ground' soldier who killed innocent civilians for reasons he cannot understand to this day. We explain how the 'voluntary' nature of dispensing these drugs makes legal nonsense and how the Pentagon may very well be breaking its own laws, to the detriment of its serving men and women; only to establish that, in reality, the U.S. military is a law unto itself. We discover that vital information on 'friendly fire' incidents, including the deaths of nine British soldiers in the Gulf War, has been withheld and we examine the true human costs of wars fought on drugs.

http://www.acftv.com/streaming/wmedia.asp?stream_id=1
Title: Re: Adderall-Law school finals/studying
Post by: mothersmaiden on September 02, 2006, 04:46:23 AM
(http://archives.cnn.com/2002/SHOWBIZ/books/01/17/wurtzel.cnna/story.jpg)
Elizabeth Wurtzel would seem like the kind of person who has it all. A talented writer, a graduate of Harvard, author of the bestsellers "Prozac Nation" and "female dog," she's had a lot of success though only in her mid-30s.

Elizabeth Wurtzel became addicted to Ritalin. She talks about it on her book called "More, Now, Again: A Memoir of Addiction." She says she did not know Ritalin was addictive when she was prescribed it. Wurtzel was prescribed Ritalin in pill form, and then she started crushing the pills and inhaling -- snorting, and that's actually how she became addicted. Because she thought it was safe, she said well, if I take two pills when I'm supposed to take one, that's not so bad. And before you know it, it turns into eight pills, then 16, then eventually taking 40 a day. She was in the hospital for four months to get off it -- Ritalin was to her a huge addiction that eventually extended to other drugs also.
Title: Re: Adderall-Law school finals/studying
Post by: 4DClaw on September 02, 2006, 09:12:25 AM
Doesn't she go to Yale Law School now?

(http://archives.cnn.com/2002/SHOWBIZ/books/01/17/wurtzel.cnna/story.jpg)
Elizabeth Wurtzel would seem like the kind of person who has it all. A talented writer, a graduate of Harvard, author of the bestsellers "Prozac Nation" and "female dog," she's had a lot of success though only in her mid-30s.

Elizabeth Wurtzel became addicted to Ritalin. She talks about it on her book called "More, Now, Again: A Memoir of Addiction." She says she did not know Ritalin was addictive when she was prescribed it. Wurtzel was prescribed Ritalin in pill form, and then she started crushing the pills and inhaling -- snorting, and that's actually how she became addicted. Because she thought it was safe, she said well, if I take two pills when I'm supposed to take one, that's not so bad. And before you know it, it turns into eight pills, then 16, then eventually taking 40 a day. She was in the hospital for four months to get off it -- Ritalin was to her a huge addiction that eventually extended to other drugs also.
Title: Re: Adderall-Law school finals/studying
Post by: gobi on September 05, 2006, 06:38:43 AM

Doesn't she go to Yale Law School now?


Indeed! A 38 years-old woman still attending school! LOL! Anyway, here it a short, but quite interesting bio:

Elizabeth Wurtzel (born July 31, 1967 in New York City, New York, USA) is an American writer. Brought up Jewish, she attended Ramaz for high school. While an undergraduate at Harvard College, she wrote for "The Harvard Crimson" and received the 1986 Rolling Stone College Journalism Award. She has battled heroin abuse and addiction to cocaine and Ritalin. As of 2005, Wurtzel is currently attending Yale Law School.

Wurtzel is most known for publishing her groundbreaking memoir, "Prozac Nation," at the age of 26. The book chronicles her battle with depression while a college undergraduate. The film adaptation of "Prozac Nation," starring Christina Ricci, premiered at the Toronto International Film Festival September 8, 2001 but never had a U.S. theatrical release. It was telecast on the Starz! network during March, 2005 and was released on DVD in the summer of 2005. In her second book, "female dog," she wrote that feminist writing had become "dry" and she wanted to make it "juicy" again. She focused on what was praiseworthy about "bad girls" such as Amy Fisher. She also published a second autobiographic volume with the title "More, Now, Again: A Memoir of Addiction" (2001), which is centered on drug addiction. She has also written for The New Yorker and New York Magazine.

9/11 remarks

Controversy erupted over comments Wurtzel, who lived near the World Trade Center in New York, made about the September 11, 2001 attacks, during an interview with Jan Wong about the "Prozac Nation" sequel, "More, Now, Again: A Memoir of Addiction." She was quoted in a February 16, 2002, article by Wong titled, "That's enough about me, now, what do you think of me?", for The Globe and Mail in Toronto:

Quote
My main thought was: What a pain in the ass... I had not the slightest emotional reaction. I thought, this is a really strange art project... It was a most amazing sight in terms of sheer elegance. It fell like water. It just slid, like a turtleneck going over someone's head... It was just beautiful. You can't tell people this. I'm talking to you because you're Canadian... I just felt like everyone was overreacting. People were going on about it. That part really annoyed me... I cried about all the animals left there in the neighbourhood... I think I have some kind of emotional block. I think I should join some support group for people who were there... You know what was really funny? After the fact, like, all these different writers were writing these things about what it was like, and nobody bothered to call me.
Title: Re: Adderall-Law school finals/studying
Post by: m e s m e r on September 05, 2006, 06:47:27 AM
Why are guys imposing us this Wurtzel thing here? She's gone to the point of getting hooked to heroin, what kind of f**cking example does she set for law students? I'd understand someone who uses from time to time Adderall and Ritalin, maybe even coke, but heroin?! Elizabeth Wurtzel may be beautiful, but sorry, she's a whore!
Title: Re: Adderall-Law school finals/studying
Post by: sowle on September 06, 2006, 01:25:40 AM

Why are guys imposing us this Wurtzel thing here? She's gone to the point of getting hooked to heroin, what kind of f**cking example does she set for law students? I'd understand someone who uses from time to time Adderall and Ritalin, maybe even coke, but heroin?! Elizabeth Wurtzel may be beautiful, but sorry, she's a whore!


What does heroin abusing have to do with being a whore?
Title: Re: Adderall-Law school finals/studying
Post by: 4DClaw on September 06, 2006, 03:00:26 AM
I'd assume there's a strong positive correlation. But I forgot what heroin abuse has to do with law school...


Why are guys imposing us this Wurtzel thing here? She's gone to the point of getting hooked to heroin, what kind of f**cking example does she set for law students? I'd understand someone who uses from time to time Adderall and Ritalin, maybe even coke, but heroin?! Elizabeth Wurtzel may be beautiful, but sorry, she's a whore!


What does heroin abusing have to do with being a whore?
Title: Re: Adderall-Law school finals/studying
Post by: c u b e on September 06, 2006, 05:27:05 PM

But I forgot what heroin abuse has to do with law school...


Beth Wurtzel, a heroin abuser, is going to Yale law school.
Title: THE GREAT A.D.D. HOAX
Post by: c u b e on September 06, 2006, 05:35:03 PM

If you think that you might legitimately hvae ADHD then see a doctor. There is a book called Driven to Distraction that is an excellent resource. If you recieve a diagnosis you may be perscribed medication and/or therapy. 

If not, then stand up and do this on your own merits. The results of taking the drugs could be unpredictable at best, and you will underminine your own sense of achievement. 


ADHD is a myth!

by David Keirsey

The reason I speak of a hoax in the case of "attention deficit disorder" is that there is no such "mental disorder" to "diagnose" and "treat." And the reason I speak of a great hoax is that the less competent medical practitioners use this phony "diagnosis" as a warrant to "treat" millions of school children (over 5,000,000) per year by intoxicating them with brain-disabling narcotics.

And make no mistake about the power of Ritalin to disable and eventually shrink the brain. It differs little in its destructive effects from cocaine and the amphetamines, and is fast becoming the drug of choice among addicts in high schools and colleges. Children in middle schools and high schools who are required to take Ritalin daily at school are now selling their pills to their friends who want to get a quick fix. Of late the victims of pill pushers are fast becoming pill pushers themselves!

Medical practitioners have chosen the word 'attention' as the key to one of 400 or so "mental disorders" they've listed in their "diagnostic manual." They say that some children don't "have" enough attention to succeed in school, and that it is wise to try to increase their attention with stimulant drugs. They say these children can't pay attention even if they try to.

But psychologists and other behavioral scientists say attention is a form of consciousness, hence a hypothetical mental event and not something that can be observed. Of course by noting what a child is doing we can guess what that child is paying attention to, and guesswork is OK for trying out different kinds of social intervention with children. But it's not OK for trying out different kinds of physical intervention. The latter can, and often does, have irreversible consequences which are far worse than the "disorder" that is being "treated" (in the case of Ritalin, stunting of growth, brain atrophy, loss of muscular control, loss of self-regard).

Clearly medical intervention differs markedly from psychological intervention. Medical practitioners treat disorders while corrective counselors counsel persons. Counselors join children in their social context, medics invade children's brains-it's social intervention versus physical interference.

According to the medical manual of mental disorders there are ten symptoms of attention deficit which are said to cause the impairment of attention. Most of these allegedly causal symptoms are that a child pays too little attention to assignments, the rest being that this child pays too much attention to things other than assignments. When these symptoms are assumed to be present the claim is that they cause impairment of the child's capacity to attend to assignments.

One problem with this idea is that what the medics call "symptoms" are supposed to be observable, that is visible or audible signs of something wrong. But attention is not visible or audible. Rather it's something that we guess is going on in the brain of the person we're observing, when all we can see or hear is what the person is doing. When a school boy is observed just sitting and seemingly doing nothing it's impossible to tell what he's paying attention to. Of course it's obvious he's not actively engaged in doing his assignment; whatever he's thinking about can only be a matter of conjecture.

The other problem with the idea of attention deficit is that the medics apparently believe it is caused by its symptoms. For sure the medics have got it backwards, and some of us are surprised that they haven't noticed such an obvious error. Even though medical practitioners aren't scientists they ought to know better than that. It's preposterous to say that the symptoms of attention deficit cause the deficit of attention. Even though preposterous, the medics seem to mean what they say. For example they say that "Some hyperactive-impulsive or inattentive symptoms that cause impairment must have been present before age 7 years." Also they say that "Some impairment from the symptoms must be present in at least two settings (e.g. at school [or work] and at home)." [DSM IV, italics mine]

If I were a medic Id be embarrassed by this sort of talk, and I suppose that the more competent medics are somewhat embarrassed by this obvious error. In any case the essay on attention deficit in the DSM-IV is so poorly written that it's a wonder anybody takes it seriously. Unfortunately a lot of medical practitioners in America do take it seriously and even (to my embarrassment) so do some psychologists.

By the way, European children seem immune to the disease so the market for Ritalin is largely confined to America.

The expression "A.D.D." is relatively new in the medical lexicon. Before its arrival on the scene educators had other names to call the children who did poor work at school, expressions such as  "educationally handicapped," "learning disabled," "dyslexic," and other impressive but undefined designations. But since invoking the magical "A.D.D." label quickly gets children zapped and zombied with Ritalin, with no questions asked about the teacher's part in the child's behavior, small wonder that the other disguised pejoratives used by educators are used less frequently.

THE TEN "CAUSAL SYMPTOMS" OF "A.D.D." LISTED IN THE DSM IV:

RARELY DO children AFFLICTED "WITH A.D.D."
  1) OBEY SCHOOLWORK DIRECTIVES
  2) SUSTAIN ATTENTION TO SCHOOLWORK
  3) BOTHER WITH SCHOOLWORK DETAILS
  4) TRY TO AVOID DISTRACTIONS FROM SCHOOLWORK
  5) TRY TO AVOID MISTAKES IN DOING SCHOOLWORK
  6) LISTEN TO THE TEACHER'S DIRECTIVES
  7) REMEMBER SCHOOL ROUTINES
  8  PREPARE FOR SCHOOLWORK
  9) ORGANIZE SCHOOLWORK TASKS
 10) LIKE TO DO SCHOOLWORK

The claim is that children can't do these things because there's something wrong with their brains. Nobody has come up with any evidence that it's their brain that's at fault, but they keep looking for it, certain that sooner or later they'll find it. In the meantime they fall back on the idea that there's some sort of "chemical imbalance" in the brains of these children which can be set right by brain altering chemicals. This is nonsense and they know it, but it quiets the fears of parents regarding the negative consequences of using these drugs. What the parents aren't told is that stimulants, like sedatives and tranquilizers, are brain disabling drugs.
Title: Re: Adderall-Law school finals/studying
Post by: c u b e on September 06, 2006, 05:36:38 PM
LET'S EXAMINE THESE SIGNS OF IMPAIRMENT ONE BY ONE:

1) DOESN'T OBEY SCHOOLWORK DIRECTIVES-"often does not follow through on instructions and fails to finish schoolwork...."

Certain kinds of children are interested neither in pleasing certain kinds of teachers nor in doing their assignments. Most of these children are similar in temperament, and very different from their classmates. Most often they are Plato's "Artisans" (Aristotle's "Hedonics")-concrete in perception and impulsive in action, ever on the lookout for fun things to do in the here and now. With this sort of temperament it is not surprising that most schoolwork is unappealing to them. They, far more than other kinds of temperament, are prone to ignore or forget the order to do their assigned work. This is disinterest in the teacher's agenda, not inability to comply with it, and disinterest can hardly be taken as evidence of brain dysfunction. The problem is really a clash between two kinds of temperament: those who value opportunities to have fun and those who value schedules for getting work done.

2) DOESN'T SUSTAIN ATTENTION TO SCHOOLWORK-"often has difficulty sustaining attention in tasks..."

The claim here is that it's hard for such children to continue working on assignments even if they want to. But this presupposes that the child is trying to pay attention but fails in his attempt. It could be that his attention is elsewhere and that he's not trying to maintain attention on some task. If there's nothing in the assignment that appeals to this sort of temperament-concrete, impulsive, players-then it's unlikely that such children will want to continue doing it. The children I've known like this (in 20 years of casework) can sustain attention to tasks they're interested in for a very long time. Indeed, it's sometimes hard to tear them away from such tasks. And while it makes sense to blame temperament for this flagging interest in schoolwork, it's definitely unwise to blame the brain for it.

3) DOESN'T BOTHER WITH SCHOOLWORK DETAILS-"often fails to give close attention to details"

Those same concrete impulsives that won't bother with the details of schoolwork are usually capable of attending to details that their teacher can't even see, if the details are part of some exciting activity. But it is rather naive and a little foolish to expect them to attend to the details of clerical work such as practice in spelling, handwriting, grammar, or arithmetic. It's not that they can't attend to such matters, but that they don't care to. Sorry, but the brain is in no way implicated by this bothersome "symptom."

4) DOESN'T TRY TO AVOID DISTRACTIONS FROM SCHOOLWORK-"is often easily distracted by extraneous stimuli"

Again, if they're not interested in pleasing their teacher, why should these concrete impulsives try to ward off the distractions that often occur so often in most classrooms? Letting themselves be distracted is a welcome relief from filling in the empty spaces on the mimeographed form on their desk. Concrete-impulsive option-oriented children are indeed "easily distracted" from what must seem to them useless exercises in futility. The degree of distractibility in a given child is determined entirely by the attractiveness of the assignment. As before, don't blame the brain, blame rather the disparity of aims on the part of teacher and pupil.

5) DOESN'T TRY TO AVOID MISTAKES IN DOING SCHOOLWORK-"makes careless mistakes in schoolwork..."

Certain kinds of children are careful and certain others are carefree. Trying to be accurate in doing assignments is not of much interest to the concrete impulsive types, who usually put as little effort as possible in doing school work. It isn't that they make mistakes as much as it is that they don't want to bother with such work. The tacit assumption is that the reason for their mistakes is that they can't keep their mind on their work. But this has to be a faulty assumption, it being much more likely that they're not interested in keeping their mind on their work. The medics got it right this time: these children make "careless mistakes" because they couldn't care less about the work they're supposed to do.

6) DOESN'T LISTEN TO THE TEACHER'S DIRECTIVES-"often does not seem to listen when spoken to directly"

These children are listening all right, even though they're not looking at the teacher. Why not? Because the teacher's usually getting after them for not working on their assignment. For that matter, even adults of this temperament won't look at whoever is giving them a bad time for their shortcomings. Why then expect children to? Doubtless they don't want to hear what's being said to them, but because they're smarter perceptually than other types they'll hear it all. Far from being deficient in this kind of attention, they are usually proficient in it, more proficient than other types of temperament.

7) DOESN'T REMEMBER SCHOOL ROUTINES-"is often forgetful in daily activities"

Some children just don't take to schedules. And when they grow up they still don't. The medics may have gotten this one right. These children do indeed forget things that are scheduled. Not because their brain won't let them, but because they simply aren't interested in such things. Indeed, some are temperamentally predisposed not only to ignore schedules but to resist them, because schedules preclude options. This is especially true of the more impulsive children who like to do exciting things on the spur of the moment (ten or twelve children per class). Small wonder that they remain oblivious to school routines- "daily activities"-when at any moment, if they keep their eyes peeled, some fun activity may show up. Remember that options and schedules do not mix very well.

8  DOESN'T PREPARE FOR SCHOOLWORK-"often loses things necessary for activities...."

The children that are on the lookout for fun options have no interest in getting prepared to go to work on those dull assignments they are supposed to complete. "Be prepared" is not exactly their motto. Indeed, theirs is more likely to be something like "grab ahold or lose out" or "go for it," something like that. Equipment to be used for upcoming activities, especially schoolwork, is of little concern to those who want to do interesting things here and now. Can't blame the brain for that.

9) DOESN'T ORGANIZE SCHOOLWORK TASKS-"often has difficulty organizing tasks and activities"

I'm surprised that the medics seem not to know that it's the teacher's job to design and schedule assignments, not the child's. The child's job is to do the assigned task and not "organize" it. I'm afraid the medics got this one wrong, but that's understandable because they know very little about what goes on in schools. In this case both the child's brain and temperament are exonerated.

10) DOESN'T LIKE TO DO SCHOOLWORK-"often avoids, dislikes, or is reluctant to engage in tasks that require sustained mental effort..."

Bingo! The medics hit the nail right on the head. For sure these concrete impulsives don't like to expend the amount of effort required to concentrate on what they consider to be trivial pursuits. Let's face it, some teachers give dull assignments which bore and annoy certain temperaments, especially those boys that are very concrete and practical in their interests and abilities. It is natural that such a child "avoids, dislikes, and is reluctant to engage" in what are to him boring tasks. Give the perceptive-impulsive child a concrete and practical assignment and he will eagerly "engage in it" and will "like" doing it. In this neither brain nor temperament is guilty.
Title: Re: Adderall-Law school finals/studying
Post by: c u b e on September 06, 2006, 05:36:53 PM
SIGNS OF IMPAIRMENT

Medics claim they can observe these ten signs of impaired consciousness. But that's nonsense because consciousness is not observable. So the ten signs of A.D.D. are merely guesses and therefore cannot be seriously considered as either criteria or symptoms of some hypothetical deficit of consciousness. And to claim that these bogus symptoms actually cause an impairment of consciousness is simply preposterous.

It is therefore evil that they persist in experimenting with brain disabling drugs to get children to do as they are told.

Bear in mind that school children are told to do three things: 1) stay put, 2) keep quiet, and 3) get to work. The so-called A.D.D. afflicted child obeys the first two directives, but disobeys the third: he stays put, keeps quiet, but doesn't get to work. His reason for dragging his heels is that he probably doesn't like to do schoolwork (criterion #10), at least the kind that the less capable teacher assigns him. It's as simple as that. It's ridiculous to probe around in his brain to see if there's something wrong with it. And its preposterous to disable his brain with drugs to "help him focus on his lessons." The problem is curriculum content and instructional method, not brain defect.

Remember that the medics who prescribe stimulant narcotics, in order to be licensed to practice, are required to swear the oath of Hippocrates that they will "do no harm." Yet each of them violates that oath by doing irreparable harm to children, even four year olds, who are merely attending to their own business instead of their teacher's.

There's nothing wrong with these children. Their inborn temperament prevents these concrete, fun loving, and impulsive children from adapting to the school. Some day in the not so distant future the school may come to realize that not all children can be scheduled and routinized, that children, like adults, are fundamentally different in this regard. Perhaps then the school might adapt itself to those children that do not fit its curriculum or its methods of instruction. Neither special education nor experimental narcotherapy is the way to treat children who disobey orders to get to work. After all, it isn't so much that these children can't work as it is that they don't want to work.

IN THE MEANTIME

It is not at all difficult to induce this type of child-concrete in thought and speech, utilitarian in pursuit of aims-to do his school work. Indeed, it is much easier to get the "inattentive" child to attend to the teacher's agenda than it is to get the "hyperactive" child to stop bothering his teacher and his classmates. In both cases, however, the solution is essentially the same: take away the abused privilege whenever it is abused, without comment.

The hyperactive child is dismissed when he does anything to disrupt the class, which is to say he loses the privilege of being a member of the class because he abused it. Those who want to learn how to do this  are advised to read my paper titled Abuse it-Lose it. The following is addressed to those who want to learn how to deprive a child of his privilege of being given assignments by his teacher, bearing in mind that the greatest privilege any schoolboy has is being assigned tasks by a teacher who is trying to educate him.

Some parents and teachers are aghast at the very idea of depriving a child of assignments-and without comment to boot! They usually predict that, deprived of assignments, such a child will be content to pursue his own interests and will be delighted that the teacher is no longer urging him to get to work. But wait. And not for long, depending, of course, on the age of the child. Those children with long experience of maneuvering teachers into getting after them to do their work will take longer than those without much experience of this kind.

You see, children don't know that being assigned tasks by their teacher is a privilege rather than an imposition. So they have to learn it the hard way. They have to experience being left out.. In their view the other kids seem to be busy doing their lessons and interacting now and then with the teacher, while the one deprived of lessons is being ignored. This sort of treatment gets old, quick, again depending on the child's experience.

It is then that the child discovers something very important to him: that he wants to get assignments just like the other kids. The truth of the matter is that he soon discovers that he doesn't have much of an agenda of his own to pursue. Oh, sure, he can find distractions now and then to occupy his attention, but these do not come often and they're not all that interesting anyway.

Now, if the child's teacher and parents can button their lips so that they don't tell the child about how important it is to do one's schoolwork, it shouldn't take very long before the child asks his teacher if he can have assignments like the rest. This kind of deprivation has to be done without commercials, without object lessons, without pep talks, without urging, reminding, or coaxing in any manner whatsoever. If the teacher reveals her hole card she'll lose the bet. Given a pep talk on the virtues of obediently doing ones schoolwork clues the child into what's going on. Knowing what's up he need only do nothing, and the teacher is forced to go back to getting after the child to do his work. Back to square one.

I do not suggest that the war is over with only one battle won. There will be others because this sort of child is really not interested in most of the assignments he'll get. So sooner or later there'll be some backsliding, in which case the abuse-it-lose-it method should be re-applied. The nice thing about asking for assignments is that by getting practice in reading, writing, listening, and talking in class the child gets better at doing these things and so increases his self-confidence, self-respect, and, in the long run, self-esteem. Eventually an interest in schooling may emerge, and the child need no longer struggle with teachers bout doing schoolwork. It is not in the nature of such children to become scholars, but they are unlikely, as many of their type are, to become dropouts when schooling becomes too irksome.

http://keirsey.com/addhoax.html
Title: Re: Adderall-Law school finals/studying
Post by: uni on September 06, 2006, 06:35:01 PM

Cocaine's effects on other structures such as the caudate nucleus may explain certain secondary effects of this drug, such as increased stereotyped behaviours (nail biting, scratching, etc.)


Lip licking. Frequent lip-licking is another symptom of cocaine use.
Title: Re: Adderall-Law school finals/studying
Post by: chin on September 11, 2006, 06:52:01 AM

Adderall is "speed." Hope that helps.

P.S. When I used used to take Adderall and Ritalin per prescription, it completely killed my sex drive, which sucked.


Dr. Mary Holley, obstetrician and chairperson of Mothers Against Methamphetamine, informed the Associated Press that one's initial hit of meth is the equivalent of ten orgasms all on top of each other, each lasting for 30 minutes to an hour, with a feeling of arousal that lasts for another day and a half. She is quick to confess that the effect doesn't last long: "After you've been using [meth] about six months or so, you can't have sex unless you're high. After you have been using it a little bit longer you can't have sex even when you're high. Nothing happens. [Your penis] doesn't work."
Title: Re: Adderall-Law school finals/studying
Post by: niels on September 12, 2006, 07:43:11 AM

[...] informed the Associated Press that one's initial hit of meth is the equivalent of ten orgasms all on top of each other, each lasting for 30 minutes to an hour, with a feeling of arousal that lasts for another day and a half. [...]


Sounds it's more powerful than the good 'ole crack!
Title: Re: Adderall-Law school finals/studying
Post by: phi on September 12, 2006, 07:39:00 PM
The good 'ole crack?! You're speaking empathetically of crack?! Can't believe it!!!
Title: Re: Adderall-Law school finals/studying
Post by: einszweidrei on September 14, 2006, 04:24:23 AM

Dr. Mary Holley, obstetrician and chairperson of Mothers Against Methamphetamine, informed the Associated Press that one's initial hit of meth is the equivalent of ten orgasms all on top of each other, each lasting for 30 minutes to an hour, with a feeling of arousal that lasts for another day and a half. She is quick to confess that the effect doesn't last long: "After you've been using [meth] about six months or so, you can't have sex unless you're high. After you have been using it a little bit longer you can't have sex even when you're high. Nothing happens. [Your penis] doesn't work."


;)
Title: Re: Adderall-Law school finals/studying
Post by: robmelone on September 16, 2006, 05:24:16 PM
Where did you get your adderall?  Did you get your doctor to prescribe, get in online or go to Mexico?  I was just in TJ and I forgot to check the prices.

Rob
http://www.cafepress.com/lawthug (http://www.cafepress.com/lawthug)
Title: Re: Adderall-Law school finals/studying
Post by: PennoyerLives on September 22, 2006, 02:04:14 PM
I find it very interesting how people get so defensive and/or offended on this topic. I think it has to do with the inherent competitiveness in law school students. Since Adderall has the conception of a "study drug" to those who don't take it, the natural reaction is that the person who is taking it is cheating or getting an edge. So, the defense mechanism kicks in and it is immediately demonized. If it works for you, so be it. But, please don't pass judgment if you know nothing about the drug. Save the zealous comments for Bible study.
Title: Re: SPEED IS LIFE; OR IS IT?
Post by: victorase on September 25, 2006, 12:21:16 AM

(http://www.thegooddrugsguide.com/gallery/images/a_adderall_01.jpg)


30mg is too strong they say .. in fact some time ago we heard about an ass at our school who snorted the entire 30mg and almost died .. he went to ER with shortness of breath, vomiting and atrial fibrillation, no heart attack thou
Title: Re: Adderall-Law school finals/studying
Post by: mph on September 26, 2006, 03:52:43 AM


I'd assume there's a strong positive correlation. But I forgot what heroin abuse has to do with law school...


I can agree with this .. much of the addiction literature presents heroin addicts as sexless drones; the idea is that the desire for heroin becomes much greater than the desire for sex, and the only "scoring" the addict is interested in has to do with what goes on in his veins rather than what happens in his pants. While this may be true for some addicts, the story is often more complex. Far more heroin users appear to be "chippers" than "addicts." Chippers are non-addicted casual users. And while the rush you get from heroin may have little influence on the relationships between sex and heroin, that rush is sometimes described as feeling like a full-body orgasm. This is also said to be true for crack cocaine.
Title: Endorphins: Free Smack!
Post by: el on October 08, 2006, 09:44:13 PM
When you cycle, swim, run, or carry out any other form of strenuous endurance exercise, your pituitary gland releases substantial quantities of 'endorphins', chemicals which can block sensations of pain and produce overall feelings of euphoria. Endorphins are known to attach to 'receptors' on the outer surfaces of brain cells, acting like chemical keys which fit into locks. If enough endorphin is inserted into the outer 'keyhole' of a nerve cell, that cell is unlikely to convey pain messages to the conscious part of the brain.

Endorphins were discovered almost by accident in the 1970s when scientists were carrying out research on drug addiction. Investigators had wondered for years why the human brain contained receptors for chemicals produced by the poppy plant, and they eventually discovered why: the brain produces its own set of neurochemicals which are actually far more potent than morphine, opium, and heroin but share the same neural receptors with these drugs.

The naturally produced brain chemicals, called the endorphins and enkephalins, are released in times of stress. They can make a mangled accident victim as serene as a Buddhist monk, and they can also make an athlete feel great after an extremely vigorous workout. The latter effect is sometimes referred to as the 'runner's high', and the post-exercise surge in endorphins helps to explain why many exercisers seem to become addicted to their sport. Their workouts become 'fixes' which mask the pain of everyday living, and even injuries or illnesses can't stop the training process because the athlete is relentlessly searching for endorphin-induced mood elevations
Title: Re: Adderall-Law school finals/studying
Post by: esta on October 09, 2006, 09:54:17 PM
Where did you get your adderall?  Did you get your doctor to prescribe, get in online or go to Mexico?  I was just in TJ and I forgot to check the prices.

Rob
http://www.cafepress.com/lawthug (http://www.cafepress.com/lawthug)


rob, have you tried this site, do they deliver?

http://www.herbalsmokeshops.com/
Title: Re: Endorphins: Free Smack!
Post by: ñ on October 16, 2006, 04:20:09 AM

When you cycle, swim, run, or carry out any other form of strenuous endurance exercise, your pituitary gland releases substantial quantities of 'endorphins', chemicals which can block sensations of pain and produce overall feelings of euphoria. Endorphins are known to attach to 'receptors' on the outer surfaces of brain cells, acting like chemical keys which fit into locks. If enough endorphin is inserted into the outer 'keyhole' of a nerve cell, that cell is unlikely to convey pain messages to the conscious part of the brain.

Endorphins were discovered almost by accident in the 1970s when scientists were carrying out research on drug addiction. Investigators had wondered for years why the human brain contained receptors for chemicals produced by the poppy plant, and they eventually discovered why: the brain produces its own set of neurochemicals which are actually far more potent than morphine, opium, and heroin but share the same neural receptors with these drugs.

The naturally produced brain chemicals, called the endorphins and enkephalins, are released in times of stress. They can make a mangled accident victim as serene as a Buddhist monk, and they can also make an athlete feel great after an extremely vigorous workout. The latter effect is sometimes referred to as the 'runner's high', and the post-exercise surge in endorphins helps to explain why many exercisers seem to become addicted to their sport. Their workouts become 'fixes' which mask the pain of everyday living, and even injuries or illnesses can't stop the training process because the athlete is relentlessly searching for endorphin-induced mood elevations


I was under the impression that running had first and firemost to do with the release of endogenous adrenaline and that runners were typical adrenaline junkies.
Title: Re: Endorphins: Free Smack!
Post by: hewlett on October 17, 2006, 05:21:23 PM

I was under the impression that running had first and firemost to do with the release of endogenous adrenaline and that runners were typical adrenaline junkies.


Running is not considered a "high risk" sport -- and it is the latter that trigger the release of endogenous adrenaline (epinephrine :) So you are correct in that people who engage in extreme sports that cause the release of endogenous epinephrine are epi junkies but not when you say that runners are such. Che Guevara was literally an adrenaline junkie, for instance: danger released the hormone that allowed him to breathe freely.

Be aware, however, that the adrenaline rush in participants of extreme sports is a misnomer, since often the rush or high obtained is also product of increased levels of dopamine, endorphins and serotonin.
Title: Re: Endorphins: Free Smack!
Post by: hitbox on October 17, 2006, 05:28:46 PM

Che Guevara was literally an adrenaline junkie, for instance: danger released the hormone that allowed him to breathe freely.


They say Che Guevara used extensively an adrenaline inhaler to deal with shortness of breath attacks due to his asthma. Something similar to this

(http://img212.imageshack.us/img212/8231/primatenemistinhaler15mlenlargemw1.jpg)

Title: Re: THE GREAT A.D.D. HOAX
Post by: dmitrik4 on October 17, 2006, 07:22:28 PM

THE TEN "CAUSAL SYMPTOMS" OF "A.D.D." LISTED IN THE DSM IV:

RARELY DO children AFFLICTED "WITH A.D.D."
  1) OBEY SCHOOLWORK DIRECTIVES
  2) SUSTAIN ATTENTION TO SCHOOLWORK
  3) BOTHER WITH SCHOOLWORK DETAILS
  4) TRY TO AVOID DISTRACTIONS FROM SCHOOLWORK
  5) TRY TO AVOID MISTAKES IN DOING SCHOOLWORK
  6) LISTEN TO THE TEACHER'S DIRECTIVES
  7) REMEMBER SCHOOL ROUTINES
  8  PREPARE FOR SCHOOLWORK
  9) ORGANIZE SCHOOLWORK TASKS
 10) LIKE TO DO SCHOOLWORK


damn, sounds like every kid's dream task list.  when you were a kid, did you do most of the stuff on that list?  or did you try to avoid it at every turn?  hell yes you did...that's part of being a kid.  that stuff is BORING...even now.

i only did it b/c my parents would kick my ass if i didn't.  that's some brilliant analysis.
Title: Re: Adderall-Law school finals/studying
Post by: mynor142 on October 19, 2006, 06:36:47 PM
Just a couple points that ought to be made here -

First, you are self-medicating which is never a good course of action because, among other things, you really don't know how much, if any, adderall you should take to counteract the negative tendencies you have (e.g. inability to stay focused) without impairing your strongest attributes.  To say that a doctor would probably diagnose you based on the list of "symptoms" posted by dmitrik4 is meaningless.  Adderall is one of the most highly regulated prescription drugs on the market because it is so casually abused by people with the exact same mind set as the one you profess.  If you need it, a doctor will give it to you.  To rationalize your failure to go an get a diagnosis and obtain a prescription by saying that you don't want to be bound to taking it borders on idiocy for several reasons - first, a prescription does not mandate use, far from it. In reality, it gives you the power to choose when you take it.  Second, taking adderall without a prescription is illegal, and possession of a controlled substance without a prescription is illegal.  Being that you hope to pass the moral fitness review to be able to sit for a bar exam, it would in your best interest to cross the t's and dot the i's on this issue, cause one stroke of bad luck could put you in a very bad position.  Third, as i stated above, you don't know what is a good amount for you and what is a bad amount for you, assuming that you do in fact need it.  A doctor can shed some light on this for you and find the ideal dosage for you, and contrary to what you might think, if you express to your doctor that your intention is to take it primarily when you have finals or serious work to get done, not only will that not preclude your obtaining a prescription, but they can probably give you some really good insight on how to get the most out of it.

Secondly, there seems to be a large contingent of people on here with the "holier than thou" mindset, who think that taking adderall borders on blowing a line of coke.  To those people i would simply say that you should be thankful for your abilities, and thankful that its not something you need.  I would also point out that some people do need it, that while over diagnosed, ADD is a real condition, not just a cop out.  I would recommend reading up on it and educating yourself a bit more before throwing out sweeping generalizations.  To claim that adderall is the same as coke is like claiming that taking advil for a headache is as bad as smoking opium, they aren't anywhere close to each other, save only that they are both stimulants.

Third - all this talk of habit forming and tolerance - speaking from the standpoint of someone who has taken adderall consistently for close to a decade I can attest to it being habit forming to the extent that when you stop taking it suddenly you will feel very lethargic and tired for several days, but it is not addictive in the sense that you go through painful withdrawals and cravings or anything of that nature.  On the other hand, I can also attest to the fact that if you take it AS PRESCRIBED you do not build up a tolerance to it.  I have taken it for ten years, and i take the same dosage now as i did ten years ago, and it is just as effective.

In summary, while i understand trying to give yourself an edge, there are other, safer means of doing so than self-medicating with black-market pharmaceuticals.  You obviously will do what you want, but personally, i would really recommend going about it the right way rather than the wrong way.

Title: Re: Endorphins: Free Smack!
Post by: scaling on October 20, 2006, 10:41:56 PM

They say Che Guevara used extensively an adrenaline inhaler to deal with shortness of breath attacks due to his asthma. Something similar to this

(http://img212.imageshack.us/img212/8231/primatenemistinhaler15mlenlargemw1.jpg)


Primatene Mist will be banned.

Jan 24, 2006

WASHINGTON - Asthma sufferers may not be able to buy nonprescription inhalers much longer because the devices contain propellants that harm the ozone layer.

An advisory panel voted 11-7 Tuesday to recommend that the Food and Drug Administration remove the "essential use" status that Primatene Mist and other similar non-prescription inhalers require to be sold, spokeswoman Laura Alvey said. Final revocation of that status would mean a de facto ban on their sale.

The FDA usually follows the advice of its outside panels of experts, though a decision can take months. If the agency opts to follow the recommendation, it would begin a rulemaking process that would include public comment, Alvey said.


http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/11008530/
Title: Re: Adderall-Law school finals/studying
Post by: pheromon on October 20, 2006, 11:55:26 PM

Cocaine and amphetamines concentrate in the central link of the reward circuit (the ventral tegmental area and the nucleus accumbens). These areas contain especially high concentrations of dopaminergic synapses, which are the preferred target of these drugs.


Here it is the limbic reward circuit:

(http://img208.imageshack.us/img208/2951/limbicrewardcircuitmf2.jpg)

The major neuromodulators used by the diffuse projection neurons of the brainstem are norepinephrine, serotonine, acetylcholine and dopamine.

The locus coeruleus contains most of the neurons that produce norepinephrine in the brain. They send projections to just about every part of the CNS. Located in the dorsal portion of the pons, these cells are strongly activated by new sensori stimuli. They play a role in regulating vigilance and attentiveness and are inactive during sleep. Overactivity of this system can cause anxiety, while underactivity can lead to depression.

The neurons of the raphe nuclei release serotonin as a neurotransmitter. These neurons are grouped into about 9 pairs, distributed along the entire length of the brainstem. They project very widely throughout the CNS. The more rostral nuclei innervate the cortex and the thalamus, while the more caudal nuclei innervate the cerebellum and the spinal cord. These latter nuclei appear to work in conjunction with the norepinergic neurons: they are active during waking periods, and quiet during sleep. In addition to being involved in the sleep/wake cycle, they also appear to affect mood.

Diffuse projection neurons that use acetylcholine as a neurotransmitter are found in the ventral region of the telenchephalon and the rostral portion of the pons. Nearly three-quarters of all acetylcholine in the cortex comes from the basal nucleus of Meynert, while the pedunculopontine nucleus and the lateral tegmental pontine nucleus project to the thalamus. The lymbic system also receives acetylcholine from the medial septal nucleus which is believed to contribute to vigilance and neuronal plasticity, thus playing an important role in learning and memory. The memory loss associated with Alzheimer's disease is probably linked to the deterioration of this cholinergic system.

The two groups of neurons that diffuse dopamine are located in the lower portion of the midbrain. The substantia nigra projects to the striatal structures (caudate nuclei and putamen). The degeneration of this nigrostriatal pathway that accompanies Parkinson's disease produces the trembling and the difficulty in initiating movement that characterizes this illness. Other dopamine-producing cells project from the ventral tegmental area to the frontal cortex and to most of the structures in the limbic system. This system appears to be reinforcing certain behaviors by associating them with pleasurable sensations. It also seems to be associated with the mechanisms involved in substance dependencies and in schizophrenia.

(http://img213.imageshack.us/img213/4730/brainfg8.gif)
Title: Re: Adderall-Law school finals/studying
Post by: frisky on October 30, 2006, 01:22:49 AM
It looks like we're going to dissect every piece of the @ # ! * i n g brain ...
Title: Re: Adderall-Law school finals/studying
Post by: egolaw on November 03, 2006, 07:29:28 PM
LOL frisky, I know what ya mean ;)
Title: Re: Adderall-Law school finals/studying
Post by: eatdrinkbemerry on November 06, 2006, 05:13:48 AM
i need to stop taking all these stimulants and chain smoking,it can't be healthy.
Title: Re: Adderall-Law school finals/studying
Post by: theworldinahand on November 06, 2006, 09:34:48 PM
well, eatdrink, you'll either eat and drink, or be marry, you can't have it both ways .. :)
Title: Re: Adderall-Law school finals/studying
Post by: chibud2 on December 09, 2006, 09:33:33 PM
Has anyone been on ecstasy when studying/taking exams? I know E is the last drug to use in such occasions, but some people say it's just as effective as speed, for example ..
Title: Don't @ # ! * With Amphetamines!
Post by: rankit on January 04, 2007, 04:22:55 AM
(http://i12.tinypic.com/2rxyx48.jpg)
(http://i18.tinypic.com/2jfzhty.jpg)
(http://i16.tinypic.com/2nk6ixx.jpg)
(http://i3.tinypic.com/2mxqwkw.jpg)
(http://i13.tinypic.com/441ly4x.jpg)
(http://i1.tinypic.com/30lkwab.jpg)
Title: Psychoactives: Venn Diagram
Post by: the butterfly effect on February 20, 2007, 05:54:01 AM
(http://img95.imageshack.us/img95/8166/76995994gw0.jpg)
Title: Re: Adderall-Law school finals/studying
Post by: oopslaw on May 13, 2007, 10:04:06 PM
Cocaine use is very widespread at big law firms. At Cadwalader, for example, they report BLATANT coke use in offices and the men's restrooms.
Title: Re: Adderall-Law school finals/studying
Post by: peniesonthedollar on May 14, 2007, 12:19:58 AM
Using amphetamines/cocaine is mental doping. You are trying to enhance your ability to think faster, read more effectively, concentrate more strongly and for a longer period of time. I guess some other external tool to allow lawyers to more quickly and thoroughly understand the twisted rhetorics of say, Judge Posner. 

Yet, the fact remains that such stimulants are much like the performance enhancing anabolic steroids for athletes. The deleterious side effects of testosterone, for example, are very bad indeed. Carcinogenesis. Increased atherosclerosis. Impotence. Among other things. In women testosterone along with building muscle, causes a permanent loss of feminity. Facial hair. Lowering of the voice. Infertility. Some pretty bad things to endure just to be competitive.

All athletic programs at all levels are very correct to ban all illegal drugs in their sport. Street drugs and anabolic steroids to be sure. I can remember in high school our football and basketball coaches forbidding us to smoke and drink alcohol. Eventually of course demon Rum became a part of our lives, but many of us were spared serious disease by never smoking. To those coaches I say thank you and Amen. Anabolic steroids work. They build muscle. They kill and harm health. Cocaine works. It helps you do tons of work. It causes harm to your health, even kills you; and it is very effective at that.
Title: Re: Adderall-Law school finals/studying
Post by: coquita on May 15, 2007, 01:00:03 PM
Yeah, some people openly took adderal at my school in front of their study group. Now they are being reported to the dean and possibly the bar ethics committee if the dean doesn't act.


It's not worth flushing your years at law school down the toilet just to stay awake a few more hours
Title: Re: Adderall-Law school finals/studying
Post by: StevePirates on May 21, 2007, 07:32:31 PM
While I don't support the use of drugs without a prescription, I also think that narc'ing on people for taking Adderal is pathetic.  I imagine the people who reported were concerned about the "unfair advantage", wrong profession for those people.

On the other hand, if they reported the Adderal-takers in order to eliminate competition then that's some twisted gamesmanship.

Yeah, some people openly took adderal at my school in front of their study group. Now they are being reported to the dean and possibly the bar ethics committee if the dean doesn't act.


It's not worth flushing your years at law school down the toilet just to stay awake a few more hours
Title: Re: Adderall-Law school finals/studying
Post by: lawgirl442 on June 07, 2007, 02:59:24 PM
Maybe it's just me, but you'd better f-ing believe that I would narc on someone for taking Adderall for exams without a prescription.  Just like I'd narc on someone for stealing a copy of the test, or buying the answers off of the internet.  I don't know how much of an advantage Adderall would give a person, but doing anything illegal to get a better score is kind of pathetic.  And yes, I would "tattle" on you.  Because if you do something illegal, something that I *could've* done but didn't because I'm following the law, then you're putting me at a disadvantage, and frankly, I don't appreciate it.

So if you're going to blatantly do illegal things in front of your study group, you better hope I'm not in it.

Title: Re: Adderall-Law school finals/studying
Post by: verbal on June 08, 2007, 12:02:00 PM
IF i was taking aderal (which i dont) and someone told on me I would deny it then sue them for slander. I guess thats just me though
Title: Re: Adderall-Law school finals/studying
Post by: lawgirl442 on June 08, 2007, 02:50:31 PM
IF i was taking aderal (which i dont) and someone told on me I would deny it then sue them for slander. I guess thats just me though

Man, that coupled with the multiple spelling errors in each one of your posts...the folks must be proud...
Title: Re: Adderall-Law school finals/studying
Post by: verbal on June 08, 2007, 03:13:04 PM
at least they didnt raise a rat
Title: Re: Adderall-Law school finals/studying
Post by: lawgirl442 on June 08, 2007, 03:27:15 PM
No, they just raised a drug abusing (because you seem to have put a lot of thought into what you would do if someone caught you..) mentally challenged future-ambulance-chaser...

Congratulate them for me...
Title: Re: Adderall-Law school finals/studying
Post by: verbal on June 08, 2007, 04:08:46 PM
i think u under estimate how quickly i can think on my feet.

Title: Re: Adderall-Law school finals/studying
Post by: coquita on June 08, 2007, 04:22:02 PM
As far as I know the dean was notified but chose not to take action. Didn't even question those involved. I am personally shocked. Aren't they supposed to certify their students for moral fitness? Oh well...no wonder us lawyers have bad reps.
Title: Re: Adderall-Law school finals/studying
Post by: gainsay on August 12, 2007, 01:17:57 AM

Maybe it's just me, but you'd better f-ing believe that I would narc on someone for taking Adderall for exams without a prescription.


Here honey,


Cocaine use is very widespread at big law firms. At Cadwalader, for example, they report BLATANT coke use in offices and the men's restrooms.

Title: Re: Adderall-Law school finals/studying
Post by: s o l i l o q u y on September 05, 2007, 01:32:38 AM
I hear when you take adderall you end up cleaning your room more than study ... but it's just me who's listening to the wrong people..
Title: Re: Adderall-Law school finals/studying
Post by: PITH on September 10, 2007, 10:27:26 PM
Maybe soliloquy.
Title: Re: Psychoactives: Venn Diagram
Post by: ena on April 25, 2008, 09:45:52 AM

(http://img95.imageshack.us/img95/8166/76995994gw0.jpg)


Interesting username, butterfly! It reminded me right away the technical notion of sensitive dependence on initial conditions in Chaos Theory I read. Small variations of the initial condition of a non-linear dynamical system that may produce large variations in the long term behavior of the system. So this is sometimes presented as esoteric behavior, but can be exhibited by very simple systems: for example, a ball placed at the crest of a hill might roll into any of several valleys depending on slight differences in initial position. The phrase refers to the idea that a butterfly's wings might create tiny changes in the atmosphere that ultimately cause a tornado to appear (or prevent a tornado from appearing). The flapping wing represents a small change in the initial condition of the system, which causes a chain of events leading to large-scale phenomena. Had the butterfly not flapped its wings, the trajectory of the system might have been vastly different.

The idea that one butterfly could have a far-reaching ripple effect on subsequent events seems first to have appeared in a 1952 short story by Ray Bradbury about time travel, although Lorenz made popular the term. In 1961, Lorenz was using a numerical computer model to rerun a weather prediction, when, as a shortcut on a number in the sequence, he entered the decimal .506 instead of entering the full .506127 the computer would hold. The result was a completely different weather scenario. Lorenz published his findings in a 1963 paper for the New York Academy of Sciences noting that "One meteorologist remarked that if the theory were correct, one flap of a seagull's wings could change the course of weather forever." Later speeches and papers by Lorenz used the more poetic butterfly. According to Lorenz, upon failing to provide a title for a talk he was to present at the 139th meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 1972, Philip Merilees concocted Does the flap of a butterfly's wings in Brazil set off a tornado in Texas as a title.

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/b/b9/TwoLorenzOrbitsSmall.jpg)
These figures show two segments of the three-dimensional evolution of two trajectories (one in blue, the other in yellow) for the same period of time in the Lorenz attractor starting at two initial points that differ only by 10-5 in the x-coordinate. Initially, the two trajectories seem coincident, as indicated by the small difference between the z coordinate of the blue and yellow trajectories, but for t > 23 the difference is as large as the value of the trajectory. The final position of the cones indicates that the two trajectories are no longer coincident at t=30.
Recurrence, the approximate return of a system towards its initial conditions, together with sensitive dependence on initial conditions are the two main ingredients for chaotic motion. They have the practical consequence of making complex systems, such as the weather, difficult to predict past a certain time range (approximately a week in the case of weather).

Title: DEAD FROM ONLINE PILL OVERDOSE
Post by: libra on May 22, 2008, 10:43:38 AM

While I don't support the use of drugs without a prescription, I also think that narc'ing on people for taking Adderal is pathetic. [...]


Do not take lightly this whole thing -- people are dying from these pills! Here it is a story!

WIDOW: My husband died from online drugs

(http://i.l.cnn.net/cnn/2008/HEALTH/05/21/online.drugs/art.mail.order.drugs.03.cnn.jpg)

WICHITA, Kansas (CNN) -- She found her husband on their bed in a pool of his own vomit, dead from an accidental overdose of drugs he received from an online pharmacy. Every night before her husband went to bed, he would open a prescription bottle of the muscle relaxant Soma and swallow the 8 or 9 pills it took for him to fall asleep, said the woman. She spoke to CNN on condition of anonymity because she wants to protect her husband's identity and not embarrass his family. The drugs arrived at their doorstep every week. She thought they were being prescribed by a treating physician. Her husband had been in a car accident and suffered back pain, and Soma was the one drug that could relieve the aches. She was wrong. The drugs were purchased online without a doctor's visit. She says that her husband had become an addict -- and that the Internet sites that sold him the drugs were his pushers. "Absolutely," she said. "That's exactly what they are. These pharmacy people that are doing this and these doctors that are doing this, they don't give a dadgummit about people. It's just the almighty dollar; that's all it is." Rusty Payne, a spokesman with the Drug Enforcement Administration, agreed. The abuse of pharmaceuticals "is one of the biggest drug problems we are dealing with," he said.

"The Internet is the biggest culprit," Payne said.

About $39 million in cash, bank accounts, property and computers were seized in 2007 as a result of Internet drug investigations, he said. In 2004, the figure was $11.9 million. The DEA has formed an initiative with Google, Yahoo! and AOL to warn people about buying drugs online. Between 2005 and 2007, Payne said the official warning popped up nearly 80 million times. A CNN investigation shows just how easy it is to purchase prescription drugs online without a legitimate prescription, revealing a growing new battle in the war on drug abuse. To prove it, a CNN investigative reporter went to linepharmacy.com, which advertises a long list of prescription drugs for sale. The site sent back an e-mail saying "all orders made are still subjected to Doctor's evaluation." The reporter placed two orders for anti-depressants with the site: one for Prozac, the other for Elavil. A health survey on the site was already filled in. The reporter submitted a credit card and a shipping address. Within 24 hours, the Prozac had arrived at the reporter's front door. The Elavil arrived two days later. Both prescription bottles had a doctor's name and pharmacy on the label. The reporter had neither seen a doctor nor talked to a doctor on the phone. In fact, he hadn't even heard of the doctor listed on the bottle.

Carmen Catizone, the executive director of the National Association of Boards of Pharmacy, which works to implement and enforce uniform pharmaceutical standards, said prescription drugs are the new crack and heroin, and Internet sites that sell them are the new drug dealers. Except narcotics, Catizone said, "you can order virtually any drug in the world by simply clicking a mouse and going to various Web sites that exist out there." His group blames unscrupulous doctors for writing prescriptions without ever seeing the patients or even reviewing their medical records. It has created a list of nearly 80 sites selling online drugs that it recommends people not use. It is illegal in every state for doctors to prescribe medicines to patients whom they do not know across state lines. It is also illegal in most states for pharmacies to ship prescriptions to where they have no license to operate. The National Association of Boards of Pharmacy has tried to lobby Congress, asking for some federal oversight or federal prosecution to stem the tide of illegal Internet pharmacies.

But Catizone says legislators gave the board a chilly response: "'Show us the dead bodies,' and if that was me or my family, that's a pretty sad statement for our legislators to give." It is unknown just how many people have died from overdoses related to these online drug sales. It is also unknown how many people have tried to commit suicide with drugs bought online, as Nancy Fitzpatrick of Washington state tried to do earlier this year. She showed CNN her prescription for Soma. The drugs were delivered by a pharmacy in American Fork, Utah, and prescribed by a doctor in Long Island, New York. "I wanted to end it, I wanted to die," "Fitzpatrick said, describing how she swallowed about 130 pills after she fell into a deep depression. Fitzpatrick, the sister of CNN investigative producer David Fitzpatrick, says she had no contact with the doctor or the pharmacy. The doctor, Kareem Tannous, lives in a $4-million estate on Long Island and runs three health clinics. When confronted about the prescriptions in front of his Valley Stream, New York, clinic, Tannous hustled to his car and drove off without answering any questions. Workers inside Roots Pharmacy in American Fork, Utah, also refused to answer questions about why Fitzpatrick's prescriptions from Tannous were filled. The office in the small foothill town has a bolted security door and closed-circuit security cameras. The workers inside refused to even open the door or provide the name of the owner. In the reception area on the first floor, dozens of boxes of Federal Express envelopes were waiting to be filled. While CNN cameras rolled, one of the workers emptied a large clear plastic trash bag filled with empty wholesale prescription drug bottles. Most of the containers were labeled Carisoprodol, the generic name of the muscle relaxant Soma.

"They need to be stopped," Fitzpatrick said of the doctors and pharmacies involved. "It just boggles my mind that it's so simple."
Title: Re: DEAD FROM ONLINE PILL OVERDOSE
Post by: inner on May 22, 2008, 11:49:05 AM

While I don't support the use of drugs without a prescription, I also think that narc'ing on people for taking Adderal is pathetic. [...]


Do not take lightly this whole thing -- people are dying from these pills! Here it is a story!

WIDOW: My husband died from online drugs

(http://i.l.cnn.net/cnn/2008/HEALTH/05/21/online.drugs/art.mail.order.drugs.03.cnn.jpg)

WICHITA, Kansas (CNN) -- She found her husband on their bed in a pool of his own vomit, dead from an accidental overdose of drugs he received from an online pharmacy. Every night before her husband went to bed, he would open a prescription bottle of the muscle relaxant Soma and swallow the 8 or 9 pills it took for him to fall asleep, said the woman. She spoke to CNN on condition of anonymity because she wants to protect her husband's identity and not embarrass his family. The drugs arrived at their doorstep every week. She thought they were being prescribed by a treating physician. Her husband had been in a car accident and suffered back pain, and Soma was the one drug that could relieve the aches. She was wrong. The drugs were purchased online without a doctor's visit. She says that her husband had become an addict -- and that the Internet sites that sold him the drugs were his pushers. "Absolutely," she said. "That's exactly what they are. These pharmacy people that are doing this and these doctors that are doing this, they don't give a dadgummit about people. It's just the almighty dollar; that's all it is." Rusty Payne, a spokesman with the Drug Enforcement Administration, agreed. The abuse of pharmaceuticals "is one of the biggest drug problems we are dealing with," he said.

"The Internet is the biggest culprit," Payne said.

About $39 million in cash, bank accounts, property and computers were seized in 2007 as a result of Internet drug investigations, he said. In 2004, the figure was $11.9 million. The DEA has formed an initiative with Google, Yahoo! and AOL to warn people about buying drugs online. Between 2005 and 2007, Payne said the official warning popped up nearly 80 million times. A CNN investigation shows just how easy it is to purchase prescription drugs online without a legitimate prescription, revealing a growing new battle in the war on drug abuse. To prove it, a CNN investigative reporter went to linepharmacy.com, which advertises a long list of prescription drugs for sale. The site sent back an e-mail saying "all orders made are still subjected to Doctor's evaluation." The reporter placed two orders for anti-depressants with the site: one for Prozac, the other for Elavil. A health survey on the site was already filled in. The reporter submitted a credit card and a shipping address. Within 24 hours, the Prozac had arrived at the reporter's front door. The Elavil arrived two days later. Both prescription bottles had a doctor's name and pharmacy on the label. The reporter had neither seen a doctor nor talked to a doctor on the phone. In fact, he hadn't even heard of the doctor listed on the bottle.

Carmen Catizone, the executive director of the National Association of Boards of Pharmacy, which works to implement and enforce uniform pharmaceutical standards, said prescription drugs are the new crack and heroin, and Internet sites that sell them are the new drug dealers. Except narcotics, Catizone said, "you can order virtually any drug in the world by simply clicking a mouse and going to various Web sites that exist out there." His group blames unscrupulous doctors for writing prescriptions without ever seeing the patients or even reviewing their medical records. It has created a list of nearly 80 sites selling online drugs that it recommends people not use. It is illegal in every state for doctors to prescribe medicines to patients whom they do not know across state lines. It is also illegal in most states for pharmacies to ship prescriptions to where they have no license to operate. The National Association of Boards of Pharmacy has tried to lobby Congress, asking for some federal oversight or federal prosecution to stem the tide of illegal Internet pharmacies.

But Catizone says legislators gave the board a chilly response: "'Show us the dead bodies,' and if that was me or my family, that's a pretty sad statement for our legislators to give." It is unknown just how many people have died from overdoses related to these online drug sales. It is also unknown how many people have tried to commit suicide with drugs bought online, as Nancy Fitzpatrick of Washington state tried to do earlier this year. She showed CNN her prescription for Soma. The drugs were delivered by a pharmacy in American Fork, Utah, and prescribed by a doctor in Long Island, New York. "I wanted to end it, I wanted to die," "Fitzpatrick said, describing how she swallowed about 130 pills after she fell into a deep depression. Fitzpatrick, the sister of CNN investigative producer David Fitzpatrick, says she had no contact with the doctor or the pharmacy. The doctor, Kareem Tannous, lives in a $4-million estate on Long Island and runs three health clinics. When confronted about the prescriptions in front of his Valley Stream, New York, clinic, Tannous hustled to his car and drove off without answering any questions. Workers inside Roots Pharmacy in American Fork, Utah, also refused to answer questions about why Fitzpatrick's prescriptions from Tannous were filled. The office in the small foothill town has a bolted security door and closed-circuit security cameras. The workers inside refused to even open the door or provide the name of the owner. In the reception area on the first floor, dozens of boxes of Federal Express envelopes were waiting to be filled. While CNN cameras rolled, one of the workers emptied a large clear plastic trash bag filled with empty wholesale prescription drug bottles. Most of the containers were labeled Carisoprodol, the generic name of the muscle relaxant Soma.

"They need to be stopped," Fitzpatrick said of the doctors and pharmacies involved. "It just boggles my mind that it's so simple."


She is so right to have denounced the whole thing -- her husband would not have died were it not for these online pharmacies!
Title: Re: Adderall-Law school finals/studying
Post by: vögeln on November 12, 2008, 01:59:02 PM
Jesus, in a very worried state, convened all of his apostles and disciples to an emergency meeting because of the high drug consumption problem all over the earth.

After giving it much thought they reached the conclusion that in order to better deal with the problem, that they should try the drugs themselves and then decide on the correct way to proceed. It was therefore decided that a commission made up of some of the members return to earth to get the different types of drugs.

The secret operation is effected and two days later the commissioned disciples begin to return to heaven. Jesus, waiting at the door, lets in the first disciple:

"Who is it?"

"It's Paul" Jesus opens the door.

"What did you bring Paul?"

"Hashish from Morocco" "Very well son, come in."

"Who is it?"

It's Mark" Jesus opens the door.

"What did you bring Mark?"

"Marijuana from Colombia" "Very well son, come in."

"Who is it?"

"It's Matthew" Jesus opens the door.

"What did you bring Matthew ?"

"Cocaine from Bolivia" "Very well son, come in."

"Who is it?"

"It's John" Jesus opens the door.

"What did you bring John ?"

"Crack from New York" "Very well son, come in."

"Who is it?"

It's Luke" Jesus opens the door.

"What did you bring Luke ?"

"Speed from Amsterdam" "Very well son, come in."

"Who is it?"

"It's Judas" Jesus opens the door.

"What did you bring Judas ?"

"The FBI, YOU SCUMBALLS! EVERYONE ASSUME THE POSITION AGAINST THE WALL!"
Title: Eternal Recurrence
Post by: beret on December 12, 2008, 10:56:53 AM

Interesting username, butterfly! It reminded me right away the technical notion of sensitive dependence on initial conditions in Chaos Theory I read. Small variations of the initial condition of a non-linear dynamical system that may produce large variations in the long term behavior of the system. So this is sometimes presented as esoteric behavior, but can be exhibited by very simple systems: for example, a ball placed at the crest of a hill might roll into any of several valleys depending on slight differences in initial position. The phrase refers to the idea that a butterfly's wings might create tiny changes in the atmosphere that ultimately cause a tornado to appear (or prevent a tornado from appearing). The flapping wing represents a small change in the initial condition of the system, which causes a chain of events leading to large-scale phenomena. Had the butterfly not flapped its wings, the trajectory of the system might have been vastly different.

The idea that one butterfly could have a far-reaching ripple effect on subsequent events seems first to have appeared in a 1952 short story by Ray Bradbury about time travel, although Lorenz made popular the term. In 1961, Lorenz was using a numerical computer model to rerun a weather prediction, when, as a shortcut on a number in the sequence, he entered the decimal .506 instead of entering the full .506127 the computer would hold. The result was a completely different weather scenario. Lorenz published his findings in a 1963 paper for the New York Academy of Sciences noting that "One meteorologist remarked that if the theory were correct, one flap of a seagull's wings could change the course of weather forever." Later speeches and papers by Lorenz used the more poetic butterfly. According to Lorenz, upon failing to provide a title for a talk he was to present at the 139th meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 1972, Philip Merilees concocted Does the flap of a butterfly's wings in Brazil set off a tornado in Texas as a title.

(http://img255.imageshack.us/img255/6931/chaosf2et9.jpg)

These figures show two segments of the three-dimensional evolution of two trajectories (one in blue, the other in yellow) for the same period of time in the Lorenz attractor starting at two initial points that differ only by 10-5 in the x-coordinate. Initially, the two trajectories seem coincident, as indicated by the small difference between the z coordinate of the blue and yellow trajectories, but for t > 23 the difference is as large as the value of the trajectory. The final position of the cones indicates that the two trajectories are no longer coincident at t=30. Recurrence, the approximate return of a system towards its initial conditions, together with sensitive dependence on initial conditions are the two main ingredients for chaotic motion. They have the practical consequence of making complex systems, such as the weather, difficult to predict past a certain time range (approximately a week in the case of weather).


Do I have a Choice, a Chance, to Make Each Return a Little Different? A Little Better?

No choice, no chance, no different, no better . . . (and no worse).

Each time you return it's exactly the same you. If there were the slightest infinitesimal difference, the butterfly effect would not only radically change your entire life and the future course of human history but radically change the whole future of the universe such that at the incredibly large number of years after which you are supposed to return, you wouldn't be there since the universe would be radically different.

That's how well connected you are to the universe.
Title: Re: Adderall-Law school finals/studying
Post by: mlgr on December 12, 2008, 11:04:59 AM
Where did you get your adderall?  Did you get your doctor to prescribe, get in online or go to Mexico?  I was just in TJ and I forgot to check the prices.

Rob
http://www.cafepress.com/lawthug (http://www.cafepress.com/lawthug)


rob, have you tried this site, do they deliver?

http://www.herbalsmokeshops.com


Check these boards out - you'll learn there that there's no way you can get Adderall without a prescription.

http://www.drugbuyers.com/freeboard/ubbthreads.php/ubb/cfrm
Title: Re: Adderall-Law school finals/studying
Post by: DirkDiggler on December 13, 2008, 06:01:10 PM
A former-gf had a Ritalin RX for diagnosed ADD. The diagnosis also allowed her, per (undergrad) university policy, 50% more exam time and private-room testing.

Has anyone heard of any accommodations in LS?
Title: Re: Adderall-Law school finals/studying
Post by: K? on December 15, 2008, 06:36:33 AM
I've heard of getting concessions for the LSAT, I don't know about law school exams.  I wouldn't be surprised if you could get more time if you'd registered with the school's SDS, but I wouldn't really be surprised if you couldn't either.

I've been diagnosed since 1st grade (hence being on LSD when I have my Ks exam in three hours) and I've always thought the whole time concessions thing was a bit ridiculous, especially for those who are already medicated.  Time is such an integral part of what makes both the LSAT and law school tests so tricky, it doesn't seem to me that ADD justifies the advantage that comes with having more time.
Title: Re: Adderall-Law school finals/studying
Post by: ram0036 on December 15, 2008, 06:46:35 AM
I have heard of accomodations because of ADHD/ADD for law school exams. They would get additional time, like an hour extra I think and they would also get to take their exam alone.
Title: Re: Adderall-Law school finals/studying
Post by: Cabra on December 15, 2008, 09:27:36 AM
I've heard of getting concessions for the LSAT, I don't know about law school exams.  I wouldn't be surprised if you could get more time if you'd registered with the school's SDS, but I wouldn't really be surprised if you couldn't either.

I've been diagnosed since 1st grade (hence being on LSD when I have my Ks exam in three hours) and I've always thought the whole time concessions thing was a bit ridiculous, especially for those who are already medicated.  Time is such an integral part of what makes both the LSAT and law school tests so tricky, it doesn't seem to me that ADD justifies the advantage that comes with having more time.

Fellow ADHDer here, although I wasn't diagnosed until age 23 (it was a life changing revelation). I know accommodations are available, but I can't imagine why any person with ADHD would want more time. A private room makes a lot of sense, but the knowledge that I've got more time would only encourage distraction for me. A benefit of ADHD is the ability to hyper-focus in certain situations, and time pressure works great for a lot of folks with ADHD (hence all the procrastination).

And yeah, if you're properly medicated, you shouldn't need accommodations anyway.
Title: Re: Adderall-Law school finals/studying
Post by: kel on May 14, 2009, 07:40:43 AM

Check these boards out - you'll learn there that there's no way you can get Adderall without a prescription.

http://www.drugbuyers.com/freeboard/ubbthreads.php/ubb/cfrm


I'd strongly object to allowing posting of online boards URL addresses where people can get dangerous stuff - even if that's not exactly Adderol.
Title: Re: Adderall-Law school finals/studying
Post by: Routing No. on May 14, 2009, 08:44:07 AM

I'd strongly object to allowing posting of online boards URL addresses where people can get dangerous stuff - even if that's not exactly Adderol.


It's Adderall, not Adderol, kel!
Title: Re: Adderall-Law school finals/studying
Post by: mcgeorge2011 on June 18, 2009, 06:46:22 AM
I would advise against taking adderall to help with studying unless you have a px. I actually do, and the drug has some different effects then some think. For myself, if I actually take more than normal I either feel so 'good' I dont want to study. Also, like most drugs, if I take it 3 days in a row on that third day I am extremely irratative. Any thing like a car driving only slightly faster than the speed limit would make me pissed. Oh, and the last thing, and this is pretty easily checked by playing tetris. When on the amphetitmines you feel like you score higher than you usually do (thus playing tetris, if you cover up the score on the screen, and guess what your points are at the end of the game when you are not on the pills you will be more accurate, when you are on them you will actually think you did better (but in actuality) you usually score a little less than normal. Again, these things all very from person to person, and some will benefit from the pills. Even having an Px, I need to very my dosages day to day. And never take it for the first time the day before having an exam, you wont like the results.

Hope this helps some people, I dont want to sound like a hipocrait since I take it myself, and if you really think you need it, might as well just see a psychiatrist, they are usually pretty quick to put you on a low dosage (legally) and see how your body reacts rather than starting on your own guessing how much to take (and how it interacts synergetically with other meds (even over the counter stuff) in ways you wouldnt think).

Wish everyone good luck on Law School. You all made it here, so the odds are if you are working hard enough to be even looking at these pages you can pass (even if not at the head of your class... but if you are taking drugs for that reason alone you really should see the school shrink, there is a big difference taking stuff like this to pass versus being better than anyone else). And yes my spelling is herendous, I was a neuroscience major undergrad and they dont teach us how to spell ;)
Title: Re: Adderall-Law school finals/studying
Post by: amanda.tyer on August 13, 2009, 04:07:43 AM
Actually I do not see any bad in taking pills that help you coping you with various situations just like exams that last about three to four hours. Things like that are really stressful and it is quite unhealthy to be stressed in such a high level amount. Of course I am definitely not talking about drug abuse or using    hallucinogenic drugs, but I think to cope with stress it is absolutely okay to use pills for stress. I had a very heavy exam and I was so nervous and stressed out that I couldn't even concentrate for a single second. It really freaked me out. I called my mother and she came over two hours before the exam started and brought me some pills she uses for stress, called flexeril, and they really helped me out. I was quite skeptical in the beginning, but as I found an enlightening feeling inside my brain and my body I was able to concentrate on the most important matter of the day. My exam. So I guess situations like that are absolutely adequate for using pills for stress.
Title: Re: Adderall-Law school finals/studying
Post by: GoVols on August 13, 2009, 08:41:50 PM
Keep taking Adderall if it helps you and finds no diagreement with your mental balance. For palpable results you'd have to take it continuously over a period of time.

For tests as important as the LSAT and law school exams, it's far from cheating. In fact, you'd be cheating yourself not to. It's

a) not chemically or physically addictive

b) far more advanced than ritalin, speed, common cocaine, meth (I bet you didn't know that JP Sartre used to take an advanced form of dexedrine, Adderall's first cousin, to increase his cognitive agility when writing)

c)has no correlation towards anything life threatening or mind-altering ... you're not going to end up emptying catheter bags as a parolee, or see a plummetting trend in your life because of little adderall to channel sights. 

You know why SPEED wreaks havoc? Because it's made on the street and improperly. A real chemist in decent conditions makes it, it's going to have the legitimate effects minus the sideffects of the filler. Even the most contrian psychiatrist is going to tell you  that 25 mgs of Adderall is nothing like cocaine or methamphetamines. 

Don't let puritanical impositions dissuade you if you think the stuff increases your composure and confidence. You're using it to help you take tests, not to get a better high or a bigger ego. And if you start associating a drug with studious activity and exam prepartion, dear god, you are going to end up hopelessly addicted ... to high achievement. Who checked that box on their inpatient survey at the methadone clinic?

Adderall is extremely addictive.  Who told you it wasn't?

Title: Re: Adderall-Law school finals/studying
Post by: Matthies on August 14, 2009, 07:45:28 AM
I could not make it through a day without of school or work adderal, I'm soo ADDD that...wait what were we talking about? I think its addictive in that the days I don;t take it I notice it right away. But I don't take it everyday anymore unless I have work to do.
Title: Re: Adderall-Law school finals/studying
Post by: Cloret on February 06, 2012, 01:44:09 PM

Check these boards out - you'll learn there that there's no way you can get Adderall without a prescription.

http://www.drugbuyers.com/freeboard/ubbthreads.php/ubb/cfrm


I'd strongly object to allowing posting of online boards URL addresses where people can get dangerous stuff - even if that's not exactly Adderol.


Don't you worry, kel, that board does not work any more - unless, of course, administrators are not willing to let new members register because they want the latter to have a "contact" - an already-member of the network who'll e-mail 'em a username/password combo.

I wouldn't be surprised, though - I would tend to think that many undercover LE people likely visited the boards, reason why they've probably closed registration for new members.

The site, though, was not per se a "bad thing" - it offered people a way to find online the meds they desperately needed - the ones they're unscrupulously denied by their doctors - because the DEA scares the * & ^ % out of them, if they prescribe, say, just a little bit more pain medicine to a patient in excruciating back pain, for instance.

I do not doubt there may have been a few "bad apples," people who wanted to find places to order controlled substances for recreational purposes - that's when Addiction problems arise - such would be a good reason why it is probably better that the site does not work now anymore.

This is just my impression .. I could be wrong, taken into account that I just guessing on many issues  and/or I'm telling you here what I've read on the net or heard from desperate people in pain.

If you the math, though - compare the number of people who used the site to obtain the meds without which they could not lead a bearable life, to those who abused medication ('cuz I wouldn't call it "substance abuse," as the drugs ordered were in fact "meds," as opposed to hard drugs sold "illegally" - being, in actuality, so easily accessible - all over America), it'd seem that the site was a "necessary evil," so to speak.

Yanno, it's all about the @ # ! * i n g money!
Title: Re: Adderall-Law school finals/studying
Post by: Country Day on February 10, 2012, 03:09:12 PM

Check these boards out - you'll learn there that there's no way you can get Adderall without a prescription.

http://www.drugbuyers.com/freeboard/ubbthreads.php/ubb/cfrm


I'd strongly object to allowing posting of online boards URL addresses where people can get dangerous stuff - even if that's not exactly Adderol.


Don't you worry, kel, that board does not work any more - unless, of course, administrators are not willing to let new members register because they want the latter to have a "contact" - an already-member of the network who'll e-mail 'em a username/password combo.


Looks like the drugbuyers site is totally "in the closet," so to speak ;)
Title: Re: Adderall-Law school finals/studying
Post by: LincolnLover on February 13, 2012, 02:28:46 PM

I'd strongly object to allowing posting of online boards URL addresses where people can get dangerous stuff - even if that's not exactly Adderol.


It's Adderall, not Adderol, kel!

Maybe if she took it she'd know that.  ;)
And maybe you need to get back on your OCD meds. Who cares? ::)
Title: Re: Adderall-Law school finals/studying
Post by: CWFirm on August 28, 2012, 10:38:48 AM
Here's an interesting article on Adderall usage in universities, which I think can easily extend to law school: http://www.opposingviews.com/i/health/addiction/college-students-and-adderall-now-american-standard.

Something to think about: ADD and ADHD are over diagnosed in the US.  It seems like everyone THINKS they have ADD.  Just because you're mind occasionally wanders doesn't necessarily mean you have ADD. 
Title: Re: Adderall-Law school finals/studying
Post by: SoCalLawGuy on September 11, 2012, 01:54:38 AM
I agree, every parent thinks their kid has ADD or ADHD, why is that ? I was also hyperactive as a child and when it came to taking exams as an adult I always had problems focusing.  It's normal! I was stressed, every exam is stressful in one way or another.