Law School Discussion

Law Students => Current Law Students => Topic started by: Mary on April 19, 2005, 03:55:21 PM

Title: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: Mary on April 19, 2005, 03:55:21 PM
When times get tough (finals nearing, papers due and the like) what do you say/do to keep you going so you don't throw in the towel?
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: Wild Jack Maverick on April 19, 2005, 05:00:46 PM
I usually say something such as "thank goodness, the paper is completed, I studied and I have written plenty of notes."

http://www.umanitoba.ca/faculties/arts/economics/cameron/success.html
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: Mary on April 19, 2005, 05:55:24 PM
I appreciate the link!  Thanks a bunch!  I guess I'm asking because they say law students have the highest rate of despression and I really don't want to go down that path!


I usually say something such as "thank goodness, the paper is completed, I studied and I have written plenty of notes."

http://www.umanitoba.ca/faculties/arts/economics/cameron/success.html
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: NoelleMyBelle on April 20, 2005, 09:39:45 PM
Be around other people--don't go it alone.  If you are getting frustrated/depressed, find another law student to hang with.  You can study together, encourage each other, set limits (study one more hour and then ICE CREAM, etc.).  Just keep things in perspective and NEVER turn to artificial crap like drugs or alcohol to help you cope.

Lots of depression and lots of addiction....pretty sad.
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: zemog on April 20, 2005, 10:12:17 PM
Do I really want to flush all this $ down the drain?
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: klaw on April 23, 2005, 08:03:32 AM
I like to spend one day just concentrating on one subject. That way I don't have to lug all the books around and that overwhelming feeling doesn't kick in. Today for example is Civ Pro day and I'm working on my outline and reviewing all of the cases, trying to work out the answers to old exams, etc. This might not work for all people (who might get bored doing Civ Pro all day), but I find it better and easier to concentrate than looking at the Property book in the corner and going "Oh crap, I have so much to do!"
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: SavoyTruffle on April 23, 2005, 08:23:41 AM
adderall and masturbation
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: rapunzel on April 23, 2005, 04:18:32 PM
I drop all my books and head off to the woods for an hour and I run or hike.  It makes me feel better and helps me put in a full day of study.  I also promise myself rewards.  I decide if I get everything on my list for the day done then my husband is taking me out to dinner.  He likes this too since he never gets to see me this time of year.
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: Mary on April 24, 2005, 10:55:07 AM
Thanks! I must be far behind!

adderall and masturbation
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: Hip Hop Lawyer on April 25, 2005, 06:19:10 PM


Pray, exericise, and only hang out with people who are positive.

Drop all the negativity that is in your life because negativity brings you down.

Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: dft on April 25, 2005, 08:32:33 PM
good advice
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: Danielle on April 25, 2005, 11:06:50 PM
I usually say something such as "thank goodness, the paper is completed, I studied and I have written plenty of notes."

http://www.umanitoba.ca/faculties/arts/economics/cameron/success.html

thanks for the link - that's a good web site
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: Mary on April 26, 2005, 01:08:44 PM
Even though this is very simple & brief- it's very good!

Thank you! ;)



Pray, exericise, and only hang out with people who are positive.

Drop all the negativity that is in your life because negativity brings you down.


Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: carrie on April 26, 2005, 09:11:57 PM
 :D




Pray, exericise, and only hang out with people who are positive.

Drop all the negativity that is in your life because negativity brings you down.


Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: Hip Hop Lawyer on April 26, 2005, 10:36:03 PM

Your welcome Mary.

 8)

I find that doing the simple things helps to motive your inner self. Alot of people trying to make too many gradutual changes only to watch themselves quit or fail. Its all about doing simple things, taking small steps because then it all adds up.
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: theexterminator on April 27, 2005, 08:05:45 PM
Some people do drugs, which is the stupidest thing one can do.
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: SavoyTruffle on April 29, 2005, 06:05:20 PM
Some people do drugs, which is the stupidest thing one can do.

Not necessarily... I can think of far stupider things
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: Mary on April 29, 2005, 07:12:59 PM
What's stupider than drugs?? :-\

Some people do drugs, which is the stupidest thing one can do.

Not necessarily... I can think of far stupider things
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: NoelleMyBelle on April 29, 2005, 10:53:01 PM
Suicide?
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: Danielle on April 30, 2005, 10:31:31 PM
Really, drugs ARE suicide . . . in a way
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: carrie on April 30, 2005, 10:36:55 PM
Isn't that a little extreme?

I haven't heard any stories of law students committing suicide.  Though I'm sure it's happened!

Suicide?
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: NoelleMyBelle on April 30, 2005, 11:05:10 PM
Oh, I don't know anyone who had, I just thought it would be more stupid than drug use.  And yes, I agree that drug use is like a really slow suicide.  Or sometimes fast, depending on the circumstances. 

Drugs are bad. I'd never do drugs.  (Does anyone remember "Penny" from when we were little...Saturday morning cartoons...she had a hamster?)
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: gusrip98 on May 02, 2005, 11:34:39 AM
Penny always looked like she was on a bad acid trip
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: NoelleMyBelle on May 02, 2005, 09:18:51 PM
Blasphemy!
Penny always looked like she was on a bad acid trip
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: finko on May 03, 2005, 05:25:00 AM

Why bother even waking up in the morning if this is all you can contribute to a conversation (virtual or real). though mine is not much better, at least it is informing you that just because you have the ability to use a computer, it doesn't mean you should


Isn't that a little extreme?

I haven't heard any stories of law students committing suicide.  Though I'm sure it's happened!

Suicide?
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: NoelleMyBelle on May 03, 2005, 02:52:37 PM
More keeping people in check?  You're gonna be an awesome parent one day!! :)
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: finko on May 06, 2005, 12:43:26 PM
sorry darling, I am so bored at work I am reduced to reading a message board I don't even like, and then ridculing people for posting on it.

Seriously though, some people on here are just so naive that it really hurts mean not to put them down. And it is not cause I hate them or anything, it's just I feel so sorry for them that I think if I make them exam their lives even a little bit I will have done something good. I mean read some of this chick Mary's post, she is so good awfully ignorant I really wish I could help her in some way. I mean saying things like "what is stupider than drugs," seriously, who says *&^% like that?

I think I will be a great parent. I will handle it the same way I mange all my employees, through sarcasm, ridicule and shame.  :-*
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: rapunzel on May 06, 2005, 08:23:30 PM
Until your children are driven to despair and commit ritual suicide? 
If the fun you were poking was at least witty, fine.  But it just comes off as if you think you are superior, but you haven't shown me anything to make me agree.  At least be amusing if you must be condescending.
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: Mary on May 10, 2005, 01:14:45 PM
Wow, I'm glad you're not my parent! :-\

sorry darling, I am so bored at work I am reduced to reading a message board I don't even like, and then ridculing people for posting on it.

Seriously though, some people on here are just so naive that it really hurts mean not to put them down. And it is not cause I hate them or anything, it's just I feel so sorry for them that I think if I make them exam their lives even a little bit I will have done something good. I mean read some of this chick Mary's post, she is so good awfully ignorant I really wish I could help her in some way. I mean saying things like "what is stupider than drugs," seriously, who says *&^% like that?

I think I will be a great parent. I will handle it the same way I mange all my employees, through sarcasm, ridicule and shame.  :-*
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: SavoyTruffle on May 16, 2005, 09:06:32 PM
Oh, I don't know anyone who had, I just thought it would be more stupid than drug use.  And yes, I agree that drug use is like a really slow suicide.  Or sometimes fast, depending on the circumstances. 

Drugs are bad. I'd never do drugs.  (Does anyone remember "Penny" from when we were little...Saturday morning cartoons...she had a hamster?)

So you don't drink alcohol?  Alcohol is a far more physically and socially dehabilitating drug than marijuana.
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: NoelleMyBelle on May 17, 2005, 11:05:47 AM
Nope. :)
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: SavoyTruffle on May 17, 2005, 02:46:16 PM
Nope. :)

Too bad, a glass of wine a day is good for you.  Far healthier than a lot of the additives in your food, anyway.
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: NoelleMyBelle on May 18, 2005, 04:48:15 PM
Alcohol is also expensive and high in calories. And wine tastes bad.
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: rezipsa on May 18, 2005, 05:34:13 PM
Alcohol is also expensive and high in calories. And wine tastes bad.
Expensive...Alcohol is worth it. 
High in calories...that's why we work out.
Wine taste...that's why I drink TnTs or raz. vodka and tonic.

Anyone need a drink?
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: rezipsa on May 19, 2005, 10:56:16 AM
And wine tastes bad.

Either you've destroyed your palate with cheap beer and bad mixed drinks, or you've never tried a decent glass of wine.  Yes, you do need to develop a taste for it, but that's true for almost all alcohol.
Don't get me wrong, I'll drink a nice glass of wine with dinner, relaxing or trying to read cases.  But I prefer mixed drinks.
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: NoelleMyBelle on May 20, 2005, 10:04:45 AM
I don't like anything that I have to "develop a taste for"--there are enough things to spend money on and add calories to my diet that  I like naturally (like chocolate!!).  Why add more?

Coffee, wine, caviar...blech. Developing a taste is a waste of time.  :)
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: Danielle on May 22, 2005, 09:34:07 PM
Yes, wine has real snob appeal for those who do develop their palate and knowledge of wine tasting.  Right, Jacy?
Title: The Legal Profession's Hidden Secret: Substance Abuse
Post by: maney on June 23, 2005, 07:34:37 PM
Some people do drugs, which is the stupidest thing one can do.

People go to law school believing that they are there for the sole purpose of learning the skills necessary to become lawyers. In addition to this obvious agenda, law students are also exposed to a hidden agenda; to start the process of becoming acculturated to the norms and standards of the legal profession. This legal culture, which law students hope to join, will make rigorous demands upon them. They will be required to use analytical skills in disregard to their emotional reactions, advocate positions that may clash with personal beliefs, and place client’s interests above societal interests. Some lawyers will pay a personal price in emotional terms for engaging in this difficult and complex role of being a lawyer. Law students need to be exposed to and better understand not only the professional pressures they will face after graduation, but also how these pressures can impact their personal lives. One such potential pressure that places law students at great future risk is alcohol or drug abuse.

If the only concern in understanding drug and alcohol abuse among lawyers was the destructive impact on their personal welfare, the issue would be one of great importance. However, the concern becomes even more significant when it is acknowledged that for every lawyer who struggles with addiction issues, the interests of many clients who have reposed trust in their lawyer are endangered. Research clearly establishes that lawyers are at greater risk for alcohol and drug problems than the general population. "Few professions and academic pursuits are as demanding and stressful as the practice of law or studying to become a lawyer."

Research further demonstrates that law students tend to increase their use of alcohol and drugs during their law school careers. Law schools cannot ignore the realities of this research. Law students and lawyers need to receive further education and information about the problem and consequences of alcohol and drug abuse. The lack of interest by legal educators and among members of the Bar may be a factor as to why it has been estimated that a high percentage of disciplined lawyers suffer from addiction issues. From time to time, a brave lawyer will come forward and write about how drug and alcohol abuse negatively impacted her or his personal and professional life.5 Since lawyers are generally concerned about their reputation, some lawyers will only disclose this type of personal account anonymously. The value of storytelling is that the reader can learn through the personal struggles of another lawyer that a better life can exist if the addicted lawyer seeks help. The Lawyers and Judges Assistance Program of the State Bar of Michigan offers assistance and encouragement to lawyers who suffer from chemical dependency problems. Recent statistics indicate that the number of lawyers seeking such help has dramatically increased.

With support from the Oakland County Bar Foundation, I have produced a 33-minute video documentary to help raise the level of awareness regarding chemical addiction among law students and lawyers. It is my intention to provide every accredited law school in the United States with a copy of this program so that it can be aired and discussed in a Professional Responsibility course. Legal educators owe law students the obligation of providing useful information about drug and alcohol abuse. This video program opens and closes with people who have expertise in the area of chemical dependency within the legal profession. John Berry, Executive Director of the State Bar of Michigan, who also chairs the Professionalism Committee of the American Bar Association, conveys the damage that an addicted lawyer can cause to the lawyer’s own life as well as the lives of clients. Robert Edick, Deputy Grievance Administrator, Michigan Attorney Grievance Commission, speaks to how the disciplinary system can assist some addicted lawyers in seeking treatment rather than suffering the normal consequences of discipline. Psychologist Bill Livingston, Director of the Lawyers and Judges Assistance Program, discusses the unique problems faced by lawyers that causes the high incidence of alcohol and drug abuse among lawyers.

The most compelling portion of the video consists of conversations with four Michigan lawyers who are successfully recovering from drug and alcohol addictions. Each lawyer has a unique and personal story to tell.

Steve, in his early 50s, was suspended for three years from the practice of law for misusing client trust funds. His real problem was severe drug and alcohol addiction. Approaching death and having lost everything that meant anything to him in his life, including his family, law license, and assets, Steve sought help and has been drug free over the past decade. During that time, he has been reinstated as a lawyer and has gained the respect of lawyers and judges throughout Michigan for his zealous desire to help other lawyers who suffer from substance abuse.

Roger, in his early sixties, has been in practice for over 30 years and has never been disciplined. However, he almost died as a result of alcohol addiction that did not occur until he was almost 40 years old. He has not consumed any alcohol since he came out of a coma induced by his alcohol consumption 14 years ago.

David, in his mid-30s, currently practices law with a large corporate law firm. He is a transactional and litigation lawyer. Drunk driving charges brought him within the disciplinary system. Although he has not been disciplined, he articulates the impact that his battle against the use of drugs and alcohol has had on his personal and professional life.

Catherine, a lawyer for the past five years, had her alcohol problem accelerate while a law school student. She has been plagued by a drinking problem throughout her adult life. A grievance was filed against her when she came to court appearing to be under the influence of alcohol. She received probation and retained her right to practice law upon her willingness to submit to various conditions including constant drug testing. She has been successful in her recovery and her life has dramatically improved.

One can only have great respect and admiration for the recovering lawyers who agreed to tell their stories so that law students and lawyers could become more conscious of the danger signals presented by drug and alcohol use and abuse and the help that is available to those in need. These lawyers have become positive role models for all lawyers who are willing to confront their issues with chemical dependency. Although the program is not designed to solve the problem of substance abuse among members of the legal profession, hopefully it will provide the start for a discussion about a subject that has been kept under wraps for too long.

http://www.michbar.org/journal/pdf/pdf4article745.pdf
Title: Re: The Legal Profession's Hidden Secret: Substance Abuse
Post by: Mary on June 24, 2005, 05:13:52 PM
Uh, ok. :-\

Some people do drugs, which is the stupidest thing one can do.

People go to law school believing that they are there for the sole purpose of learning the skills necessary to become lawyers. In addition to this obvious agenda, law students are also exposed to a hidden agenda; to start the process of becoming acculturated to the norms and standards of the legal profession. This legal culture, which law students hope to join, will make rigorous demands upon them. They will be required to use analytical skills in disregard to their emotional reactions, advocate positions that may clash with personal beliefs, and place client’s interests above societal interests. Some lawyers will pay a personal price in emotional terms for engaging in this difficult and complex role of being a lawyer. Law students need to be exposed to and better understand not only the professional pressures they will face after graduation, but also how these pressures can impact their personal lives. One such potential pressure that places law students at great future risk is alcohol or drug abuse.

If the only concern in understanding drug and alcohol abuse among lawyers was the destructive impact on their personal welfare, the issue would be one of great importance. However, the concern becomes even more significant when it is acknowledged that for every lawyer who struggles with addiction issues, the interests of many clients who have reposed trust in their lawyer are endangered. Research clearly establishes that lawyers are at greater risk for alcohol and drug problems than the general population. "Few professions and academic pursuits are as demanding and stressful as the practice of law or studying to become a lawyer."

Research further demonstrates that law students tend to increase their use of alcohol and drugs during their law school careers. Law schools cannot ignore the realities of this research. Law students and lawyers need to receive further education and information about the problem and consequences of alcohol and drug abuse. The lack of interest by legal educators and among members of the Bar may be a factor as to why it has been estimated that a high percentage of disciplined lawyers suffer from addiction issues. From time to time, a brave lawyer will come forward and write about how drug and alcohol abuse negatively impacted her or his personal and professional life.5 Since lawyers are generally concerned about their reputation, some lawyers will only disclose this type of personal account anonymously. The value of storytelling is that the reader can learn through the personal struggles of another lawyer that a better life can exist if the addicted lawyer seeks help. The Lawyers and Judges Assistance Program of the State Bar of Michigan offers assistance and encouragement to lawyers who suffer from chemical dependency problems. Recent statistics indicate that the number of lawyers seeking such help has dramatically increased.

With support from the Oakland County Bar Foundation, I have produced a 33-minute video documentary to help raise the level of awareness regarding chemical addiction among law students and lawyers. It is my intention to provide every accredited law school in the United States with a copy of this program so that it can be aired and discussed in a Professional Responsibility course. Legal educators owe law students the obligation of providing useful information about drug and alcohol abuse. This video program opens and closes with people who have expertise in the area of chemical dependency within the legal profession. John Berry, Executive Director of the State Bar of Michigan, who also chairs the Professionalism Committee of the American Bar Association, conveys the damage that an addicted lawyer can cause to the lawyer’s own life as well as the lives of clients. Robert Edick, Deputy Grievance Administrator, Michigan Attorney Grievance Commission, speaks to how the disciplinary system can assist some addicted lawyers in seeking treatment rather than suffering the normal consequences of discipline. Psychologist Bill Livingston, Director of the Lawyers and Judges Assistance Program, discusses the unique problems faced by lawyers that causes the high incidence of alcohol and drug abuse among lawyers.

The most compelling portion of the video consists of conversations with four Michigan lawyers who are successfully recovering from drug and alcohol addictions. Each lawyer has a unique and personal story to tell.

Steve, in his early 50s, was suspended for three years from the practice of law for misusing client trust funds. His real problem was severe drug and alcohol addiction. Approaching death and having lost everything that meant anything to him in his life, including his family, law license, and assets, Steve sought help and has been drug free over the past decade. During that time, he has been reinstated as a lawyer and has gained the respect of lawyers and judges throughout Michigan for his zealous desire to help other lawyers who suffer from substance abuse.

Roger, in his early sixties, has been in practice for over 30 years and has never been disciplined. However, he almost died as a result of alcohol addiction that did not occur until he was almost 40 years old. He has not consumed any alcohol since he came out of a coma induced by his alcohol consumption 14 years ago.

David, in his mid-30s, currently practices law with a large corporate law firm. He is a transactional and litigation lawyer. Drunk driving charges brought him within the disciplinary system. Although he has not been disciplined, he articulates the impact that his battle against the use of drugs and alcohol has had on his personal and professional life.

Catherine, a lawyer for the past five years, had her alcohol problem accelerate while a law school student. She has been plagued by a drinking problem throughout her adult life. A grievance was filed against her when she came to court appearing to be under the influence of alcohol. She received probation and retained her right to practice law upon her willingness to submit to various conditions including constant drug testing. She has been successful in her recovery and her life has dramatically improved.

One can only have great respect and admiration for the recovering lawyers who agreed to tell their stories so that law students and lawyers could become more conscious of the danger signals presented by drug and alcohol use and abuse and the help that is available to those in need. These lawyers have become positive role models for all lawyers who are willing to confront their issues with chemical dependency. Although the program is not designed to solve the problem of substance abuse among members of the legal profession, hopefully it will provide the start for a discussion about a subject that has been kept under wraps for too long.

http://www.michbar.org/journal/pdf/pdf4article745.pdf
Title: Substance Abuse Among Lawyers
Post by: pro_se on July 08, 2005, 04:25:10 AM
Incidence: "A study sponsored by the Washington State Bar Association reported that as many as 18% of the lawyers in that state may be alcohol dependent."

"...[A]lcoholism among the male attorneys is likely to be occurring at the same rate in the two states [Washington and Arizona]."

"13% [of lawyers] said they drink 6+ alcoholic beverages a day."

"It is estimated that nationwide there are 50,000 lawyers and judges who are alcoholic."

--> Compared to the General Population:

(i) Alcohol -

"About 95 million Americans drink alcohol in one form or another. About 10-13% of the general population is alcoholic, but estimates for professionals, including lawyers, range from 30 times the average for lay people."

"Some studies...suggest the incidence of chemical dependency in legal professionals might be as much as 50% higher than for the general population."

"18% of the lawyers were problem drinkers. This percentage is almost twice the approximate 10% alcohol abuse and/or dependency prevalence rates estimated for adults in the United States."

"There are statistics estimating that 15% of all lawyers are alcoholic, compared to 10% in the general population, indicating 95,000 alcoholic lawyers."

(ii) Cocaine -

Less than 1% of attorneys have abused cocaine. The national average of cocaine abuse is 3% of the adult population. "On the other hand, 26% of our sample [all lawyers] have used cocaine at some point in their lives, compared to 12% for the general population."

c) "Addiction is a progressive disease that takes time to develop:"

"Self-concern about recent alcohol use among Arizona subjects significantly increased during the course of law school and the early career years (pre-law-8%, first year-15%, third year 24%, and alumni 26%)"

"While approximately 18% of the lawyers who practiced 2-20 years had developed problem drinking, 25% of those lawyers who practiced 20 years or more were problem drinkers."

Lawyers and Depression

"They tend to be more troubled than other professionals by severe depression and drug and alcohol abuse, studies say. 11% of lawyers polled in North Carolina in 1991 admitted they consider taking their lives once a month."

"10% of the occupations: typist (n = 112), lawyer (n = 178), and other teachers and counselors (pre-kindergarten and special education teachers, education and vocational counselors) (n = 98) meet the criteria for DIS/DSM-III major depressive disorder. These occupations have decidedly higher levels of depression than the 3%-5% found by the ECA among the general population."

"One fifth of both states' [Washington and Arizona] young lawyers developed depression levels that exceeded two standard deviations above the normal population mean."

"Compared with the 3-9% of individuals in Western industrialized countries who suffer from depression, 19% of the Washington lawyers suffered from statistically significant elevated levels of depression. Of these individuals, most were experiencing suicidal ideation."

Law Students

a) Substance Abuse:

"The Committee's survey of American law school students indicates that, within the past 30 days, 81.7% of students have used alcohol, 8.2% have used marijuana, and 8% have used some other illicit drug. Scientific research has demonstrated that the '30 day test' is a valid predictor of regular use."

"Self-concern about recent alcohol use among Arizona subjects significantly increased during the course of law school and the early career years (pre-law-8%, first year-15%, third year 24%, and alumni 26%)". 

b) Depression:

"One tenth of the pre-law students were depressed before they matriculated. As previously reported, this finding approximates the level of depression found among Western industrialized populations." "Thereafter, depression far exceeded that norm. Whereas only 3-9% of individuals in Western industrialized countries suffer from depression, by late spring of the first year of law school, 32% of the students were depressed." "The percentage increased again by late spring of the 3d year when 40% of the class reported significantly elevated depression levels. Two years after law school, 17% of the same subjects were still reporting that they were depressed. Thus, for the limited samples studied, law students and lawyers suffered from depression at a rate twice to four times what would be expected in the general population."
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: jewelbomb on July 08, 2005, 08:33:44 PM
Really, drugs ARE suicide . . . in a way

Not that I'm an addict or anything but jesus, are most people in LS this square? Really though, not that I would suggest using drugs to "cope" with things, but "drugs" (whatever that even means-caffeine, beer, prozac, crank, smack...they certainly aren't the same things) are no more suicide than eating poorly, not exercising, or a host of other "unhealthy" things most people do all the time.
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: leo1 on July 10, 2005, 04:00:43 PM
Really, drugs ARE suicide . . . in a way

Not that I'm an addict or anything but jesus, are most people in LS this square? Really though, not that I would suggest using drugs to "cope" with things, but "drugs" (whatever that even means-caffeine, beer, prozac, crank, smack...they certainly aren't the same things) are no more suicide than eating poorly, not exercising, or a host of other "unhealthy" things most people do all the time.

i was wondering the same thing. and no, most law students at my law school aren't this square. there's just as much drinking and drug use as at any college...
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: Burning Sands on July 11, 2005, 08:38:13 AM
When I came to my first official law school event hosted by the faculty, and I saw alcohol openly available in the law school...I knew it was gonna be a long year.
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: Noelle on July 13, 2005, 01:54:11 PM
Jesus Christ, are all lawyers dopes?
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: labamba on July 17, 2005, 09:52:48 PM
Quote
there's just as much drinking and drug use as at any college...

At my school it's much worse (or better, depending on your point of view!) Within their cliques students do a hell of a lot of drugs I've heard - they exchange with each-other every drug you can think of, from Adderall to cocaine to weed
Title: .
Post by: )( on August 08, 2005, 03:44:54 AM
Substance abuse among lawyers is a terrible problem. Studies indicate that the alcoholism rate among lawyers may be twice that of the general population — perhaps 20% of the total number of lawyers. It is unknown whether this high incidence rate results from the extreme stress of practicing law, or because the same personality traits predispose one to law practice and substance abuse. Nobody knows the extent of cocaine abuse among lawyers, but it too is undoubtedly substantial and devastating.

Substance abuse inevitably results in impaired performance — at least poor judgment, incompetence and neglect of client affairs, sometimes fraud and theft from clients. 50 - 70% of the disciplinary cases brought before state bar ethics panels result at least in part from alcohol or drug abuse. A great many malpractice cases also have their roots in substance abuse.

Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: _/ on August 16, 2005, 04:24:04 AM
Quote
there's just as much drinking and drug use as at any college...

At my school it's much worse (or better, depending on your point of view!) Within their cliques students do a hell of a lot of drugs I've heard - they exchange with each-other every drug you can think of, from Adderall to cocaine to weed

Not all the time! At my school it's mostly during exams' time that many law students go crazy with drugs, not eating, not exercising, studying for 8-10 straight hours!
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: il Principe on August 16, 2005, 12:25:27 PM
Do I really want to flush all this $ down the drain?

Bingo.  That motivates me as well.  Do I really want to flush all this TIME down the drain?  works wonders too.
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: katrina on September 02, 2005, 03:00:28 PM
Quote
studying for 8-10 straight hours!

8-10 straight hours my ass!
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: istically on September 06, 2005, 04:33:25 PM
4-5 hours a day should be enough for the exams study period. If you need more time than that, you're just slow.
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: nesty on September 30, 2005, 01:51:41 PM
I've heard about a lawyer who fell into a 4 month binge with cocaine after which he had an eye opener. One day he felt a little hole on the inside of his nostril against the septum. It seemed like a layer of skin had deteriorated. He didn't feel it was a deep hole, but more like a skin had deteriorated and left the cartilidge bare. This was enough of a scare for him to completely stop his use of coke. Now, was there a skin that would grow over the hole or was it bare cartlidge naturally there and he caused damage directly to his septum's cartlidge? LOL

He was like that if skin would grow back, he would have been lucky and needed to use this as an opportunity to straighten his act. He knew cartlidge did not grow back, but was there a skin that grows back over? I didn't believe that he caused damage to the cartlidge itself. LOL
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: chlorineblitch on November 08, 2005, 11:29:02 AM
{...} cartlidge {...}

It's *cartilage*, not cartlidge!
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: emarejay on November 08, 2005, 04:30:37 PM
hahah

My xanax intake has probably doubled, coffee tripled, alcohol doubled, benadryl to sleep ten times, excercise tripled.

f**ck law school.
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: PSUDSL08 on November 09, 2005, 12:39:00 PM
hahah

My xanax intake has probably doubled, coffee tripled, alcohol doubled, benadryl to sleep ten times, excercise tripled.

f**ck law school.

Xanax intake has probably doubled as well...especially when my mind is racing and I can't sleep, exercise has doubled, coffee has doubled...alcohol down about 98%, I dont get sh*t done if I'm hungover, lost 10 pounds
Title: Here it is a good one on the issue
Post by: law professor on November 23, 2005, 08:36:49 PM
Ritalin is a drug that is widely abused by law students.

You probably have read news stories over the last few years about Ritalin and its ability to improve academic performance, even among students who do not have any learning disabilities like attention deficit disorder. You might also have read about how these non-learning disabled students are increasingly using Ritalin to improve their academic performance in school, including in law school. The controversial and somewhat provocative question that I want to pose is whether law schools should randomly test students for Ritalin use and take action against those students who test positive and don't have a prescription.

In support of the idea, one could argue that Ritalin taken without a prescription is illegal. Schools, particularly law schools, should be concerned if their students are breaking the law. Second, and more importantly, if students who illegally take Ritalin get an academic advantage over non-Ritalin takers, the law breakers are getting an unfair bump up in terms of law school grades and career options.

Moreover, the existence of illicit Ritalin use puts pressure on non-Ritalin takers to use the drug, either through an illegal purchase or by faking symptoms to a physician to get a prescription.  Because Ritalin can have adverse side effects in some people and has unclear long term health consequences, unnecessary Ritalin use is not recommended. In short, to avoid unfairness and to discourage unnecessary Ritalin use, it seems reasonable to randomly test law students for Ritalin and the related drug, Adderall, and to take action against those students who have used the drug without a prescription.

The situation seems to me to be similar to the one professional sports leagues face.  We know that steroids give athletes an unfair advantage and that steroids are illegal without a prescription. As a result, all major sports now prohibit athletes from taking steroids. Arguably, we should do the same when it comes to Ritalin.

Of course, there are differences. First, Ritalin does have some very therapeutic effects, whereas anabolic steroids are (to my knowledge) much more dangerous and of limited therapeutic value. Also, given the number of students who genuinely need Ritalin, we would be invading their privacy by forcing them to reveal their legal use of the drug in order to be cleared after a positive test. Despite these differences with steroids, there seems to be a strong case for student Ritalin testing, especially given the fairness concern. Another objection is that caffeine and even nicotine can enhance test performance, and we don't ban those drugs. But the key difference is that those drugs are completely legal without a prescription. The problem with drugs like Ritalin is that they are both performance enhancing AND illegal without a prescription. 

In the end, it seems that we have gotten to the point where athletic performance is not the only ability that can be enhanced through illegal drug use. Unfortunately, the rules have not yet caught up to address these changes. Is it time we do something about it? Should we start testing law students for illegal Ritalin and Adderall use? And if so, what should the punishment be for violators? Expulsion? Reprimand with a report to the relevant bar association regarding illegal drug use? I look forward to comments.


Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: eloisa on November 24, 2005, 08:40:30 AM
I don't like the idea of random drug testing, although I don't use Ritalin/Adderall/Strattera and have no intention of trying them.  I see random drug testing as rather invasive, particularly because (as you pointed out) there are legitimate uses for those drugs.

But I do think that students who use those drugs without a prescription during exams are breaking the law to gain an unfair advantage.  As such, perhaps the non-prescribed use of performance-enhancing medications could be included in the list of activities that violate the honor code.  That wouldn't stop all of the pill-popping students, but it would at least send a message that the behavior is verboten. Some students (though I'm sure not too many) probably would abstain from the drugs simply because they're afraid of getting caught.

The question, of course, is whether that would make enough of a difference.  I'm not sure.
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: DC on December 02, 2005, 05:11:20 AM
Blatant coke use happens at law schools school and for the most part it is difficult to catch students on cocaine because it is not an outwardly noticeable thing.
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: portia the beautiful on December 05, 2005, 05:33:14 PM
Blatant coke use happens at law schools school and for the most part it is difficult to catch students on cocaine because it is not an outwardly noticeable thing.

How about wide-eyed, anxious appearance, abnormal dilation of your pupils, nystagmus (involuntary jerking of eyeballs), rapid speech?
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: slacker on December 05, 2005, 08:45:10 PM
How about wide-eyed, anxious appearance, abnormal dilation of your pupils, nystagmus (involuntary jerking of eyeballs), rapid speech?
That just sounds like about 1/2 the students and a noticable percentage of the faculty.

My motivation comes from the knowledge that the loans are building and are going to have to be paid off.
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: Leaf2001br on December 06, 2005, 12:56:29 PM
It also is nearly indistinguishable from the other exam week amphetamine of choice for law students:  Adderall.

On the original topic, personally I find fear to be a fairly effective motivation.  Seems to do the trick!
Title: Re: Here it is a good one on the issue
Post by: Suen2b on December 08, 2005, 04:16:20 PM
Ritalin is a drug that is widely abused by law students.
  *It's possible*

....one could argue that Ritalin taken without a prescription is illegal.
  *Taking drugs without prescription AND medical indication IS illegal, no need to argue this*
 
Schools, particularly law schools, should be concerned if their students are breaking the law.
  *Yap, hard to practice what one doesn't preach*

Second, and more importantly, if students who illegally take Ritalin get an academic advantage over non-Ritalin takers, the law breakers are getting an unfair bump up in terms of law school grades and career options.
  *Well, remember here that there are people with medical need of these drugs, like narcolepy or ADHD. These are things that a health professional has decided is the best way to treat this person's problem, but I see your point.

Moreover, the existence of illicit Ritalin use puts pressure on non-Ritalin takers to use the drug, either through an illegal purchase or by faking symptoms to a physician to get a prescription. 
   **Healthcare personell like physicians are trained to recognize symptoms and see who is malingering or not. A physician that does not do so, is not doing his duties towards his patient. Medication errors kill thousands of patients every year and holding doctors accountable is a serious problem. Whether or not we should punish patients that fake symptoms to get a drug or not, I am against this for two reasons. First of all, it is almost impossible to prove intentions and actual decision to fake an illness, secondly many patients might have underlying problems that subconsciously drive them to fake symptoms. This is not only about Ritalin or not, but other drugs as well, when patient just believes getting a drug might be good and tells doctors what he/she saw in a TV ad.

   
 
 Because Ritalin can have adverse side effects in some people and has unclear long term health consequences, unnecessary Ritalin use is not recommended.
  *Like any other prescribed medications, I think Ritalin is one of the net drugs to become a class-action suit in a few years, as al the children of today on these drugs grow up and start complaining of side effects.*

 In short, to avoid unfairness and to discourage unnecessary Ritalin use, it seems reasonable to randomly test law students for Ritalin and the related drug, Adderall, and to take action against those students who have used the drug without a prescription.
   * I agree, and to take civil action against whoever gave them access to these drugs on false pretenses, should there be no medical reasons for taking them*


The situation seems to me to be similar to the one professional sports leagues face.  We know that steroids give athletes an unfair advantage and that steroids are illegal without a prescription. As a result, all major sports now prohibit athletes from taking steroids. Arguably, we should do the same when it comes to Ritalin.
    **Absolutely,but again; the people providing them with these drugs are really more guilty of breaching their duty as health provider than the person taking it. I agree that peer pressure is a stronger driving force than personal responsibility here. Best solution would be to punish the student disiplinary and take civil action agaist health care provider. *
 
Despite these differences with steroids, there seems to be a strong case for student Ritalin testing, especially given the fairness concern.
           ****I agree, this could be part of a physical offered each student.**
 

  The problem with drugs like Ritalin is that they are both performance enhancing AND illegal without a prescription. 
   ***Excactly, I personally drink at least 10 cups of coffee a day and smokes 1-2 packs also, both of them helping my memory before any test, but everybody can use these drugs and I know it helps me study better**

 Is it time we do something about it? Should we start testing law students for illegal Ritalin and Adderall use? And if so, what should the punishment be for violators? Expulsion? Reprimand with a report to the relevant bar association regarding illegal drug use? I look forward to comments.
      ***I think the main emphasis should be put upon the people that provide them with the drugs. Students are just in a situation where they think soemthing might help them out. As long as they obtained these drugs through a that has guaranteed their medical needs for these drugs, it seems unfair to hold the students.  They were just advised by people paid to take care of their medical needs. it doesn't matter or not if they wanted the drugs or not, since these drugs are prescribed by the physician and nobosy else. He/She therefore has the ultimate responsibility (and liability) when prescribing these.
    We did not prosecute people for taking Vioxx, despite the drug giving them heart attacks.

 :D

Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: primadonna greta garbo on December 08, 2005, 11:14:34 PM
It also is nearly indistinguishable from the other exam week amphetamine of choice for law students:  Adderall.


LOL Leaf! ;)
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: 12 on December 11, 2005, 03:22:55 AM
Quote
My motivation comes from the knowledge that the loans are building and are going to have to be paid off

Exactly! It is that knowledge that is motivating you to do drugs and much more!
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: slacker on December 11, 2005, 02:06:12 PM
I'm asuming when you say "motivating you to do drugs..." that you mean 'you' in a general sense and not for me specifically (since you're replying to my quote).
Title: More students abusing hyperactivity drugs
Post by: lawher on December 11, 2005, 06:39:05 PM
It also is nearly indistinguishable from the other exam week amphetamine of choice for law students:  Adderall.

By Andrew Conte
TRIBUNE-REVIEW
Monday, October 25, 2004

Jamie Cafeo could not understand at first why other students wanted the prescription drugs she needed to focus in classes at Community College of Allegheny County. Classmates offered her $50 for her bottle of Adderall, a stimulant prescribed to people with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. "There are a lot of friends questioning me if I'll sell it to them," said Cafeo, 20, of Bloomfield. "They can take it and write an entire paper without anything bothering them." With midterm examinations under way, drugs such as Ritalin and Adderall are the new crutch for kids who cram. That's because the drugs can give healthy people an almost super-human ability to focus for long periods, said Dr. Eric Heiligenstein, a psychiatrist at the University of Wisconsin who studies substance abuse.

The drugs also have unintended recreational uses. Crushed and snorted, they give a rush similar to cocaine, said Dr. Neil Capretto, medical director at Gateway Rehabilitation Center. "It's a double-edged sword," Capretto said. "It's become a popular drug of abuse among kids." Adderall, in particular, has emerged as the drug-of-the-moment, students and health experts said. "It's a huge asset if someone wants to spend 12 hours studying without fatigue," Heiligenstein said. "It's an academic steroid." Adderall is one of several drugs that calm attention deficit disorder patients by stimulating their brains. The drugs activate the frontal lobes of the brain, an area that monitors task performance, Heiligenstein said.

Shire Pharmaceuticals Group, a British company with its American headquarters near Philadelphia, manufactures and sells Adderall and Adderall XR, an extended-release version of the drug. Company officials declined to comment for this story. In a statement, the company warned that prescription drugs should be used only as intended and only under medical supervision. Sales of Adderall XR grew by 30 percent to $283 million for the first six months of the year, the company reports. Shire expects the market to keep growing, citing a 1999 federal study that shows that while 8.2 million American adults have attention deficit disorder, only 360,000 receive treatment.

Emotional, physical strains

For normal, healthy people who do not have diagnosed attention deficit problems, Adderall can cause emotional and physical strains by making them hyperactive, paranoid and delusional while putting them at risk for heart attacks or strokes, Capretto said. It also can cause non-prescribed users to crash into exhaustion as the drug wears off, he said. Because of that, people who abuse the drug can get addicted to the energy it gives them. Regular users will then seek stronger doses to maintain the high. Because young people often binge on the drugs, crushing them and snorting them to get an immediate rush, they run the risk of overdosing, Capretto said. The results of an overdose can vary by person. It can be fatal in extreme cases. "If you're tired, have a cup of coffee or tea," Capretto said he tells students. "(Adderall) shouldn't be thought of as a cup of coffee or Coca-Cola for energy."
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: lawher on December 11, 2005, 06:41:13 PM
Getting the drugs

Cafeo, a junior, wonders how many older students getting prescriptions for the first time really need them. She said she has fended off too many fellow students wanting her drugs and then faking the attention deficit symptoms. One friend started taking Adderall without a prescription and quickly ramped up to taking an entire month's worth of pills in about 10 days. When the friend could no longer find reliable sources for that much Adderall, she convinced a doctor to write her a prescription. "All you have to do is read a book on ADHD and you know what to tell a doctor," Cafeo said. "Now a lot of kids get it by saying they have a problem studying." Students who have tried the drug illegally will come in seeking prescriptions for it, said James A. Cox, director of the University of Pittsburgh counseling center. He typically refers them first to the Academic Support Center for help with time management skills and study strategies. Attention deficit disorder is generally associated with childhood, but some students don't realize they have problems until they reach college, said Anita Barkin, director of Student Health Services at Carnegie Mellon University. Living on campus and faced with more intense academic pressures, some students find they cannot control their environment enough to compensate for their lack of focus.

Tracking use

Few experts are tracking misuse of Adderall. The federal Drug Abuse Warning Network has seen an increase in emergency room visits involving dextroamphetamine, a main ingredient in Adderall, said Leah Young, spokeswoman for the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. But the numbers, she warns, are too small to mean much to researchers. Hospitals often lump dextroamphetamine with other amphetamines and methamphetamines. Despite those limitations, the numbers of emergency room visits related to dextroamphetamine rose nationally to 1,355 in 2002 from 635 in 2000 and just 261 in 1999.

In all, there were 670,000 drug-related emergency room visits in 2002. Allegheny General Hospital, on the North Side, has treated two people in the past year for adverse reactions to attention deficit disorder drugs, said Dr. Fred Harchelroad, chairman of emergency medicine. Both patients came in with a rapid heart beat and an increased sense of anxiety. "They had gotten (the drugs) from friends who might have been a little more well-versed in using them," Harchelroad said. "They took one or two more than they should have."

Officials at Carnegie Mellon University, the University of Pittsburgh, Duquesne University, Carlow College and Point Park University said they are aware of the potential abuse of Adderall. But no local college reported any overdoses. "Adderall and Ritalin are getting to be drugs of choice for students who believe they will enhance their performance on tests or help them study more effectively," said Barkin at Carnegie Mellon University. The school does not have any "hard or fast evidence" about students abusing the drugs, she said, but has heard enough rumors and anecdotal reports to know it's taking place. The university is conducting a survey of students' use of Adderall, Ritalin and other prescription stimulants, Barkin said.

Some students at the University of Pittsburgh said they know of people who use Adderall in crunch times. The university, like many others, conducts anonymous surveys about whether students are abusing alcohol and drugs. It declined to provide the results. "We're not seeing it as an issue on this campus," said Marcee Radakovich, director of Student Health Services.

Trying stimulants

A survey of students at the University of Wisconsin's Madison campus found 20 percent of the students with Adderall prescriptions had abused the drug, shared it with friends or sold it, Heiligenstein said. A quarter of college-age students, meanwhile, have tried stimulants such as Ritalin or Adderall without prescriptions, said Dr. Tim Wilens, a psychopharmacologist at Massachusetts General Hospital. Wilens recently finished a research paper that cites a survey of undergraduates at Bates College in Lewiston, Maine, finding that 4 percent had abused amphetamine compounds, 7 percent Ritalin and 24 percent both.

The federal government does not survey students on Adderall abuse, but has followed non-prescription use of Ritalin by high school and college students in recent years. Nearly 5 percent of college students in 2003 said they had tried Ritalin without prescriptions in the previous 12 months, according to the annual, federally financed Monitoring the Future study conducted by the University of Michigan. Abuse among college students was nearly twice that of non-students of the same age.

Younger users

There's also anecdotal evidence of Adderall abuse starting at a younger age. Bethel Park police arrested eight high school freshmen and a sophomore in February for trading Adderall and two other prescription drugs. A teacher caught one of the students snorting a crushed pill in a school bathroom, said Jim Modrak, a school resource police officer. Students are not supposed to carry even their own aspirin on campus, Modrak said, but the ADHD drugs are so prevalent it's hard to keep them out of the wrong hands. "With students having a legitimate access to this medication, there is going to be plenty of opportunity for misuse and possible illegal use of the medication," Modrak said. On college campuses where students typically maintain their own prescriptions, it can be difficult to uncover abuse, experts said. "It's virtually impossible to police that," the University of Wisconsin's Heiligenstein said. "As with other prescription medicines, you don't have to go to a seedy part of town to buy it."

ADHD drugs

Who's abusing attention deficit hyperactivity disorder drugs? A quarter of college-age students have tried stimulants such as Ritalin or Adderall without prescriptions, said Dr. Tim Wilens, a psychopharmacologist at Massachusetts General Hospital. Four percent of college students have tried amphetamine compounds, 7 percent Ritalin and 24 percent both types in a survey of undergraduates at Bates College in Lewiston, Maine. A fifth of the students prescribed Adderall abused the drug, shared it with friends or sold it, according to a survey of students at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Nearly 5 percent of college students in 2003 said they had tried Ritalin without prescriptions in the previous 12 months, according to the annual, federally financed Monitoring the Future study conducted by the University of Michigan. Abuse among college students was nearly twice that of nonstudents of the same age.

Andrew Conte can be reached at aconte@tribweb.com or (412) 765-2312.
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: dft on December 13, 2005, 10:32:38 AM
funny stuff

How about wide-eyed, anxious appearance, abnormal dilation of your pupils, nystagmus (involuntary jerking of eyeballs), rapid speech?
That just sounds like about 1/2 the students and a noticable percentage of the faculty.

My motivation comes from the knowledge that the loans are building and are going to have to be paid off.
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: dft on December 13, 2005, 11:16:06 AM
Cocaine is not technically an amphetamine (it has some narcotic properties as well), but it's close enough.

They are both stimulants though -- that would be the more accurate term.

It also is nearly indistinguishable from the other exam week amphetamine of choice for law students:  Adderall.

On the original topic, personally I find fear to be a fairly effective motivation.  Seems to do the trick!
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: cherry coke on December 15, 2005, 04:40:15 AM

How about wide-eyed, anxious appearance, abnormal dilation of your pupils, nystagmus (involuntary jerking of eyeballs), rapid speech?
That just sounds like about 1/2 the students and a noticable percentage of the faculty.

My motivation comes from the knowledge that the loans are building and are going to have to be paid off.

funny stuff


Which one? or both of them?
Title: Re: More students abusing hyperactivity drugs
Post by: Suen2b on December 15, 2005, 07:14:09 PM
It also is nearly indistinguishable from the other exam week amphetamine of choice for law students:  Adderall.

By Andrew Conte
TRIBUNE-REVIEW
Monday, October 25, 2004

Jamie Cafeo could not understand at first why other students wanted the prescription drugs she needed to focus in classes at Community College of Allegheny County. Classmates offered her $50 for her bottle of Adderall, a stimulant prescribed to people with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. "There are a lot of friends questioning me if I'll sell it to them," said Cafeo, 20, of Bloomfield.

 hehe, I am sure she is "surprised". LOL

     20 years and so out of touch. I don't think so. Adderall surely helps with studying, but I prefer loads of coffee to taking it. For once, it is cheaper and you never know what situation you might end up in that might warrant drug test. Only good thing with Adderall is that it doesn't stay in system long compared to Marijuana for example (not that THAT is a great study-aid).
         I prefer my Colombian coffee.



   
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: burningpeach on December 17, 2005, 05:50:11 AM
It also is nearly indistinguishable from the other exam week amphetamine of choice for law students:  Adderall.

By Andrew Conte
TRIBUNE-REVIEW
Monday, October 25, 2004

Jamie Cafeo could not understand at first why other students wanted the prescription drugs she needed to focus in classes at Community College of Allegheny County. Classmates offered her $50 for her bottle of Adderall, a stimulant prescribed to people with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. "There are a lot of friends questioning me if I'll sell it to them," said Cafeo, 20, of Bloomfield.

hehe, I am sure she is "surprised". LOL

20 years and so out of touch. I don't think so. Adderall surely helps with studying, but I prefer loads of coffee to taking it. For once, it is cheaper and you never know what situation you might end up in that might warrant drug test. Only good thing with Adderall is that it doesn't stay in system long compared to Marijuana for example (not that THAT is a great study-aid).

I prefer my Colombian coffee.

I don't think the Colombian thing is a good idea. I mean, emotional liberation, breakdown of communication barriers, increased feelings of self worth, elimination of the need for sleep and lack of appetite granted, what about the heightened risk of cerebral hemorrhages (stokes), heart and circulatory failure and paranoid psychoses?
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: slacker on December 17, 2005, 08:17:59 AM
I don't think the Colombian thing is a good idea. I mean, emotional liberation, breakdown of communication barriers, increased feelings of self worth, elimination of the need for sleep and lack of appetite granted, what about the heightened risk of cerebral hemorrhages (stokes), heart and circulatory failure and paranoid psychoses?
I believe it depends on which major Columbian export you stick with. Like Suen2b, coffee is my drug of choice. Not all Columbian, though....some blends include beans from Africa/Asia, also.
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: IQT on December 20, 2005, 01:45:27 AM
Quote
Not all Columbian, though....some blends include beans from Africa/Asia, also.

Those blends aren't that useful for the exam day, thou. I mean, once the initial fun has passed there can be a feeling of heaviness, as though your bones have melted down into your feet. You don't want to feel as if nothing matters when taking your exam, do you?!
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: bjrobinson on December 21, 2005, 05:03:56 AM
Blatant coke use happens at law schools school and for the most part it is difficult to catch students on cocaine because it is not an outwardly noticeable thing.

How about wide-eyed, anxious appearance, abnormal dilation of your pupils, nystagmus (involuntary jerking of eyeballs), rapid speech?

(http://z.about.com/d/politicalhumor/1/0/1/J/bush_gotcoke.jpg)
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: nomine365 on December 22, 2005, 06:05:16 AM
Blatant coke use happens at law schools school and for the most part it is difficult to catch students on cocaine because it is not an outwardly noticeable thing.

How about wide-eyed, anxious appearance, abnormal dilation of your pupils, nystagmus (involuntary jerking of eyeballs), rapid speech?

(http://z.about.com/d/politicalhumor/1/0/1/J/bush_gotcoke.jpg)

(http://cocaine.org/cocaineadvert.gif)
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: babybear on December 25, 2005, 08:11:37 AM
Ha! You guys are so funny!
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: erstes on February 18, 2006, 11:25:12 AM
Indeed, I mean, this ad, this cocaine ad is really funny! LOL
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: Bravo on March 18, 2006, 05:02:25 AM

(http://cocaine.org/cocaineadvert.gif)


The chances are that most of us will live to see drugs prohibition replaced with a system of regulation and control. By 2020 the criminal market will have been forced to relinquish its control of the drug trade and government regulation will be the norm.

Users will no longer "score" from unregulated dealers.

Instead, they will buy their drugs from specialist pharmacists or licensed retailers. At its simplest, this is all legalisation, control and regulation will mean - shopping and visiting the doctor. It is simply a question of transferring the policy paradigm of management to currently illegal drugs.

One of the problems for those wanting to dramatise a world where currently illegal drugs are legal is the distinct lack of drama involved. Drug prohibition, in collision with vast numbers of users, creates a situation where drama underlies the entire business. By abrogating responsibility for the trade through the failure to prohibit it, the market is gifted to organised criminals and unregulated dealers. The consequent deregulation of the market at the international level spawns violence, corruption and political and economic destabilisation - witness Afghanistan, Latin America, the Caribbean and south east Asia. At a national level, our prisons are twice as full as they would be without prohibition, property crime is doubled. Your taxes - that the government spends on prohibition - actively make your environment a worse place in which to live. And you are being duped into supporting a policy that makes drugs more dangerous and more chaotic.

At a community level prohibition-related street prostitution is endemic, street dealing and turf wars are the norm in larger cities, and prohibition is responsible for more than half of all burglaries, shoplifting, thefts from vehicles and robberies. Drugs and their misuse are not responsible for this mayhem and misery. Prohibition is. (Note that there is no property crime related to fundraising to support a tobacco habit, even though users require up to 60 hits a day and tobacco withdrawal and abstinence are difficult to deal with). With regard to tobacco, gambling and drinking, prohibition doesn't work. A useful question to ask is: what are the successful commodity prohibitions of the last hundred years? If you are struggling to remember any successful prohibitions, it may be because there are none.

Politics, not evidence, drives the war on drugs.

You may well ask why we persist with prohibition if there is no evidence that it is effective. In short, the answer is politics - with a very big "p". The war is not fought because it is effective; it is fought because it suits politicians to fight it. US's domestic and foreign policy are now intimately intertwined with prohibition. With regard to domestic policy, prohibition identifies convenient scapegoats and drug-war enemies to rally the electorate around. Many law enforcement agencies have an investment in prohibition. Prison builders, police, customs, CIA, and the FBI are funded to a great extent to fight the war on drugs.

Breaking point?

The drug war is also enormously useful to the US in continuing its adventures in foreign countries in which it has an interest - see Latin America, Afghanistan, the Middle East, south east Asia and the Caribbean. Global prohibition is enforced through the UN (for which read US). It is supported by more than 150 UN member states, many of whom do not wish to fall foul of the US. Prohibition will end when the enormously destructive consequences of its continued enforcement become too much for the system to bear, despite its attractive political benefits. And all the evidence points to the fact that we are approaching that point.

Transform estimates that 15 years maximum is as much more prohibition as we can all stand. When it goes we will wonder why we did not end it earlier, and our trust in our politicians will take yet another dive. We can only hope that it happens sooner rather than later and that we can pass on a less melodramatic drug policy to our children.
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: gettinwarmer on March 27, 2006, 09:26:51 PM
Really, drugs ARE suicide . . . in a way

Not that I'm an addict or anything but jesus, are most people in LS this square? Really though, not that I would suggest using drugs to "cope" with things, but "drugs" (whatever that even means-caffeine, beer, prozac, crank, smack ... they certainly aren't the same things) are no more suicide than eating poorly, not exercising, or a host of other "unhealthy" things most people do all the time.

As you, I am sick of seeing, e.g., heroin and heroin users presented incorrectly in movies and books. The rotting corpse hidden in a motel mattress is a good analogy of society's attempt to hide heroin addicts from public view. The DEA and other agencies exist to spread propaganda meant to keep them hid; they have no interest in stopping drug use because they know as well as everyone else that this is impossible. 
Title: BETWEEN A ROCK AND A HARD PLACE
Post by: hp12c on April 22, 2006, 10:58:16 AM

(http://cocaine.org/cocaineadvert.gif)


Discussing your penis in court doesn’t stay funny for long

(http://www.lacitybeat.com/media/133/babylon_story.gif)

On the morning of his 42nd birthday, Stephen Harrell was arrested outside a liquor store on Century Boulevard in Inglewood, handcuffed, and hauled off to face the screwiest charge ever leveled at him in his admittedly checkered career with the criminal justice system. He was accused of concealing four rocks of cocaine in his foreskin. To be more precise, he was accused of wrapping the rocks in individual clear plastic bags, placing them all in another black bag, shoving them halfway up his penis and then keeping them snugly in place for at least an hour between the time of his arrest and the time that three Inglewood cops strip-searched him. The whole package was variously described by the arresting officer as being "bigger than a marble" and having roughly the same diameter as a dime.

Let me point out to those of you unendowed with male genitalia that we are talking about an almost unfathomable world of pain here, not to mention physical elasticity of a truly extraordinary kind. (Those of you with male genitalia have probably crossed your legs already.) Nothing in Harrell's long resume as a petty criminal and drug user suggests he was ever in serious contention for the cast of Puppetry of the Penis. Or, as Harrell himself put it in one of his first interviews with his defense attorney: "I may be big, but I ain't no horse." So far, just a funny story. But it only gets more bizarre on closer examination. The arresting officer, Patrick Manning, claims he saw Harrell drop a crack pipe from his waistband as soon as he became aware of his patrol car. That, at least, was the pretext for the arrest. But Harrell didn't apparently think of dumping the cocaine – assuming he ever had it in the first place. Officer Manning noticed nothing unusual about the way Harrell was walking, and once he had cuffed him and put him in the patrol car he didn't report any wriggling or gasps of pain.

The public defender eventually assigned to Harrell, Eleanor Schneir, had the bright idea of downloading some penis diagrams off the Internet and asked Officer Manning and the two colleagues he took with him into the strip-search room to show the trial jury where exactly the bulge had been. Curiously, each policeman put it in a different place. One said it was at the top, beneath the foreskin proper, while the other two put it further down and to the side. In one diagram the package was almost all the way to the base of the penis – which makes one wonder just how endowed with male genitalia the police officers themselves can have been. Schneir had great fun buying up gourmet gumballs from her local grocery store and waving them at the jury, with a dime taped to the side for size-comparison purposes, just to emphasize the preposterousness of the allegation. She cited no less an authority than Seinfeld to question whether any penis could withstand the cold of the strip-search room without succumbing to the dreaded male problem of shrinkage, which would surely have shaken the incriminating package loose all by itself.

At a certain point, it seemed Harrell was home free, and Schneir was confident enough to berate the prosecution for subjecting him to an embarrassing public spectacle. As she told the jury: "He has to sit here and hear me, his lawyer, his advocate, a woman, argue to a jury of 12 strangers that his penis is too small for this to be possible – what could possibly be more humiliating than that?" Things took an unexpected turn, however, as a batch of photographs of Harrell's genitalia was released to the court and appeared to show that he was circumcised. From Harrell's point of view, this might have looked like a pretty good defense – how, after all, can anyone conceal drugs in their foreskin if they don't have one? In reality, though, the photographs unleashed a furor in the courtroom and changed the terms of the debate entirely. Suddenly, it was not the Inglewood PD whose honesty was under scrutiny but rather Harrell's, as the defendant was accused of yanking his foreskin back for the camera in an attempt to conceal it.

In the single most surreal sequence of the trial, Officer Manning bragged that he knew all about the flexibility of uncircumcised penises because he used to play baseball for the Atlanta Braves (he was a 1999 draft pick later sidelined by a knee injury) and frequently showered with players from Colombia and Central America who not only had foreskins but were frequently "silly" with them. Manning told the prosecutor he saw players pull down their foreskins and dance around for as long as 20 minutes. Schneir wasn't going to let this one go. "I'm a little confused," she said disingenuously. "I was always led to believe that men in showers go to great lengths not to look at each other's penises, and you're telling me you looked for 20 minutes?"

Members of the jury started guffawing. Manning said sheepishly that he hadn't exactly looked for 20 minutes. So Schneir asked him how long he had looked for – 15 minutes, 10 minutes, 5 minutes? Eventually, Manning said he’d looked at one penis for one minute. Schneir deadpanned: "Okay, we're all dying to know: whose penis was it?" For all the courtroom humor, from here on out the trial started slipping out of the grasp of the defense. The deputy district attorney suggested the only way to resolve the circumcision question was to have Harrell re-examined by a medical professional. Harrell told the court he'd had quite enough people looking at his penis and refused. The judge, Deirdre Hill, then instructed the jury that they were free to interpret this refusal as a form of self-incrimination. Schneir tried valiantly to argue that the circumcision question made no difference to the plausibility of the police's story. But the damage was done, and the jury came back with a guilty verdict.

That, of course, is the way so many petty crime cases go. Given the choice between a defendant of dubious character and the testimony of uniformed police officers, juries will almost always side with the police. The Harrell case reflects many of the uglier aspects of law enforcement in Los Angeles: a poor, black, relatively harmless delinquent picked up, handcuffed and stripped by white officers, and lumbered with a serious felony charge for which he has just been sentenced to six years and six months behind bars. Without the allegation of cocaine in his penis, he would have been looking at a misdemeanor and a $100 fine. There is some evidence to suggest that Officer Manning, for one, finds escapades like the apprehension of Stephen Harrell to be a bit of a hoot. Interviewed by a Myrtle Beach, South Carolina newspaper when he first made the leap from baseball to policing, he said patrolling the streets of Inglewood was not entirely unlike competitive sports. "To me, it's almost like a game," he said. "I’ve had a great time so far."

Judge Hill also appears to have taken Harrell less than seriously. At one point during the sentencing phase, when one of the fingerprints from his conviction record failed to match, she ruled that his priors should be disregarded and that he was therefore eligible for drug treatment under the terms of Proposition 36. When the court next convened, however, she simply reversed herself – for reasons possibly connected to the fact that the district attorney's office was in a separate dispute with her and threatening to have her removed from felony cases — and she ended up imposing the maximum sentence. "She’d already told my client she would release him," a frustrated Schneir said. "That seems to me cruel and unusual punishment on some level." Stephen Harrell is now stuck behind bars until 2010 at the earliest – and it's far from clear who is better off for it.
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: barbras on April 23, 2006, 01:30:54 AM
LOL Funny story!

As to drugs .. Every law student does drugs. Most of them are "legal" prescription kinds. I know so many law students that told me that the only way they survived law school was to do it on drugs. Most law student are hippies anyways, and no-one can prove me wrong.
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: tinaarena on April 23, 2006, 01:38:11 AM
A friend at McGeorge in CA told me that last semester they found a bag of black tar heroin in the student union on the last day of exams. Can't even think what would drive one to such a drug.
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: 980eQ on April 23, 2006, 04:14:54 PM
stick to a hobby you like, keep good positive company, smoke a lot of camels, drink a LOT of redbull, work out, masterbate, go out at least 1 time a month to the poorest area of town and look at the people, remind yourself that you dont want to be there/go back there...

Oh yea, asian threesomes work well
Title: Re: BETWEEN A ROCK AND A HARD PLACE
Post by: lolla on April 23, 2006, 06:59:15 PM


Discussing your penis in court doesn't stay funny for long

(http://www.lacitybeat.com/media/133/babylon_story.gif)

On the morning of his 42nd birthday, Stephen Harrell was arrested outside a liquor store on Century Boulevard in Inglewood, handcuffed, and hauled off to face the screwiest charge ever leveled at him in his admittedly checkered career with the criminal justice system. He was accused of concealing four rocks of cocaine in his foreskin. To be more precise, he was accused of wrapping the rocks in individual clear plastic bags, placing them all in another black bag, shoving them halfway up his penis and then keeping them snugly in place for at least an hour between the time of his arrest and the time that three Inglewood cops strip-searched him. The whole package was variously described by the arresting officer as being "bigger than a marble" and having roughly the same diameter as a dime.

Let me point out to those of you unendowed with male genitalia that we are talking about an almost unfathomable world of pain here, not to mention physical elasticity of a truly extraordinary kind. (Those of you with male genitalia have probably crossed your legs already.) Nothing in Harrell's long resume as a petty criminal and drug user suggests he was ever in serious contention for the cast of Puppetry of the Penis. Or, as Harrell himself put it in one of his first interviews with his defense attorney: "I may be big, but I ain't no horse." So far, just a funny story. But it only gets more bizarre on closer examination. The arresting officer, Patrick Manning, claims he saw Harrell drop a crack pipe from his waistband as soon as he became aware of his patrol car. That, at least, was the pretext for the arrest. But Harrell didn't apparently think of dumping the cocaine – assuming he ever had it in the first place. Officer Manning noticed nothing unusual about the way Harrell was walking, and once he had cuffed him and put him in the patrol car he didn't report any wriggling or gasps of pain.

The public defender eventually assigned to Harrell, Eleanor Schneir, had the bright idea of downloading some penis diagrams off the Internet and asked Officer Manning and the two colleagues he took with him into the strip-search room to show the trial jury where exactly the bulge had been. Curiously, each policeman put it in a different place. One said it was at the top, beneath the foreskin proper, while the other two put it further down and to the side. In one diagram the package was almost all the way to the base of the penis – which makes one wonder just how endowed with male genitalia the police officers themselves can have been. Schneir had great fun buying up gourmet gumballs from her local grocery store and waving them at the jury, with a dime taped to the side for size-comparison purposes, just to emphasize the preposterousness of the allegation. She cited no less an authority than Seinfeld to question whether any penis could withstand the cold of the strip-search room without succumbing to the dreaded male problem of shrinkage, which would surely have shaken the incriminating package loose all by itself.

At a certain point, it seemed Harrell was home free, and Schneir was confident enough to berate the prosecution for subjecting him to an embarrassing public spectacle. As she told the jury: "He has to sit here and hear me, his lawyer, his advocate, a woman, argue to a jury of 12 strangers that his penis is too small for this to be possible – what could possibly be more humiliating than that?" Things took an unexpected turn, however, as a batch of photographs of Harrell's genitalia was released to the court and appeared to show that he was circumcised. From Harrell's point of view, this might have looked like a pretty good defense – how, after all, can anyone conceal drugs in their foreskin if they don't have one? In reality, though, the photographs unleashed a furor in the courtroom and changed the terms of the debate entirely. Suddenly, it was not the Inglewood PD whose honesty was under scrutiny but rather Harrell's, as the defendant was accused of yanking his foreskin back for the camera in an attempt to conceal it.

In the single most surreal sequence of the trial, Officer Manning bragged that he knew all about the flexibility of uncircumcised penises because he used to play baseball for the Atlanta Braves (he was a 1999 draft pick later sidelined by a knee injury) and frequently showered with players from Colombia and Central America who not only had foreskins but were frequently "silly" with them. Manning told the prosecutor he saw players pull down their foreskins and dance around for as long as 20 minutes. Schneir wasn't going to let this one go. "I'm a little confused," she said disingenuously. "I was always led to believe that men in showers go to great lengths not to look at each other's penises, and you're telling me you looked for 20 minutes?"

Members of the jury started guffawing. Manning said sheepishly that he hadn't exactly looked for 20 minutes. So Schneir asked him how long he had looked for – 15 minutes, 10 minutes, 5 minutes? Eventually, Manning said he’d looked at one penis for one minute. Schneir deadpanned: "Okay, we're all dying to know: whose penis was it?" For all the courtroom humor, from here on out the trial started slipping out of the grasp of the defense. The deputy district attorney suggested the only way to resolve the circumcision question was to have Harrell re-examined by a medical professional. Harrell told the court he'd had quite enough people looking at his penis and refused. The judge, Deirdre Hill, then instructed the jury that they were free to interpret this refusal as a form of self-incrimination. Schneir tried valiantly to argue that the circumcision question made no difference to the plausibility of the police's story. But the damage was done, and the jury came back with a guilty verdict.

That, of course, is the way so many petty crime cases go. Given the choice between a defendant of dubious character and the testimony of uniformed police officers, juries will almost always side with the police. The Harrell case reflects many of the uglier aspects of law enforcement in Los Angeles: a poor, black, relatively harmless delinquent picked up, handcuffed and stripped by white officers, and lumbered with a serious felony charge for which he has just been sentenced to six years and six months behind bars. Without the allegation of cocaine in his penis, he would have been looking at a misdemeanor and a $100 fine. There is some evidence to suggest that Officer Manning, for one, finds escapades like the apprehension of Stephen Harrell to be a bit of a hoot. Interviewed by a Myrtle Beach, South Carolina newspaper when he first made the leap from baseball to policing, he said patrolling the streets of Inglewood was not entirely unlike competitive sports. "To me, it's almost like a game," he said. "I’ve had a great time so far."

Judge Hill also appears to have taken Harrell less than seriously. At one point during the sentencing phase, when one of the fingerprints from his conviction record failed to match, she ruled that his priors should be disregarded and that he was therefore eligible for drug treatment under the terms of Proposition 36. When the court next convened, however, she simply reversed herself – for reasons possibly connected to the fact that the district attorney's office was in a separate dispute with her and threatening to have her removed from felony cases — and she ended up imposing the maximum sentence. "She’d already told my client she would release him," a frustrated Schneir said. "That seems to me cruel and unusual punishment on some level." Stephen Harrell is now stuck behind bars until 2010 at the earliest – and it's far from clear who is better off for it.

I've heard about two women hiding drugs in their pussies ... they were very nervous and the Customs officials became suspicious ... stripped-searched the whores ... they got arrested!
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: dft on April 25, 2006, 02:25:12 PM
words of wisdom. truly motivating.

have you considered a career as a motivational speaker?

 ;)

stick to a hobby you like, keep good positive company, smoke a lot of camels, drink a LOT of redbull, work out, masterbate, go out at least 1 time a month to the poorest area of town and look at the people, remind yourself that you dont want to be there/go back there...

Oh yea, asian threesomes work well
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: QUAKER OATS on April 25, 2006, 06:38:49 PM
stick to a hobby you like, keep good positive company, smoke a lot of camels, drink a LOT of redbull, work out, masterbate, go out at least 1 time a month to the poorest area of town and look at the people, remind yourself that you dont want to be there/go back there...

Oh yea, asian threesomes work well


Wanna study together.  It seems we use the same methods
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: Leaf2001br on May 04, 2006, 12:45:00 PM
(http://backitup.pbwiki.com/f/addy.JPG)

(http://backitup.pbwiki.com/f/asiankid.gif)
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: 8 on May 10, 2006, 05:11:05 PM
LOL Funny story!

As to drugs .. Every law student does drugs. Most of them are "legal" prescription kinds. I know so many law students that told me that the only way they survived law school was to do it on drugs. Most law student are hippies anyways, and no-one can prove me wrong.

I wouldn't say "every" law student does drugs ... but a majority of them does!
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: mixinmark on May 12, 2006, 06:32:01 AM
Especially in May and December!
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: vernon on June 21, 2006, 06:44:01 PM

The DEA and other agencies exist to spread propaganda meant to keep them hid; they have no interest in stopping drug use because they know as well as everyone else that this is impossible. 


Just because they cannot put an end to it, it does not mean that they will not try to .. remember Sisyphus? 
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: sity on July 13, 2006, 04:43:50 PM
I thought I would ask the question: How many students here take drugs? And when I say "drugs" I mean amphetamines, marijuana, alcohol abuse, or name your own drug. Seems down right ludicrous the Bar Examiners may be reluctant to admit you to the bar if you have a DUI on your record but you could be a raging coke-head with no record and be admitted.

I hear 50% of students are on amphetamines. They claim it helps them stay awake longer and study harder ... which it does. In fact, those of them that were taking phen-phen performed better on finals than those of us who didn't.

I'm starting to feel like the poor athlete who can't afford the performance enhancing drugs and will consequently miss out on the million dollar sponsorship deals.
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: analo gy on July 13, 2006, 04:53:26 PM
There is a guy at my school who smokes a bowls worth of marijuana every day. They say marijuana is very helpful in terms of relaxing, and not getting caught up in the law students mass freak-out. As a soon to be graduating 3L, he goes now to class high! He was so used to the silly routine of law school that he could get called on after having read the material in 20 minutes, pass with flying colors and BE HIGH the whole time. And he is still in the top half of his class.
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: youyou on July 13, 2006, 05:25:37 PM

Blatant coke use happens at law schools school and for the most part it is difficult to catch students on cocaine because it is not an outwardly noticeable thing.


Cocaine is not to be portrayed as a reinforcer of compulsive behaviour as it is often presented from the perspective of pathology. In contrast, one has to make room for the perspective of the majority of users in which it often appears as one of the hedonistic entities of everyday life. The importance of taking drug related pleasure as a research topic can be illustrated by the serious attempt to understand controlled drug use.

For example most cocaine users do not lose control. Apparently some "control mechanisms" exist and they are not restricted to cocaine. This conclusion has been reached by a growing number of drug researchers. A full understanding of control mechanisms is still lacking as well as a a thorough theoretical investigation of this concept itself. But, assuming the validity of such a concept, one of the regulators of drug use might very well be a relative change in drug related pleasure when drug use exceeds certain limits. A cocaine study has showed for instance that when a level of use of 2.5 grams of cocaine per week is exceeded, the number of reported unpleasant negative effects rises steeply. This could very well be one of the explanations of why levels above 2.5 gram per week are so rarely maintained over longer periods in experienced cocaine users, even though many respondents are very well able to financially support such levels of use.

In many psychological and sociological views on drug use both the concepts of drug related pleasure and controlled use are of little or no importance. Heroin and cocaine allegedly cannot be used in a controlled and pleasurable manner because the concepts of control and pleasure conflict with ruling notions. Loss of control and extreme misery is what the use of these drugs will yield. Empirical verification from an epidemiological point of view of such ex cathedra notions is still rare.

If one realizes that much of our knowledge about the use of cocaine has come from studies done by clinicians, one also comes to realize that there is a sampling bias with the data that clinicians use in their generalisations. This problem is similar to the problem one would have if our knowledge about the use of alcohol would be derived solely by the knowledge gathered by clinicians working in alcohol treatment. Alcohol users not seen by these medical professionals of course do exist and are indeed the great majority of the users of alcohol.
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: ism on July 15, 2006, 04:13:59 AM
The Nazis developed a cocaine-based drug to boost the performance of their soldiers in combat during World War II and tested it on prisoners in 1944, according to a magazine report. It was Hitler's last secret weapon to win a war he had already lost long ago. The drug, codenamed D-IX, was tested at the Sachsenhausen concentration camp north of Berlin, where prisoners loaded with 20 kg packs were reported to have marched 90 km without rest. "After 24 hours, most were completely exhausted," one former prisoner wrote in his diary. 

The Nazis had planned to issue the drug to all their soldiers, but Allied forces closed in before the project could get off the ground. From 1933 the Nazis had campaigned against the use of drugs, particularly cocaine, which was widely used in the 1920s. But as early as 1939, German soldiers were supplied with the amphetamine Pervitine, with about 29 million pills being delivered to the troops from April to December that year.
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: rev on July 15, 2006, 07:48:49 AM
LOL Funny story!

As to drugs .. Every law student does drugs. Most of them are "legal" prescription kinds. I know so many law students that told me that the only way they survived law school was to do it on drugs. Most law student are hippies anyways, and no-one can prove me wrong.

I wouldn't say "every" law student does drugs ... but a majority of them does!



i'm currently in recovery from an addiction to prescription amphetamines.  i will *not* be using drugs in school
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: reese on July 16, 2006, 04:14:32 AM

i will *not* be using drugs in school


you'll get plenty of Cs
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: rev on July 16, 2006, 09:56:47 PM

i will *not* be using drugs in school


you'll get plenty of Cs


sure i will.

run along now, sonny
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: revelare on July 17, 2006, 11:06:49 PM

The Nazis developed a cocaine-based drug to boost the performance of their soldiers in combat during World War II and tested it on prisoners in 1944, according to a magazine report. It was Hitler's last secret weapon to win a war he had already lost long ago. The drug, codenamed D-IX, was tested at the Sachsenhausen concentration camp north of Berlin, where prisoners loaded with 20 kg packs were reported to have marched 90 km without rest. "After 24 hours, most were completely exhausted," one former prisoner wrote in his diary. 

The Nazis had planned to issue the drug to all their soldiers, but Allied forces closed in before the project could get off the ground. From 1933 the Nazis had campaigned against the use of drugs, particularly cocaine, which was widely used in the 1920s. But as early as 1939, German soldiers were supplied with the amphetamine Pervitine, with about 29 million pills being delivered to the troops from April to December that year.


Hitler did pervitine himself.

From 1942, the Nazi leader Adolf Hitler received daily injections of methamphetamine from his personal physician, Dr Theodor Morell. Hitler's ailments have been attributed to everything from tertiary syphilis to Parkinson's disease. But many of The Führer's clinical signs and symptoms may have been caused by his exotic drug regimen.

In Hitler's Wehrmacht, methamphetamine tablets branded as Pervitin were liberally distributed to German fighting troops throughout the War. Amphetamines are "power drugs" that reduce fatigue, heighten aggression, and diminish human warmth and empathy.

How could Hitler continue to exert such a grip on the German people until the last days of the War? Talking to a prison psychologist while awaiting trial, ex-Governor General of Poland Hans Frank (1900-1946) describes Hitler's charismatic effect on him ...

Quote
"I can hardly understand it myself. There must be some basic evil in me. In all men. Mass hypnosis? Hitler cultivated this evil in man. When I saw him in that movie in court, I was swept along again for a moment, in spite of myself. Funny, one sits in court feeling guilt and shame. Then Hitler appears on the screen and you want to stretch out your hand to him . . . . It's not with horns on his head or with a forked tail that the devil comes to us, you know. He comes with a captivating smile, spouting idealistic sentiments, winning one's loyalty. We cannot say that Adolf Hitler violated the German people. He seduced us."
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: rev on July 18, 2006, 06:31:37 AM
kamikaze pilots were routinely tweaked prior to launch.  i guess the eurphoric effects neutralized the fear of crashing into things.

Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: desmo on July 18, 2006, 07:25:36 PM
I go back to my full time job everyday and think 'God, I can't do this for the rest of my life'...
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: inconclusive on July 20, 2006, 04:59:15 PM
(http://www2.3wisp.com/gay/map3/playeg212/i09.jpg)
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: klinex on July 21, 2006, 04:12:58 AM
great
Title: Re: BETWEEN A ROCK AND A HARD PLACE
Post by: homosexual congress on July 21, 2006, 05:53:05 PM

Discussing your penis in court doesn't stay funny for long

(http://www.lacitybeat.com/media/133/babylon_story.gif)

[...]

In the single most surreal sequence of the trial, Officer Manning bragged that he knew all about the flexibility of uncircumcised penises because he used to play baseball for the Atlanta Braves (he was a 1999 draft pick later sidelined by a knee injury) and frequently showered with players from Colombia and Central America who not only had foreskins but were frequently "silly" with them. Manning told the prosecutor he saw players pull down their foreskins and dance around for as long as 20 minutes. Schneir wasn't going to let this one go. "I'm a little confused," she said disingenuously. "I was always led to believe that men in showers go to great lengths not to look at each other's penises, and you're telling me you looked for 20 minutes?"

Members of the jury started guffawing. Manning said sheepishly that he hadn't exactly looked for 20 minutes. So Schneir asked him how long he had looked for – 15 minutes, 10 minutes, 5 minutes? Eventually, Manning said he'd looked at one penis for one minute. Schneir deadpanned: "Okay, we're all dying to know: whose penis was it?" For all the courtroom humor, from here on out the trial started slipping out of the grasp of the defense. The deputy district attorney suggested the only way to resolve the circumcision question was to have Harrell re-examined by a medical professional. Harrell told the court he'd had quite enough people looking at his penis and refused. The judge, Deirdre Hill, then instructed the jury that they were free to interpret this refusal as a form of self-incrimination. 

[...]


Hahaha, this is so funny!
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: sent on July 25, 2006, 08:43:57 PM
http://www.printthis.clickability.com/pt/cpt?action=cpt&title=The+One-Man+Drug+Company+--+New+York+Magazine&expire=&urlID=17857008&fb=Y&url=http%3A%2F%2Fnewyorkmetro.com%2Fnews%2Ffeatures%2F16653%2F&partnerID=73272
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: jason1114 on July 25, 2006, 10:02:53 PM
I go back to my full time job everyday and think 'God, I can't do this for the rest of my life'...

My last day is this Friday  ;D
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: usagain on July 26, 2006, 01:02:52 AM

http://www.printthis.clickability.com/pt/cpt?action=cpt&title=The+One-Man+Drug+Company+--+New+York+Magazine&expire=&urlID=17857008&fb=Y&url=http%3A%2F%2Fnewyorkmetro.com%2Fnews%2Ffeatures%2F16653%2F&partnerID=73272


great article
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: manilafullof on July 27, 2006, 01:13:19 AM
wow
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: lawrenc on August 05, 2006, 06:51:04 PM

http://www.printthis.clickability.com/pt/cpt?action=cpt&title=The+One-Man+Drug+Company+--+New+York+Magazine&expire=&urlID=17857008&fb=Y&url=http%3A%2F%2Fnewyorkmetro.com%2Fnews%2Ffeatures%2F16653%2F&partnerID=73272


great article


I don't think he was serious about law school
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: vault on August 07, 2006, 11:11:38 PM

Too bad, a glass of wine a day is good for you.  Far healthier than a lot of the additives in your food, anyway.


The people most likely to abuse alcohol are about mid-20s to early 30s single males making about $100,000 annually. They use alcohol to network. It has become culturally accepted in terms of relaxing and kicking back with your colleagues. They've learned to use it as an acceptable means of solving their problems.

People who go into law have personality type Type A, are hyperactive, hypomanics. They have a grandiosity and ... are risk-takers by nature. This risk on a daily basis is what keeps them focused. It also puts them more at risk for drugs and alcohol -- a lot of people use amphetamines and cocaine to get through a day. There are individuals who use cocaine to stay up during the day and smoke marijuana to go to sleep at night.
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: zarathustra on August 09, 2006, 03:56:34 AM

Crushed and snorted, they give a rush similar to cocaine, said Dr. Neil Capretto, medical director at Gateway Rehabilitation Center. "It's a double-edged sword," Capretto said. "It's become a popular drug of abuse among kids." Adderall, in particular, has emerged as the drug-of-the-moment, students and health experts said. "It's a huge asset if someone wants to spend 12 hours studying without fatigue," Heiligenstein said.


Another widely-abused prescription pill: Oxycontin

Oxycontin abusers either crush the tablet and ingest or snort it or dilute it in water and inject it. Crushing or diluting the tablet disarms the timed-release action of the medication and causes a quick, powerful high. Abusers have compared this feeling to the euphoria they experience when taking heroin. In fact, in some areas, the use of heroin is overshadowed by the abuse of OxyContin.

(http://i.cnn.net/cnn/2003/HEALTH/11/06/oxycontin.substitute.ap/story.oxycontin.jpg)
Drug users sometimes crush Oxycontin tablets and snort or inject the powder for a heroin-like high.

Two factors set OxyContin abuse apart from other prescription drug abuse. First, OxyContin is a powerful drug that contains a much larger amount of the active ingredient, oxycodone, than other prescription pain relievers. By crushing the tablet and either ingesting or snorting it, or by injecting diluted Oxycontin, abusers feel the powerful effects of the opioid in a short time, rather than over a 12-hour span. Oxycontin abusers may use heroin if their insurance will no longer pay for their OxyContin prescription, because heroin is less expensive than Oxycontin that is purchased illegally.

10mg : $1.25 : $5-10
20mg : $2.30 : $10-20
40mg : $4.00 : $25-40
80mg : $6.00 : $65-80
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: inthelaw45 on August 09, 2006, 02:53:17 PM
I think a lot of law students are manic depressive.  They swing between states of hypomania and depression, and various drug substances can help facilitate their shifting moods.

Lithium is another option, but they might be bummed out when they realize they're not hot sh*t like they believed they were during their hypomanic phase.

Either way, I think the best way to motivate yourself is to maintain friends outside of law school.  Go out with people who are in "the real world" and laugh with them.  Laughter is a major stress-relief.

Just try to stay balanced.  There comes a point when more studying will do more harm than good.
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: r e g g i e on August 11, 2006, 10:22:16 AM
Nothing beats LSD .. the insight you gain during the introspection of just one trip is worth years of self-exploring and soul-searching. Law school and lawyering, with its snobism, pretentiousness and fake arrogance, will seem funny to you afterwards ..
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: MONIKA9 on August 21, 2006, 03:28:22 AM
You can't be serious!  :-\
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: PaperChase on August 21, 2006, 10:14:31 AM
Listen to cases...It can confirm the info you already know...and the tough cases are easier to listen to.

www.audiocasefiles.com
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: mailbonding on August 24, 2006, 12:03:57 AM

You can't be serious!  :-\


Whom exactly are you talking to?  ???
Title: The One-Man Drug Company
Post by: haystack on September 04, 2006, 08:07:57 PM
After prep school, he built a thriving business. Now he’s got to find a way to get out of it.

By David Amsden

(http://newyorkmetro.com/news/features/drugcompany060410_1_560b.jpg)
One of four phones Lenny uses for business; this one is for staying in touch with runners making deliveries. The phone numbers are prepaid, attached to no name.

Every day he tells himself the same thing. You are doing nothing wrong. It plays through his mind on repeat, keeping his nerves in check. You have no reason to worry. Tonight, a Friday, he is walking down a cobblestone street in Soho, hands wedged in his leather jacket, his posture slump-shouldered, as if he’s curling in on himself. In his right-hand pocket, there is a plastic bag containing numerous smaller plastic bags — "tickets," he calls them — filled with either a gram or gram and three quarters of cocaine. The smaller ones he calls "chiquitas." They cost $60. The big ones, known simply as "big ones," go for $100. He is heading to see a customer, a twiggy, doe-eyed woman who asked to meet outside an art gallery. He thumbs through the Baggies, able to gauge the weight with his fingertips, and secures her order in his fist, all the while humming along to the voice in his head.

You are doing nothing wrong —

This is deluded, he knows, but in his business, delusion is everything: both what you're selling and how you sell it. His name is Lenny Starke, or at least that's what we'll call him here, and seven days a week he moves through the city like this: making pickups and deliveries, a sequence of handshakes and handoffs that earns him, tax-free, about $5,000 a week. This places him somewhere in the middle of the $92 billion worldwide cocaine industry, above petty street dealers, below the organized syndicates that are his main suppliers. Given Lenny's upbringing — the socially ambitious parents, the airy Manhattan apartment, the uptown private school — dealing seems an odd career choice. But to him, it's almost logical. His financial portfolio is impressive: $30,000 in a safe bolted to the floor of his apartment, another $25,000 in storage at a "wholesome" friend's house, and a steady stream being invested and washed clean in the stock market. And when Lenny wants to spend a weekend on Shelter Island or comes down with a cold or just feels like staying inside and playing Grand Theft Auto—a video game in which the hero is a drug dealer—he has a rotating cast of employees who do the work for him. All this, and he is not yet 25. "I'm going to be financially set," says Lenny. "I can skip a step. I'm able to pay for my apartment without having to work a crap job or having to ask Mommy and Daddy to send me rent checks every month—that, to me, is just as bad."

It's an absurdly warm night for March, still early, edging on 6:30, that hour when the tension of the workweek gets eclipsed by a restive desire to get a little lost. Lenny's cell rings repeatedly. Per dealer protocol, the number is prepaid, attached to no name, untraceable. The phone is an old-school, beat-to-hell Nokia that he refuses to upgrade, Lenny being somewhat superstitious. "Probably it's the warm weather, but I'm thinking tonight's gonna be busy," he says after taking a call, this one from a 21-year-old kid so "papered up" — Lenny's term for those with enviable wealth—that his parents bought him an entire brownstone. "The kid is a spoiled brat, basically, who wants to pretend he's all thugged out," Lenny continues, seemingly unaware that the same could be said about him. "Anyway, those calls just now? That's three more orders, and we only walked, what? Four blocks. It's cool, but I was hoping to kick it, have a beer. I've been working since, like, noon, right? Went up to midtown for the day shift. That's finance types mainly, guys in suits, some people in fashion. I meet them at their offices. Or on the street, real quick, boom-boom, you know? Or in banks, right in the lobby by the ATMs. Banks are my favorite. Nobody is thinking people are buying coke at a bank."

Dealing has always appealed to Lenny's two most dominant personality traits: an obsession with money and chronic impatience, characteristics that don't exactly set him apart from his peers, kids who came of age during the hip-hop and Internet booms, two movements united by the philosophy that money is something to be made quickly, dubiously, and only in large amounts. "I was always the kid that wanted more," is how Lenny puts it. "I never grew up with nothing, but I never had enough. If you gave me $20, I wanted $40. I like eating out, I like nice things. I can’t really function if I can't get what I want. Ever since I was little, I would just go out and get, you know?"

(http://newyorkmetro.com/news/features/drugcompany060410_2_198.jpg)
About $25,000, a fraction of his savings. He nets an average of $5,000 a week and stores much of his money in a safe bolted to the floor of his apartment.

But, lately, as his friends settle into careers in private-equity consulting and cosmetics PR, Lenny has found himself questioning his profession. Whenever he tries to imagine himself five or ten years down the line, his mind either shudders and comes up blank, or spits back images of clichéd cautionary tales: Lenny the Addict, Lenny in Jail, Lenny Dead. "I'm not gonna be 30 years old and feeding my babies with this," he declares, but given that he's often in debt up to $15,000 to a man who regularly carries a gun, getting out is more complicated than suddenly growing a conscience and tossing your phone into the East River. "You have to get out smoothly," says Lenny. "Same way you got in."

With this in mind, he has recently set in motion a plan for retirement, one that gains momentum with each customer he greets —

"Hey, baby, what's up?"

Outside the gallery, the doe-eyed woman hurries across the street, her vintage riding boots clicking on the cobblestones. There must be an opening tonight, because bodies are pouring into the street, blocking traffic. Beneath the thin yellow glow of the streetlights, the figures are silhouetted: a sea of conceptualized hairstyles all referencing bands that Lenny, who listens almost exclusively to hip-hop, has never heard of.

"Yeah, baby, long time no see."

With that, Gallery Girl presses her waxen cheek to his, kissing the air just below his earlobe. Lenny can smell her perfume — vaguely citrus, superclean. He shakes her hand, sliding the two big ones she ordered into her palm. She slips the Baggies into her purse as they walk through the crowd making small talk, two old friends who know nothing about each other. Eventually, they stop and she gives him another delicate kiss, this time reaching out her other hand, the one that's been palming $200 the entire time.

"See ya, baby," she says, cantering across the street and disappearing through the gallery door.

Lenny, meanwhile, goes into accounting mode.

After every delivery, he pulls out his T-Mobile Sidekick and uses its tiny keypad to record the specifics of the transaction just completed: customer nickname, quantity purchased, cash received. This information will be erased later tonight, once he gets home and downloads it into a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet tracking every deal he's made over the past year. That file is then purged from his hard drive and stored on an unlabeled diskette: a cheap, flimsy piece of plastic that Lenny hopes will make him a small fortune. Like many markets, the drug business thrives on mergers and acquisitions, or what is known in the trade as "selling your numbers" — giving up your phone and client list for a fee. Every dealer keeps track of his profits in one way or another, though Lenny's Excel document is likely a rare prep-school touch, one he hopes will boost his sale price. Recently, he heard about a pot-delivery service going for $50,000, but cocaine is both a pricier drug and a growth industry — use among adults has been increasing nationally since 1999 — so he's thinking he could double that number. "The rule in any business is that you don't sell your company for what it makes in a year," explains Lenny, "but for what it makes in two or three or four years, right? Well, in my business, you can't do that. Someone gets arrested and — boom — it's over. So you gotta sell it based on what you make in, like, six months."

And that, in outline, is Lenny Starke's retirement plan: Cash in, cash out, and use the windfall to invest in something legitimate. A business of some sort. Real estate, for instance. Maybe get an M.B.A. Every now and then Lenny even thinks, half-seriously, about law school. "Yeah, it's ironic or whatever. People say, 'Oh, law school, yeah-yeah ...' But doing this has made me better suited," he claims. "I'm a good talker, good at sitting down with people and working out deals. Half of law is the pretrial stuff you don't see on TV, striking deals behind the curtain, which all comes down to money. Well, that's the *&^% I do every day."
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: haystack on September 04, 2006, 08:25:02 PM
To find the origin of Lenny's hustling instinct — to understand how an upper-middle-class kid becomes a serious drug dealer — you have to go back to high school. Freshman year, he was a skinny kid, decent at sports, interested in student government. But by the time he was 15, Lenny had joined the ranks of privileged children who, searching for appealing avenues of rebellion, choose to emulate the lower classes with a cartoonish take on black culture. "Basically," he says, "I started running around acting like a fake thug," a pastime that revolved around "local street-dogging-type things," like stealing North Face jackets off the backs of younger kids and skipping class to smoke blunts in back alleys. Lenny loved pot, but he also saw it as a business opportunity, partly because selling would mean free product for himself. Like his favorite rapper, Tupac Shakur, put it: I smoke blunts on a regular, @#!* when it counts / I'm tryin' to make a million dollars outta quarter ounce.

"It was almost like a hobby at first," says Lenny. "I remember when I got my first ounce, breaking it up, how it was like a little celebration." Moving from buyer to seller proved surprisingly easy: Just tell the guy selling you that dime bag that you're looking to buy in larger quantities; he'd rather sell an ounce all at once than move it one gram at a time. From the beginning, Lenny displayed a knack for business. He went down to Chinatown and purchased hundreds of tiny clear-plastic cubes: blue for boys, pink for girls, his first foray into elementary branding principles. He had a stationery company print up 1,000 business cards — the word juice surrounded by palm trees, his pager number in the bottom right corner. But his greatest innovation was his distribution method: "I made somebody else sell it for me. I got the stereotypes, one of the only black kids, so nobody knew it was me."

(http://newyorkmetro.com/news/features/drugcompany060410_3_198.jpg)
One ounce of cocaine, purchased for $800 in Washington Heights, bagged and ready to be sold for $2,500.

"It was almost like a hobby at first," says Lenny. "I remember when I got my first ounce, breaking it up, how it was like a little celebration." Moving from buyer to seller proved surprisingly easy: Just tell the guy selling you that dime bag that you're looking to buy in larger quantities; he’d rather sell an ounce all at once than move it one gram at a time. From the beginning, Lenny displayed a knack for business. He went down to Chinatown and purchased hundreds of tiny clear-plastic cubes: blue for boys, pink for girls, his first foray into elementary branding principles. He had a stationery company print up 1,000 business cards — the word juice surrounded by palm trees, his pager number in the bottom right corner. But his greatest innovation was his distribution method: "I made somebody else sell it for me. I got the stereotypes, one of the only black kids, so nobody knew it was me."

Then, just as the business was running smoothly, something unexpected happened: High school came to an end. As Lenny watched his friends get accepted to places like Wesleyan and Yale and Skidmore, his mailbox filled with rejection letters. He ended up at a college never once mentioned by his school's guidance counselor, which only reinforced the notion that his talents lay elsewhere. So he expanded his services to include Ecstasy, LSD, mushrooms, Special K. In a shift so subtle he didn't even notice it at the time, Lenny went from being a fake thug to a kid who resembled the real thing. "I'm upper middle class," he says. "I didn't grow up with a gun in my house, but I fell in love with that gangster *&^%." He looked sharp in a fur-trimmed hoodie. His velour track pants were Sean John. He walked with a no-bull swagger. When a heavily tattooed kid conned him out of 100 pills of Ecstasy, Lenny sought retribution: He set up a fake deal and hired an associate to press a pistol into the guy's ribs as they drove around Queens. "Come on, man! Please! I don't wanna die in these streets!" he screamed as Lenny, sitting in the backseat, looked on impassively.

It was only a matter of time before one of his friends—an increasingly shady lot of outer-borough roughnecks, none of them connected to his private-school past—introduced Lenny to the cocaine trade. "One day, he pulls me aside," Lenny recalls, "and he's like, 'You've got to check this out.' It was a f-ing manila envelope full of cocaine. Pure, powdery. No rocks, nothing. He was like, 'I got this girl in South America, she sends it to me.' You wouldn't believe how many of these f-ing letters come through. You can put an ounce of cocaine in there" — 28 grams, about $2,500 on the street — "and by the time it gets here, it's like a thin piece of paper." Lenny had tried coke once before but didn't understand the fuss people made over a substance that, to his mind, made you nervous for fifteen minutes, a fiend for two hours, then depressed for an entire day. "But I'm like, @#!* it. I did a line, and it was amazing. I traded 60 pills of Ecstasy for 20 grams. I split it up into little Baggies, then I ended up sniffing all my profits away. But I sold a little bit of it and kept in touch with the guy, and from there ..." Lenny lingers on the memory for a moment. "Well, I was serious about it."

He was 21, barely going to class, hooked up with an anonymous South American distributor, and selling coke to friends, friends of friends, and people he didn't recognize who swore they were friends. Somewhat unwittingly, he was building a network that tapped into an underserved demographic: white kids in their twenties who were curious about coke but didn't have a reliable source. These were customers born in the mid-eighties—too young to have vivid recollections of the crack epidemic. By the time they were entering the prime years of postadolescent experimentation, cocaine had been socially declassified as a scourge, doing a line no more frowned upon than puffing on a joint. "Now everyone's into coke, talking about it openly, laughing about it," says Lenny, echoing a 2005 report from the National Drug Intelligence Center, which noted that the perceived risk associated with powder cocaine has steadily declined, especially among the young, since the early nineties. "Do you listen to hip-hop?" Lenny asks. "Suddenly, every rapper's talking about coke." He mentions Cam'ron, the platinum-selling Harlem artist: What you want, coke or piff? / I got it all smoke or sniff ... Bird's-eye view / The birds I knew / Flip birds / Bird gang / It was birds I flew ...

"Birds," explains Lenny, "is slang for a kilo of coke."

The letters from South America weren’t arriving fast enough, so Lenny asked around and found another connection: a surly older guy who often had a gun tucked into the waist of his pants. "We've never had a conversation longer than ten seconds," says Lenny, but he suspected that his new supplier was "mobbed up." His product was even more pure, and reasonable at $25 a gram, about a third of the street value. (The Bush administration claims that thanks to the $4 billion war on drugs in Colombia, cocaine in the U.S. now costs $170 a gram and is 15% less pure than it used to be. "I don't know who their connection is," Lenny deadpans, "but someone's getting ripped off.") Lenny would buy anywhere from 200 to 600 grams at a time from his new source, the coke coming not in powder form but in a hard, crystalline brick—not excessively "doctored up" with baking soda or baby laxatives. Sometimes, depending on how much he picked up, Lenny could see the symbol of the cartel indented in the brick.

He had money in his pocket, a Glock 9 hidden away for protection, and superfluous jewelry jangling from his neck and wrists. He was also dipping into the product with greater frequency, developing a habit that rivaled most of his customers'. He took a leave of absence from school and moved back into the city, holing up with a friend in an unfurnished apartment, his days an alkaloid blur of crushing up product, sniffing, selling, and muting cocaine's tweaky comedown with heroic quantities of hydroponic pot. Nights rolled around, and Lenny, barely of legal drinking age, was cruising around in limos and spending $2,000 on bottle service. "I used to be the king of Suede," he says, more embarrassed than proud of this today. It was around this time that he discovered "coke groupies," quasi-anorexic girls willing to give up any last shred of dignity for a free line. But their presence was better in theory than reality. "Sex is overrated," says Lenny, "or at least it's only worthwhile if it's with a girl you're crazy into." One night, he had to take a Viagra just to be able to perform adequately, an experience no 21-year-old man should have to live through.
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: haystack on September 04, 2006, 08:30:57 PM
Lenny was pushing it, he knew. Sitting on the couch in the middle of the day, he’d glance over at his buddy — his sallow skin, the way his eyes had caved into his face, the spastic twitch in his jaw — and some fogged-over cluster of cells in Lenny’s mind would remind him that he was practically looking in the mirror. Then one day he showed up at his apartment and right away he could tell something was off. He walked through the entryway and into the kitchen, taking in the upturned drawers, the broken dishes, the slashed mattress in the bedroom, the clothes all over the floor — it was so surreal that it took him a moment to process that he'd been robbed. His TV and DVD and VCR were gone. So were a pound of marijuana and a briefcase safe with $25,000 inside — the bulk of his life savings. And it wasn't a random act. The thief had entered the apartment through the roof. Lenny had been targeted. The past few months flashed back like a checklist of how not to run a business. All those nights he tooled around in white stretch limos, just because he could. And the steady stream of nameless girls with Gucci-embossed leather bags prancing in and out at all hours. To say nothing of his own wardrobe of Purple Label cashmere sweaters from Ralph Lauren, Prada loafers, silk-lined Donna Karan motorcycle pants, and the eighteen-karat-gold Cuban necklace hanging stupidly from his neck — $2,500 worth of precious metal practically taunting someone to jump him.

"I blamed myself," says Lenny, "for being so loose."

He considered getting out right then. He owed his connection $5,000, which happened to be exactly what he had in his savings account. He could chalk up the burglary as some kind of accidental intervention, pay off his debts, and move on. Or he could get serious: Stop using, keep a low profile, stay in the game another year or two, and cash out. For all the talk of dealers inevitably imploding, Lenny knew scores of guys who owned buildings, small businesses, racehorses—guys you’d never suspect got started pushing product. His indiscretions aside, these had always been his business models.

He reached for his phone, dialed his connection.

"Yo, I've been jacked," he said. "I need you to loan me some stuff, help me get back on my feet."

Two years later, Lenny is on the move. He climbs the cracked tile steps of an East Village walk-up, delivering a chiquita to a painter who lives in a funky little studio. He's got a $5,000 watch on his wrist, but other than that, he is inconspicuous, efficient, a pro. From the East Village, he hops a cab uptown — no driving for Lenny; owning a car is "too hot" — and drops off two big ones at an Upper West Side apartment, then another chiquita to an asset-management specialist standing outside an Irish pub in Hell's Kitchen. "It's all about the speed getting to each spot," Lenny explains as he slides into the backseat of another cab, pouring the Baggies into his lap and counting them. "If I'm taking too long, someone will call back and say, 'I'm gonna call someone else.' That's the competition, you know?"

Meanwhile, one of his "partners" is traversing the city making similar stops, staying in constant contact via Nextel. He'll sell $1,000 worth of tickets tonight, keeping 20% of the profits and kicking $800 up to Lenny. Until recently, Lenny always hired other people to do the grunt work, just like in high school. "That way, I'm getting paid," he says, "but no one's putting my face to the service." But these days, since he's priming his company for auction, he prefers to do as much of the work himself as he can. In a business of deception, finding trustworthy employees is a challenge: A few months back, Lenny caught a worker cutting his Baggies with baking soda, pocketing the extra profits, and pissing off regular customers, which is just the sort of misstep he can't afford to repeat. He's already piqued the interest of a few potential buyers and plans to start showing them the spreadsheet over the next few months. ("Honestly, I don't even know if drug people know how to read a spreadsheet," says Lenny. "We'll just have to see.") Serious prospects will then trail him for a week, to see that the numbers add up. Then he'll make the biggest deal of his life —assuming, of course, that he is genuinely ready to give up the game.

On the corner of 24th and Sixth, Lenny meets up with two club kids, followed by a bartender at a gay bar farther downtown. Then it's another cab back to the East Village. He has just shy of 200 regular customers, and the list grows solely by word of mouth: When Lenny gets a call from an unfamiliar number, he asks for a reference, then calls that reference to make sure it's legitimate. His primary market is still kids in their 20s, many of them new to the city, the majority living in the East Village and on the Lower East Side. But he does not discriminate. Among his regulars are strivers, slackers, black kids, white kids, Asian kids, NYU kids, socialites, agoraphobics, a lesbian couple, an Afghan lawyer, an Ivy League undergrad who deals Lenny's product on campus, and a Russian "diplomat brat" who lives out of town but comes to New York twice a month to hole up in a hotel suite with his lover. "I'd like to market more in the finance world," says Lenny. 'One guy I know, he's always telling me to go after that scene, dudes who have no issue burning through $500 on a Friday night. But it takes time. You're basically saying to people, 'Tell your friends about me,' and hoping the message gets to the right people."

At least 6 million Americans do cocaine every year, making it more popular than 50 Cent's last album. Ninety percent of the supply comes from Colombian cartels, passing through numerous hands before it reaches Lenny. Because 72% of the cocaine comes across the Texas-Mexico border, Houston has emerged as America's leading distribution center. (The rest arrives by ship via the Caribbean, with a small percentage coming directly from South America.) From Houston, the drug is shipped to other cities hidden in tractor trailers. Once it reaches New York, the supply is controlled mainly by the Mafia and Latino street gangs. Lenny has contacts in both worlds. That way, he can play the two against each other, keeping the price low and quality high. Whenever one supplier jacks up the price, Lenny takes his business elsewhere until the price comes down. "That's why we call it 'the game,' " he says.

Truly pure cocaine is impossible to come across on the street; most users are so accustomed to sniffing diluted product that pure coke would be too potent to enjoy. A kilo arriving in the U.S. tends to be 80 to 90% pure and cost between $17,000 and $25,000. Before reaching someone like Lenny, it’s cut twice to make four kilos with about 22% purity, each of which will then generate around $100,000 in street-level sales. (Some kilos are cut up to three times, bringing the purity down to 11 percent, but you can only sell this inferior product in "ignorant" markets—college kids, indiscriminate addicts, etc.) Lenny tests the purity of all his purchases by weighing it, cooking it, then placing it on a triple-beam balance: The additives sizzle away, revealing the weight of the pure drug. "My suppliers are straight with me," he says, "because they know I'll know if they start giving me *&^%. Since I'm making them money, f-ing me on quality is not in their interest. So if it's not that good, they tell me, and I only buy a little to keep them happy. When it's good, that's when I stock up, keeping my customers happy."

Lenny prefers his "mobbed up" connection, because with him, Lenny can run a tab, paying only 50% up front. Also, the product is delivered to Lenny's apartment, allowing him to avoid walking the streets in possession of enough cocaine to put him in jail for 25 years. But sometimes things happen — turf wars, executions — that temporarily pinch the supply and increase the price, at which point Lenny takes a nerve-racking trip uptown, where the cocaine trade is split between the blacks of East Harlem and the Latinos of Washington Heights. According to a report by the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy, Washington Heights is "the primary distribution center for retail and wholesale cocaine and heroin throughout the Northeast," a fact that comes as no surprise to Lenny, who knows numerous blocks where half the crumbling buildings are fronts for bulk narcotics distribution. Each street has a boss, who employs women and children to do the work, so Lenny ends up buying two ounces of coke from "like a 20-year-old hoochie gangster female dog" who hides the product in her cleavage. "You give her a hug, cop a little feel, deal done," Lenny explains. A white guy with a private-school diploma can easily become a piñata in this world, but Lenny knows how to behave. "You just have to show up with attitude," he says. "Basically, you give them a look that says, If you don't @#!* with me this time, I'll be back. Also, the first few times, I brought my gun. You know, just in case."
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: haystack on September 04, 2006, 08:41:51 PM
At Tompkins Square Park, Lenny hops out of the cab. It's well past midnight now, and the street is teeming with scraggly indie rockers, suburban pseudo-punks, and other kids giving new personalities a test run. Lenny hooks up two girls with rigorously straightened hair, then darts into a nearby bar, where he ducks into the bathroom with a graduate student, emerging $200 richer. On occasion, Lenny sells other drugs—pot and Ecstasy, mainly — but he has built his company around cocaine because it's the most lucrative and, these days, the most in-demand. He could make substantially more selling larger quantities: moving into wholesale, supplying guys like him. But that would mean storing keys in his apartment, and Lenny rarely buys more than half a kilo at a time. He carries much less than that, so that if he's arrested, his jail time would be minimal, likely just a few days. "It's like this," he says. "Whoever I deal with deals with a gang, someone who's taking the risk of talking to the cartel. I pay a little bit more to stay disconnected from that."

But staying disconnected from the syndicate level means being more connected to the spontaneous customer, an increasingly capricious contingent the later it gets. As Lenny walks out of the bar, his cell phone rings, beckoning him to a Nolita apartment, where a self-tanned, stiletto-heeled woman insists he kiss her new lapdog before she pays him for her three grams.

"Oh, come on!" she begs.

"I see the dog," says Lenny. "Very cute. But I’m good."

"Just a little peck! Don't be a prude!"

Lenny rolls his eyes, obliging as she rummages through a drawer, searching for her money. The cash is buried under a stack of empty boxes of Lexapro, an antidepressant. Lenny walks out, shaking his head. "It gets mad lonely and depressing," he says, ducking into a bar and ordering a beer. As he scans the crowd—kids his age, all huddled in groups, faces flushed, enjoying themselves — his melancholy turns bitter. "And here I am, a Friday night, running around like this. Do you see me with friends? No. Do you think I can have a serious girlfriend? f**ck no. How can I have a girl? They say I don't commit, I don't give back. Well, no *&^%. I'm too busy pretending to be nice to bitches like that, coke fiends I don't even know."

Lenny sighs, rubs his temples, orders another beer. Sometimes he can't help but be disgusted by his customers, people living the heedless life he gave up when he "changed from being a consumer in that environment to being a provider for that lifestyle." But Lenny is a consummate salesman, and to his customers he plays the role of cordial and crooked shrink, supplying all the hollow justifications that once kept his own fears at bay. When clients invite him to hang out, Lenny understands their motives: They need to convince themselves that he is merely a friend who happens to have drugs on him, not a dealer supporting an unhealthy habit. So Lenny chills, sips a beer. Sometimes customers insist he do a line with them, at which point Lenny, who no longer uses, "accidentally" blows out through the straw so the coke flies everywhere, and then laughs it off. Every morning, he wakes up to a dozen missed calls on the Nokia, all delivery requests made between 4 and 6 in the morning, all from a few jonesing clients. When he calls back, the customer always plays innocent: must've been a fluke of the phone, a mistake of some sort. And at least once a night, a client will hesitate at the last minute, coming down with a case of buyer's remorse, at which point Lenny is forced to really turn it on. "I'll sit back and reassure you," he says. "Like, 'Listen, I'm not going to criticize you for what you do. If you think you've done a lot, it's nothing compared to what a lot of people do or what I've personally done in a week's time. If you're really stressed out from your girlfriend and you want to go out all night and have a good time — please, I understand where you're coming from.' "

When Lenny thinks a customer truly is going too far, he will refuse to make the delivery. But even this is a subversive form of business management: "The client that buys a little bit consistently is way better than the client that, like, OD's and then never wants to do it again." This Lenny learned from a customer who lived near Union Square. First it was one delivery a week, then two, then three. On each visit, his customer seemed 10 pounds lighter. Lenny noticed that the same miserable pizza would sit on his kitchen table for a week straight, clearly the guy's sole source of nourishment. At one point, he owed Lenny $500 and disappeared completely. "Then he comes back, like, 'Hi, I went to rehab!' " Lenny recalls. "I'm like, 'That's cool, man, pay my ass and stay away from this *&^%.' I was happy for him. He looked better, was going to the gym. But sure enough, he starts smoking weed again, then doing coke again. And — boom — this time he left the country. Haven't heard from him since."

Lenny is not immune to guilt. "Sometimes I feel like a vulture, like if it wasn't me selling it, half my customers wouldn't be comfortable doing it," he says, before reverting back to the entrepreneur's selective, capitalistic logic: "At the same time, I don't create the demand, right? The product sells itself. My job is to get the word around, let people know it's available, and be responsible about making my appointments." In the end, what's most difficult for Lenny is admitting that the rush he gets from selling — the instant gratification, the bolstered confidence, the feeling that he's the nucleus around which everything orbits — is in many ways identical to what his customers call him to experience. As much as he says he is working to sell his business, it's hard to know if and when he'll make the move.

"In September," says Lenny. "I'm out in September." It's after three in the morning now, and he is walking along East Houston, past dingy bars serving last call and drowsy-eyed girls in heels and pre-torn jeans. The coke-to-cash ratio in his pockets has shifted, from about 30 tickets and $20, to three tickets and $2,500. A busy night, as predicted. "Or maybe October," he goes on. "I don't f**cking know. November at the absolute latest. Or I might wait for the holiday season, that's the hottest time of the year. Probably January '07." Looking for after-work drinking partners, Lenny calls a few friends from high school and a girl "I'm, like, basically in love with." But no one picks up. "I'm telling you, man, I'm sick of this," he says. 'I hardly go out with anyone, right? And when I do, guess who always picks up the bar tab? Everyone eats off me. Always. They don't like what I do, but they like what it gets them. Girls act all worried, then ask to borrow my credit card. It's f**cked up, but there it is."

It's not that Lenny doesn't realize how lucky he is. He has no police record, has never had a gun pulled on him, and hasn't had to threaten violence since he switched to selling coke. But he also knows that everyone's luck eventually runs out. Some nights, thinking about this, he can barely sleep. "I have nightmares all the time," he says. "I'm getting shot in the head, or I'm awaiting bail. I shoot people in my dreams no problem, I go on all these murderous rampages. Someone steals $50K from me and keeps saying, 'I didn't steal it, I didn't steal it!' I have mad issues about trust. I'm sure that if I went to a doctor, I could get all sorts of drugs. Like anti-anxiety or whatever."

Not long ago, Lenny was on one of his law-school kicks again. He bought a book of LSAT practice tests, turned off his phone, and sat down to see how he would do. They proved more challenging than he expected. So accustomed to being on the move, he hasn't mastered the skill of sitting still for 2 and a half hours. He tapped his foot. His eyes darted around. His mind got snagged on more immediate business concerns. "Thing is," he says, "every 6 months I stay in it, I can throw another $25K onto my price. More people talk about me, more people call me, my number becomes more valuable. But then I get there, and I want more. That's always been my problem. It's a risk, but obviously there is appeal in that, you know? It's not like I don't want to get out. I do. It's just ... "

But Lenny doesn't finish the thought. His phone rings, a customer from earlier looking to replenish his supply. A seven-block walk for an extra $60. Lenny shakes his head. "f**ck it," he says. "Let's get on that."

http://www.printthis.clickability.com/pt/cpt?action=cpt&title=The+One-Man+Drug+Company+--+New+York+Magazine&expire=&urlID=17857008&fb=Y&url=http%3A%2F%2Fnewyorkmetro.com%2Fnews%2Ffeatures%2F16653%2F&partnerID=73272
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: seine on September 09, 2006, 05:45:48 AM
Why did you paste it here, we could just click on the link and read the whole thing ..
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: chickenbreast on September 19, 2006, 07:43:28 PM

Nothing beats LSD .. the insight you gain during the introspection of just one trip is worth years of self-exploring and soul-searching. Law school and lawyering, with its snobism, pretentiousness and fake arrogance, will seem funny to you afterwards ..


LSD is one such drug that will make you think the furry you're @ # ! * i n g in the ass is actually a hell-bent hare whose face is melting off. Often, it will cause users to have Vietnam war-style flashbacks and think Quasidan's penis is coming to get them.
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: Opie on October 27, 2006, 01:32:24 PM
(http://img345.imageshack.us/img345/2819/250628475500qs0.jpg)
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: theworldinahand on November 06, 2006, 10:31:03 PM
Mother Nature has created all these nice and beautiful things for us to live with/by/for .. it's sad we don't have the courage to face the fact that we're nothing else but an extension of nature; or pretend that we can label as 'evil', 'dangerous,' whatever, things that we could use to our advantage and live more comfortably ..
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: V e r a on December 05, 2007, 02:11:48 PM

I prefer my Colombian coffee.


I don't think the Colombian thing is a good idea. I mean, emotional liberation, breakdown of communication barriers, increased feelings of self worth, elimination of the need for sleep and lack of appetite granted, what about the heightened risk of cerebral hemorrhages (stokes), heart and circulatory failure and paranoid psychoses?


Excuse me???
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: a l i n d on January 17, 2008, 02:48:12 PM

I thought I would ask the question: How many students here take drugs? And when I say "drugs" I mean amphetamines, marijuana, alcohol abuse, or name your own drug. Seems down right ludicrous the Bar Examiners may be reluctant to admit you to the bar if you have a DUI on your record but you could be a raging coke-head with no record and be admitted.

I hear 50% of students are on amphetamines. They claim it helps them stay awake longer and study harder ... which it does. In fact, those of them that were taking phen-phen performed better on finals than those of us who didn't.

I'm starting to feel like the poor athlete who can't afford the performance enhancing drugs and will consequently miss out on the million dollar sponsorship deals.


Well, drugs may lead to nowhere, but at least it's the scenic route! ;)

Anyway, getting serious now -- there were two babies born on the same day at the same hospital. They lay there and looking at each other. Their families eventually took them away. Eighty years later, they were in the same hospital, on their deathbeds, next to each other. One of them looked at the other and said, "So. What did you think?"
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: resume on February 01, 2008, 11:35:15 AM

[...] or pretend that we can label as 'evil', 'dangerous,' whatever, things that we could use to our advantage and live more comfortably ..


We do not pretend that we can label them as 'evil', 'dangerous'...we actually label them as such.
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: backaregodi on March 13, 2008, 04:28:54 AM

Nothing beats LSD .. the insight you gain during the introspection of just one trip is worth years of self-exploring and soul-searching. Law school and lawyering, with its snobism, pretentiousness and fake arrogance, will seem funny to you afterwards ..


The real reason LSD needs to be illegal is not because it makes a tiny percentage of its users crazy, but because of what it does to the vast majority ... LSD does not attract non-conformists so much as it is creates them. One can not, for example, after a serious immersion in LSD, go back to the 9-to-5 world of sales managers and upward mobility. Better to work for yourself, doing something simple and useful, which was why so many hippies became entrepreneurs, farmers, craftspeople. For most, the psychedelic experience dealt a serious blow to their desire for power, and all those buttresses to the power urge that go by the name ambition. The man who comes back through the Door in the Wall will never be the same as the man who went out. He will be wiser but less cocksure, happier but less self satisfied, humbler in acknowledging his ignorance, yet better equipped to understand the relationship of words to things, of systematic reasoning to the unfathomable Mystery which it tries, forever vainly, to comprehend.

"Bad trips" on LSD result from the 11-hour forced introspection that the drug creates. Most cannot stand to look that closely at themselves, certainly not for that long. That's why Leary and company were getting complete cures of psychotics after five or six guided LSD trips, of course, before the government stepped in and outlawed the drug. Well, movie "The Passion of Christ," by Mel Gibson is like being on acid for two straight hours, only the subject isn't yourself, it is Jesus.

Dr. Timothy Leary, interviewed by Playboy, announced that LSD was the most powerful aphrodisiac ever discovered. "Let me put it this way," he said, "compared with sex under LSD, the way you have been making love -- no matter how ecstatic the pleasure you think you get from it – is like making love to a department-store-window dummy. "The three inevitable goals of the LSD session are to discover and make love with God, to discover and make love with yourself, and to discover and make love with a woman."
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: dulcy on March 13, 2008, 07:15:13 AM
to discover and make love with yourself,
I've been doing that for years without using LSD.  ;)
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: tide on March 13, 2008, 03:19:13 PM

to discover and make love with yourself,


I've been doing that for years without using LSD.  ;)


(http://img138.imageshack.us/img138/3938/69254650499f59c13ayr2.jpg)
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: Cleo on March 16, 2008, 04:23:56 PM

If you're not gay, a druggie, a fag hag or a whore, don't even think about going to Crobar -- you'll be treated as a nuisance.
 

crobar appears to be like law school


LOL r e g g i e ;)
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: Dundee on March 18, 2008, 10:15:59 AM
Ketanmine is a very promising drug for occasional use -- trippy almost like LSD, yet lasts only about 2 hours, which is good if you get a bad trip.
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: C o c o on March 19, 2008, 08:04:58 AM

Ketanmine is a very promising drug for occasional use -- trippy almost like LSD, yet lasts only about 2 hours, which is good if you get a bad trip.


Ketamine was the anaesthetic of choice for war medics treating the casualties of the Vietnam conflict. But today it is better known as the designer drug of the dance-floor generation. If you ask most people if they've tried 'Special K' they assume you're talking about the popular low-fat breakfast cereal. But on the street the term refers to ketamine -- the by-now-popular drug on the dance scene. There's also an emerging trend of mixing the drug, also dubbed vitamin K.
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: mgkoefod on March 19, 2008, 08:52:42 AM
I like to spend one day just concentrating on one subject. That way I don't have to lug all the books around and that overwhelming feeling doesn't kick in. Today for example is Civ Pro day and I'm working on my outline and reviewing all of the cases, trying to work out the answers to old exams, etc. This might not work for all people (who might get bored doing Civ Pro all day), but I find it better and easier to concentrate than looking at the Property book in the corner and going "Oh crap, I have so much to do!"

This is great advice!
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: multifarious on March 22, 2008, 04:26:21 PM

Nothing beats LSD .. the insight you gain during the introspection of just one trip is worth years of self-exploring and soul-searching. Law school and lawyering, with its snobism, pretentiousness and fake arrogance, will seem funny to you afterwards ..


[...] For most, the psychedelic experience dealt a serious blow to their desire for power, and all those buttresses to the power urge that go by the name ambition. The man who comes back through the Door in the Wall will never be the same as the man who went out. He will be wiser but less cocksure, happier but less self satisfied, humbler in acknowledging his ignorance, yet better equipped to understand the relationship of words to things, of systematic reasoning to the unfathomable Mystery which it tries, forever vainly, to comprehend.

[...]


Indeed, LSD makes a person very suggestible, and that's the royal road to wisdom -- that's what Timothy Leary used to say. LSD can be regarded as a chemical means to produce the fresh, baby-like perception that is necessary to inaugurate new approaches and habits. But, using LSD to produce vulnerability is okay only if the set and setting for the experience are benign. For instance, from the '50s to early '70s, the CIA tested the drug's brainwashing utility in 149 projects at universities, hospitals and prisons; in 39 of them, LSD was often given without the recipients' knowledge or consent. [In fact, every spook in the CIA, including President Bush has taken LSD.] William James, the father of modern American psychology, said the best cure for dipsomania is religomania and the non-denominational peak experience produced by LSD seemed to many researchers to have great potential for treating drug and alcohol problems.
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: A l m a on March 23, 2008, 01:24:01 PM

Nothing beats LSD .. the insight you gain during the introspection of just one trip is worth years of self-exploring and soul-searching. Law school and lawyering, with its snobism, pretentiousness and fake arrogance, will seem funny to you afterwards ..


The real reason LSD needs to be illegal is not because it makes a tiny percentage of its users crazy, but because of what it does to the vast majority ... LSD does not attract non-conformists so much as it is creates them. One can not, for example, after a serious immersion in LSD, go back to the 9-to-5 world of sales managers and upward mobility. Better to work for yourself, doing something simple and useful, which was why so many hippies became entrepreneurs, farmers, craftspeople. For most, the psychedelic experience dealt a serious blow to their desire for power, and all those buttresses to the power urge that go by the name ambition. The man who comes back through the Door in the Wall will never be the same as the man who went out. He will be wiser but less cocksure, happier but less self satisfied, humbler in acknowledging his ignorance, yet better equipped to understand the relationship of words to things, of systematic reasoning to the unfathomable Mystery which it tries, forever vainly, to comprehend.

"Bad trips" on LSD result from the 11-hour forced introspection that the drug creates. Most cannot stand to look that closely at themselves, certainly not for that long. That's why Leary and company were getting complete cures of psychotics after five or six guided LSD trips, of course, before the government stepped in and outlawed the drug. Well, movie "The Passion of Christ," by Mel Gibson is like being on acid for two straight hours, only the subject isn't yourself, it is Jesus.

Dr. Timothy Leary, interviewed by Playboy, announced that LSD was the most powerful aphrodisiac ever discovered. "Let me put it this way," he said, "compared with sex under LSD, the way you have been making love -- no matter how ecstatic the pleasure you think you get from it – is like making love to a department-store-window dummy. "The three inevitable goals of the LSD session are to discover and make love with God, to discover and make love with yourself, and to discover and make love with a woman."


I definately think LSD is great for introspection. But what if it is an external reality you want to attach yourself to? I tend to believe you'd prefer K-hole levels ketamine in a nice, comfortable, safe environment. Now, I've never had the pleasure of trying mescaline; a friend of mine who's done an extreme dose of Mescaline, several pounds of san pedro, said he spent what felt like a thousand years in another reality. He says mescaline changes you forever, like 2 years after he's still different. He feels as if he has a guardian.
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: o n l i n e on March 24, 2008, 02:33:44 PM

I definately think LSD is great for introspection. But what if it is an external reality you want to attach yourself to? I tend to believe you'd prefer K-hole levels ketamine in a nice, comfortable, safe environment. Now, I've never had the pleasure of trying mescaline; a friend of mine who's done an extreme dose of Mescaline, several pounds of san pedro, said he spent what felt like a thousand years in another reality. He says mescaline changes you forever, like 2 years after he's still different. He feels as if he has a guardian.


A claim frequently heard about the San Pedro experience is that the user embarks on a flight of a telepathic nature being transported across time and space. A user who embarks on this "astral journey" may perceive events happening in distant parts of the world, or in metaphysical realms. This flight phenomenon, which I have not encountered in my experience with San Pedro, may result from solanaceous plants which are frequently included in the San Pedro brew and contain the Belladonna alkaloids.
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: e v e n on March 29, 2008, 12:57:58 AM

A claim frequently heard about the San Pedro experience is that the user embarks on a flight of a telepathic nature being transported across time and space. A user who embarks on this "astral journey" may perceive events happening in distant parts of the world, or in metaphysical realms. This flight phenomenon, which I have not encountered in my experience with San Pedro, may result from solanaceous plants which are frequently included in the San Pedro brew and contain the Belladonna alkaloids.


Correct me if I'm wrong, but remote viewing is the term it's usually used, isn't it?
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: CK on March 31, 2008, 05:20:00 PM
Interesting!
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: mucho on April 03, 2008, 08:57:28 AM

The real reason LSD needs to be illegal is not because it makes a tiny percentage of its users crazy, but because of what it does to the vast majority ... LSD does not attract non-conformists so much as it is creates them. One can not, for example, after a serious immersion in LSD, go back to the 9-to-5 world of sales managers and upward mobility. Better to work for yourself, doing something simple and useful, which was why so many hippies became entrepreneurs, farmers, craftspeople. For most, the psychedelic experience dealt a serious blow to their desire for power, and all those buttresses to the power urge that go by the name ambition. The man who comes back through the Door in the Wall will never be the same as the man who went out. He will be wiser but less cocksure, happier but less self satisfied, humbler in acknowledging his ignorance, yet better equipped to understand the relationship of words to things, of systematic reasoning to the unfathomable Mystery which it tries, forever vainly, to comprehend.

"Bad trips" on LSD result from the 11-hour forced introspection that the drug creates. Most cannot stand to look that closely at themselves, certainly not for that long. That's why Leary and company were getting complete cures of psychotics after five or six guided LSD trips, of course, before the government stepped in and outlawed the drug. Well, movie "The Passion of Christ," by Mel Gibson is like being on acid for two straight hours, only the subject isn't yourself, it is Jesus.

Dr. Timothy Leary, interviewed by Playboy, announced that LSD was the most powerful aphrodisiac ever discovered. "Let me put it this way," he said, "compared with sex under LSD, the way you have been making love -- no matter how ecstatic the pleasure you think you get from it – is like making love to a department-store-window dummy. "The three inevitable goals of the LSD session are to discover and make love with God, to discover and make love with yourself, and to discover and make love with a woman."


I definately think LSD is great for introspection. But what if it is an external reality you want to attach yourself to? I tend to believe you'd prefer K-hole levels ketamine in a nice, comfortable, safe environment. Now, I've never had the pleasure of trying mescaline; a friend of mine who's done an extreme dose of Mescaline, several pounds of san pedro, said he spent what felt like a thousand years in another reality. He says mescaline changes you forever, like 2 years after he's still different. He feels as if he has a guardian.


Indeed Alma! LSD is very useful for mediation. People often ask me whether my meditation practice has anything to do with my involvement in environmental work. In actuality, it was the same warm current that lead me from LSD to meditation, which then picked me up again and took me into the forest. My sense is that I'm not getting lost from the path. This is what I'm meant to be doing. Perhaps one day that current will pick me up and I'll start meditating again. I haven't lost confidence in the practice. I think I developed some qualities in mediation that are very useful in environmental work, such as being able to focus on the process rather than the goal.
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: becky on April 03, 2008, 12:34:37 PM

I definately think LSD is great for introspection. But what if it is an external reality you want to attach yourself to? I tend to believe you'd prefer K-hole levels ketamine in a nice, comfortable, safe environment. Now, I've never had the pleasure of trying mescaline; a friend of mine who's done an extreme dose of Mescaline, several pounds of san pedro, said he spent what felt like a thousand years in another reality. He says mescaline changes you forever, like 2 years after he's still different. He feels as if he has a guardian.


Good complementary stuff, Alma!
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: ismile on April 05, 2008, 02:04:57 PM

Indeed Alma! LSD is very useful for mediation. [...]

[...] developed some qualities in mediation that are very useful in environmental work, such as being able to focus on the process rather than the goal.


I am assuming in these two other cases you also meant meditation rather than mediation, did you not mucho?! :)
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: nolover on April 07, 2008, 03:21:35 PM

Ketanmine is a very promising drug for occasional use -- trippy almost like LSD, yet lasts only about 2 hours, which is good if you get a bad trip.


Interesting DunD!
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: o l i v e r on April 16, 2008, 08:41:39 AM
.
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: superpartner on April 16, 2008, 11:03:46 AM

A claim frequently heard about the San Pedro experience is that the user embarks on a flight of a telepathic nature being transported across time and space. A user who embarks on this "astral journey" may perceive events happening in distant parts of the world, or in metaphysical realms. This flight phenomenon, which I have not encountered in my experience with San Pedro, may result from solanaceous plants which are frequently included in the San Pedro brew and contain the Belladonna alkaloids.


Stanislav Grof feels the holographic paradigm offers a model for understanding many of the baffling phenomena experienced by individuals during altered states of consciousness. In the 1950s, while conducting research into the beliefs of LSD as a psychotherapeutic tool, Grof had one female patient who suddenly became convinced she had assumed the identity of a female of a species of prehistoric reptile. During the course of her hallucination, she not only gave a richly detailed description of what it felt like to be encapsuled in such a form, but noted that the portion of the male of the species's anatomy was a patch of colored scales on the side of its head. What was startling to Grof was that although the woman had no prior knowledge about such things, a conversation with a zoologist later confirmed that in certain species of reptiles colored areas on the head do indeed play an important role as triggers of sexual arousal. The woman's experience was not unique. During the course of his research, Grof encountered examples of patients regressing and identifying with virtually every species on the evolutionary tree (research findings which helped influence the man-into-ape scene in the movie Altered States). Moreover, he found that such experiences frequently contained obscure zoological details which turned out to be accurate.

Regressions into the animal kingdom were not the only puzzling psychological phenomena Grof encountered. He also had patients who appeared to tap into some sort of collective or racial unconscious. Individuals with little or no education suddenly gave detailed descriptions of Zoroastrian funerary practices and scenes from Hindu mythology. In other categories of experience, individuals gave persuasive accounts of out-of-body journeys, of precognitive glimpses of the future, of regressions into apparent past-life incarnations. In later research, Grof found the same range of phenomena manifested in therapy sessions which did not involve the use of drugs. Because the common element in such experiences appeared to be the transcending of an individual's consciousness beyond the usual boundaries of ego and/or limitations of space and time, Grof called such manifestations "transpersonal experiences", and in the late '60s he helped found a branch of psychology called "transpersonal psychology" devoted entirely to their study. Although Grof's newly founded Association of Transpersonal Psychology garnered a rapidly growing group of like-minded professionals and has become a respected branch of psychology, for years neither Grof or any of his colleagues were able to offer a mechanism for explaining the bizarre psychological phenomena they were witnessing. But that has changed with the advent of the holographic paradigm. As Grof recently noted, if the mind is actually part of a continuum, a labyrinth that is connected not only to every other mind that exists or has existed, but to every atom, organism, and region in the vastness of space and time itself, the fact that it is able to occasionally make forays into the labyrinth and have transpersonal experiences no longer seems so strange.

The holographic paradigm also has implications for so-called hard sciences like biology. Keith Floyd, a psychologist at Virginia Intermont College, has pointed out that if the concreteness of reality is but a holographic illusion, it would no longer be true to say the brain produces consciousness. Rather, it is consciousness that creates the appearance of the brain -- as well as the body and everything else around us we interpret as physical. Such a turnabout in the way we view biological structures has caused researchers to point out that medicine and our understanding of the healing process could also be transformed by the holographic paradigm. If the apparent physical structure of the body is but a holographic projection of consciousness, it becomes clear that each of us is much more responsible for our health than current medical wisdom allows. What we now view as miraculous remissions of disease may actually be due to changes in consciousness which in turn effect changes in the hologram of the body. Similarly, controversial new healing techniques such as visualization may work so well because, in the holographic domain of thought, images are ultimately as real as "reality".

Even visions and experiences involving "non-ordinary" reality become explainable under the holographic paradigm. In his book "Gifts of Unknown Things," biologist Lyall Watson describes his encounter with an Indonesian shaman woman who, by performing a ritual dance, was able to make an entire grove of trees instantly vanish into thin air. Watson relates that as he and another astonished onlooker continued to watch the woman, she caused the trees to reappear, then "click" off again and on again several times in succession. Although current scientific understanding is incapable of explaining such events, experiences like this become more tenable if "hard" reality is only a holographic projection. Perhaps we agree on what is "there" or "not there" because what we call consensus reality is formulated and ratified at the level of the human unconscious at which all minds are infinitely interconnected. If this is true, it is the most profound implication of the holographic paradigm of all, for it means that experiences such as Watson's are not commonplace only because we have not programmed our minds with the beliefs that would make them so. In a holographic universe there are no limits to the extent to which we can alter the fabric of reality.

What we perceive as reality is only a canvas waiting for us to draw upon it any picture we want. Anything is possible, from bending spoons with the power of the mind to the phantasmagoric events experienced by Castaneda during his encounters with the Yaqui brujo don Juan, for magic is our birthright, no more or less miraculous than our ability to compute the reality we want when we are in our dreams. Indeed, even our most fundamental notions about reality become suspect, for in a holographic universe, as Pribram has pointed out, even random events would have to be seen as based on holographic principles and therefore determined. Synchronicities or meaningful coincidences suddenly makes sense, and everything in reality would have to be seen as a metaphor, for even the most haphazard events would express some underlying symmetry. Whether Bohm and Pribram's holographic paradigm becomes accepted in science or dies an ignoble death remains to be seen, but it is safe to say that it has already had an influence on the thinking of many scientists. And even if it is found that the holographic model does not provide the best explanation for the instantaneous communications that seem to be passing back and forth between subatomic particles, at the very least, as noted by Basil Hiley, a physicist at Birbeck College in London, Aspect's findings "indicate that we must be prepared to consider radically new views of reality". 
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: slightlybehind on April 17, 2008, 08:25:56 AM

.


Tagging the thread, oliver? Or you just did not make it to post what you wanted to? Just curious, you know :)
Title: HA!
Post by: ex nihilo on April 21, 2008, 12:35:22 PM
(http://img368.imageshack.us/img368/8936/69254650499f59c13ayr2lr3.jpg)
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: spotonjane on April 24, 2008, 01:20:07 AM
45 minutes examples and explanations... 15 minutes air guitar.
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: R E M on May 05, 2008, 09:44:08 AM

If you're not gay, a druggie, a fag hag or a whore, don't even think about going to Crobar -- you'll be treated as a nuisance.
 

crobar appears to be like law school


LOL r e g g i e ;)


(http://www.wayfaring.info/wp-content/uploads/2007/06/bars-rimini.jpg)

I went last month to Rimini -- it's famous for its nightlife, and is known as the "Ibiza of the Adriatic." The city itself does not have any clubs, but many of its bars have dance floors that are frequently packed. The atmosphere is more geared to tourists and families -- however, the city is notable in disco music history for its Cosmic Club who's DJ Daniele Baldelli played records from a moving elevator to the young experimental audience. Baldelli's important contribution to the world of DJing is perhaps overshadowed by his American counterparts, Frankie Knuckles and Ron Hardy. You will find a large number of wine bars, pubs and creperies in the three small squares that stretch from the old fish market to the main street in the city. The zone is packed with the young people all year round and generally is the first stop on an evening out where they mix and invite each other to the discotheques later in the evening.
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: amantadine on May 05, 2008, 10:13:20 AM

(http://www.wayfaring.info/wp-content/uploads/2007/06/bars-rimini.jpg)

I went last month to Rimini -- it's famous for its nightlife, and is known as the "Ibiza of the Adriatic." The city itself does not have any clubs, but many of its bars have dance floors that are frequently packed. The atmosphere is more geared to tourists and families -- however, the city is notable in disco music history for its Cosmic Club who's DJ Daniele Baldelli played records from a moving elevator to the young experimental audience. Baldelli's important contribution to the world of DJing is perhaps overshadowed by his American counterparts, Frankie Knuckles and Ron Hardy. You will find a large number of wine bars, pubs and creperies in the three small squares that stretch from the old fish market to the main street in the city. The zone is packed with the young people all year round and generally is the first stop on an evening out where they mix and invite each other to the discotheques later in the evening.


Can you easily find X there?
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: Vigilance on May 06, 2008, 12:51:17 PM

Nothing beats LSD .. the insight you gain during the introspection of just one trip is worth years of self-exploring and soul-searching. Law school and lawyering, with its snobism, pretentiousness and fake arrogance, will seem funny to you afterwards ..


The real reason LSD needs to be illegal is not because it makes a tiny percentage of its users crazy, but because of what it does to the vast majority ... LSD does not attract non-conformists so much as it is creates them. One can not, for example, after a serious immersion in LSD, go back to the 9-to-5 world of sales managers and upward mobility. Better to work for yourself, doing something simple and useful, which was why so many hippies became entrepreneurs, farmers, craftspeople. For most, the psychedelic experience dealt a serious blow to their desire for power, and all those buttresses to the power urge that go by the name ambition. The man who comes back through the Door in the Wall will never be the same as the man who went out. He will be wiser but less cocksure, happier but less self satisfied, humbler in acknowledging his ignorance, yet better equipped to understand the relationship of words to things, of systematic reasoning to the unfathomable Mystery which it tries, forever vainly, to comprehend.

"Bad trips" on LSD result from the 11-hour forced introspection that the drug creates. Most cannot stand to look that closely at themselves, certainly not for that long. That's why Leary and company were getting complete cures of psychotics after five or six guided LSD trips, of course, before the government stepped in and outlawed the drug. Well, movie "The Passion of Christ," by Mel Gibson is like being on acid for two straight hours, only the subject isn't yourself, it is Jesus.

Dr. Timothy Leary, interviewed by Playboy, announced that LSD was the most powerful aphrodisiac ever discovered. "Let me put it this way," he said, "compared with sex under LSD, the way you have been making love -- no matter how ecstatic the pleasure you think you get from it – is like making love to a department-store-window dummy. "The three inevitable goals of the LSD session are to discover and make love with God, to discover and make love with yourself, and to discover and make love with a woman."


It looks like to me one's trying to keeping one's guard up, keeping one's distance, with their sharp edges hardened to resist being blunted and dulled by external influences... Adopting a boxer's stance when dealing with others... with toe drawing therir line of defense and battling all who dare to cross or go against them. With fists raised and determination coiled, waging their own war of independence against a do what you're told and one-size-fits-all world. Well, my friend, power is not in form but in nature.

In glassmaking there is a phenomena that occurs when a small glob of molten glass is rapidly cooled. The result is a solid, tadpole-shaped object with a bulbous head that tapers to a delicate curved tail. Despite their fragile look, Rupert's Drops seem indestructible. Direct sledgehammer blows glance off ineffectually. They were first introduced as toys in the 17th century to the court of King James I by his grandson, Prince Rupert of Bavaria. The real beauty of Rupert's Drops is not in their appearance or strength but in their nature. While seemingly indestructible, one clip or snip of delicate tail's tip explodes the Rupert's Drop into a powdery handful of harmless dust. It is the nature of Rupert's Drops, born of the rapid cooling of surface over warm interior, that accounts for their phenomena -- an explosive disintegration of form back to particle beginning.

You are born full-blown but spend much of your life by forcing others to understand you and accept you. Your function is to be more droplet of water, not ocean, for you've did-it-and-done all before. Nature is discovered in the tails of Rupert's Drops; in souls for you. Accepting that others may not ever approve or understand you, because they can't, is the snip of realization that explodes and disintegrates your defensiveness. Others, like glass, mature by the process of annealing. They take form under more evenly tempered conditions and require a slower, more steady pace for development. Through step-by-step guidance and experience, others bloom, grow, and ripen to self-realization: not you. You come with self-realization snugged into conscience. When you draw your lines of defiance and pen your lists of demands, you not only deny others access to you but limit yourself in terms of your person and purpose. Erasing that line that divides you and others frees you to be as born and meant.

Your power only reveals when you stop expecting and stop demanding confirmation of and for self. Once you accept that validation for you cannot be had externally, you lower your fists. Where once shrillness was heard and desperation felt, there is quiet and calmness instead. You hear but one voice and feel the fullness of your so-long felt but misunderstood and misused strength. Only from soul, through guidance of intuition and by way of emotions, you will receive all you need to be yourself and meet your responsibilities. Your fulfillment is experiencing, for you've already passed all possible life lessons. You are not here to serve self, but to help others BE their own selves fully.
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: labeta on May 06, 2008, 01:32:11 PM

Nothing beats LSD .. the insight you gain during the introspection of just one trip is worth years of self-exploring and soul-searching. Law school and lawyering, with its snobism, pretentiousness and fake arrogance, will seem funny to you afterwards ..


The real reason LSD needs to be illegal is not because it makes a tiny percentage of its users crazy, but because of what it does to the vast majority ... LSD does not attract non-conformists so much as it is creates them. One can not, for example, after a serious immersion in LSD, go back to the 9-to-5 world of sales managers and upward mobility. Better to work for yourself, doing something simple and useful, which was why so many hippies became entrepreneurs, farmers, craftspeople. For most, the psychedelic experience dealt a serious blow to their desire for power, and all those buttresses to the power urge that go by the name ambition. The man who comes back through the Door in the Wall will never be the same as the man who went out. He will be wiser but less cocksure, happier but less self satisfied, humbler in acknowledging his ignorance, yet better equipped to understand the relationship of words to things, of systematic reasoning to the unfathomable Mystery which it tries, forever vainly, to comprehend.

"Bad trips" on LSD result from the 11-hour forced introspection that the drug creates. Most cannot stand to look that closely at themselves, certainly not for that long. That's why Leary and company were getting complete cures of psychotics after five or six guided LSD trips, of course, before the government stepped in and outlawed the drug. Well, movie "The Passion of Christ," by Mel Gibson is like being on acid for two straight hours, only the subject isn't yourself, it is Jesus.

Dr. Timothy Leary, interviewed by Playboy, announced that LSD was the most powerful aphrodisiac ever discovered. "Let me put it this way," he said, "compared with sex under LSD, the way you have been making love -- no matter how ecstatic the pleasure you think you get from it – is like making love to a department-store-window dummy. "The three inevitable goals of the LSD session are to discover and make love with God, to discover and make love with yourself, and to discover and make love with a woman."


It looks like to me one's trying to keeping one's guard up, keeping one's distance, with their sharp edges hardened to resist being blunted and dulled by external influences... Adopting a boxer's stance when dealing with others... with toe drawing therir line of defense and battling all who dare to cross or go against them. With fists raised and determination coiled, waging their own war of independence against a do what you're told and one-size-fits-all world. Well, my friend, power is not in form but in nature.

In glassmaking there is a phenomena that occurs when a small glob of molten glass is rapidly cooled. The result is a solid, tadpole-shaped object with a bulbous head that tapers to a delicate curved tail. Despite their fragile look, Rupert's Drops seem indestructible. Direct sledgehammer blows glance off ineffectually. They were first introduced as toys in the 17th century to the court of King James I by his grandson, Prince Rupert of Bavaria. The real beauty of Rupert's Drops is not in their appearance or strength but in their nature. While seemingly indestructible, one clip or snip of delicate tail's tip explodes the Rupert's Drop into a powdery handful of harmless dust. It is the nature of Rupert's Drops, born of the rapid cooling of surface over warm interior, that accounts for their phenomena -- an explosive disintegration of form back to particle beginning.

You are born full-blown but spend much of your life by forcing others to understand you and accept you. Your function is to be more droplet of water, not ocean, for you've did-it-and-done all before. Nature is discovered in the tails of Rupert's Drops; in souls for you. Accepting that others may not ever approve or understand you, because they can't, is the snip of realization that explodes and disintegrates your defensiveness. Others, like glass, mature by the process of annealing. They take form under more evenly tempered conditions and require a slower, more steady pace for development. Through step-by-step guidance and experience, others bloom, grow, and ripen to self-realization: not you. You come with self-realization snugged into conscience. When you draw your lines of defiance and pen your lists of demands, you not only deny others access to you but limit yourself in terms of your person and purpose. Erasing that line that divides you and others frees you to be as born and meant.

Your power only reveals when you stop expecting and stop demanding confirmation of and for self. Once you accept that validation for you cannot be had externally, you lower your fists. Where once shrillness was heard and desperation felt, there is quiet and calmness instead. You hear but one voice and feel the fullness of your so-long felt but misunderstood and misused strength. Only from soul, through guidance of intuition and by way of emotions, you will receive all you need to be yourself and meet your responsibilities. Your fulfillment is experiencing, for you've already passed all possible life lessons. You are not here to serve self, but to help others BE their own selves fully.


My God, Vigilance, this is simply beautiful -- I just could not help crying, literally! I don't care if you're a man or a woman, I love you!
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: like on May 11, 2008, 12:10:21 PM
Here's some paper towel for you, labeta!

I agree, it is really cool! 
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: schrödinger on May 13, 2008, 11:07:44 AM

[...]

In glassmaking there is a phenomena that occurs when a small glob of molten glass is rapidly cooled. The result is a solid, tadpole-shaped object with a bulbous head that tapers to a delicate curved tail. Despite their fragile look, Rupert's Drops seem indestructible. Direct sledgehammer blows glance off ineffectually. They were first introduced as toys in the 17th century to the court of King James I by his grandson, Prince Rupert of Bavaria. The real beauty of Rupert's Drops is not in their appearance or strength but in their nature. While seemingly indestructible, one clip or snip of delicate tail's tip explodes the Rupert's Drop into a powdery handful of harmless dust. It is the nature of Rupert's Drops, born of the rapid cooling of surface over warm interior, that accounts for their phenomena -- an explosive disintegration of form back to particle beginning.

You are born full-blown but spend much of your life by forcing others to understand you and accept you. Your function is to be more droplet of water, not ocean, for you've did-it-and-done all before. Nature is discovered in the tails of Rupert's Drops; in souls for you. [...]


(http://img380.imageshack.us/img380/4176/33389510qm6.jpg)

droplet of water, not ocean... hmmm... If you cut a hologram in half, each half contains whole views of the entire holographic image. The same is true if you cut out a small piece -­- even a tiny fragment will still contain the whole picture. On top of that, if you make a hologram of a magnifying glass, the holographic version will magnify the other objects in the hologram, just like a real one.

(http://img380.imageshack.us/img380/4416/hologram5ur8.jpg)
The famous hologram "The Kiss" shows a sequence of similar, stationary images. Your eye sees many frames simultaneously, and your brain interprets them as moving images.
 
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: nmla on May 27, 2008, 11:47:33 AM

That's not the point, cen! As each is a self-scripted star in their life story, each also has the power and freedom to pen their own demise. Living according to individual truth considerably reduces the possibility to self-defeat becoming a pattern moment-to-moment, year-to-year, and life-to-life. Not only must WHAT to do and WHY to do be self-determined, but HOW and WHEN too. Individual feelings are the only motivator and motivation that inflames and sustains drive, and returns rewards that are personally meaningful and, therefore, more confidence-building than money and applause.


People become wrapped up all the time in fighting for some terribly idealistic cause that has little chance of succeeding or of giving them any real satisfaction. All that they can count on is that they will be required to surrender their individuality for a "higher purpose," which usually turns out to be someone else's ego.

And there is a lesson to be learned here. The more they identify with what they do rather than what they are, the more difficulties they'll have. They are not what they do. If they confront that issue they will learn to handle their life much more successfully because they will not always have to protect themselves.
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: hi gene on May 30, 2008, 03:27:22 PM

(http://www.wayfaring.info/wp-content/uploads/2007/06/bars-rimini.jpg)

I went last month to Rimini -- it's famous for its nightlife, and is known as the "Ibiza of the Adriatic." The city itself does not have any clubs, but many of its bars have dance floors that are frequently packed. The atmosphere is more geared to tourists and families -- however, the city is notable in disco music history for its Cosmic Club who's DJ Daniele Baldelli played records from a moving elevator to the young experimental audience. Baldelli's important contribution to the world of DJing is perhaps overshadowed by his American counterparts, Frankie Knuckles and Ron Hardy. You will find a large number of wine bars, pubs and creperies in the three small squares that stretch from the old fish market to the main street in the city. The zone is packed with the young people all year round and generally is the first stop on an evening out where they mix and invite each other to the discotheques later in the evening.


Hahaha, amanta, I know what you mean ;)
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: Em Woods on May 30, 2008, 05:07:36 PM
During undergrad at least I liked to look for motivational quotes and put them up. Unfortch, this was often done while I should have been actually studying.
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: STATA on May 31, 2008, 01:38:43 PM

(http://img380.imageshack.us/img380/4416/hologram5ur8.jpg)
The famous hologram "The Kiss" shows a sequence of similar, stationary images. Your eye sees many frames simultaneously, and your brain interprets them as moving images.
 

LOL schrodinger, you're so funny ;)
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: T a s h on June 02, 2008, 01:56:53 PM

Does Objective Reality Exist, or is the Universe a Phantasm?

In 1982 a remarkable event took place. At the University of Paris a research team led by physicist Alain Aspect performed what may turn out to be one of the most important experiments of the 20th century. You did not hear about it on the evening news. In fact, unless you are in the habit of reading scientific journals you probably have never even heard Aspect's name, though there are some who believe his discovery may change the face of science. Aspect and his team discovered that under certain circumstances subatomic particles such as electrons are able to instantaneously communicate with each other regardless of the distance separating them. It doesn't matter whether they are 10 feet or 10 billion miles apart.Somehow each particle always seems to know what the other is doing. The problem with this feat is that it violates Einstein's long-held tenet that no communication can travel faster than the speed of light. Since traveling faster than the speed of light is tantamount to breaking the time barrier, this daunting prospect has caused some physicists to try to come up with elaborate ways to explain away Aspect's findings. But it has inspired others to offer even more radical explanations.

University of London physicist David Bohm, for example, believes Aspect's findings imply that objective reality does not exist, that despite its apparent solidity the universe is at heart a phantasm, a gigantic and splendidly detailed hologram. A hologram is a three- dimensional photograph made with the aid of a laser. To make a hologram, the object to be photographed is first bathed in the light of a laser beam. Then a second laser beam is bounced off the reflected light of the first and the resulting interference pattern (the area where the two laser beams commingle) is captured on film. When the film is developed, it looks like a meaningless swirl of light and dark lines. But as soon as the developed film is illuminated by another laser beam, a three-dimensional image of the original object appears. The three-dimensionality of such images is not the only remarkable characteristic of holograms. If a hologram of a rose is cut in half and then illuminated by a laser, each half will still be found to contain the entire image of the rose. Indeed, even if the halves are divided again, each snippet of film will always be found to contain a smaller but intact version of the original image. Unlike normal photographs, every part of a hologram contains all the information possessed by the whole.

The "whole in every part" nature of a hologram provides us with an entirely new way of understanding organization and order. For most of its history, Western science has labored under the bias that the best way to understand a physical phenomenon, whether a frog or an atom, is to dissect it and study its respective parts. A hologram teaches us that some things in the universe may not lend themselves to this approach. If we try to take apart something constructed holographically, we will not get the pieces of which it is made, we will only get smaller wholes. This insight suggested to Bohm another way of understanding Aspect's discovery. Bohm believes the reason subatomic particles are able to remain in contact with one another regardless of the distance separating them is not because they are sending some sort of mysterious signal back and forth, but because their separateness is an illusion. He argues that at some deeper level of reality such particles are not individual entities, but are actually extensions of the same fundamental something. To enable people to better visualize what he means, Bohm offers the following illustration. Imagine an aquarium containing a fish. Imagine also that you are unable to see the aquarium directly and your knowledge about it and what it contains comes from two television cameras, one directed at the aquarium's front and the other directed at its side. As you stare at the two television monitors, you might assume that the fish on each of the screens are separate entities. After all, because the cameras are set at different angles, each of the images will be slightly different. But as you continue to watch the two fish, you will eventually become aware that there is a certain relationship between them. When one turns, the other also makes a slightly different but corresponding turn; when one faces the front, the other always faces toward the side. If you remain unaware of the full scope of the situation, you might even conclude that the fish must be instantaneously communicating with one another, but this is clearly not the case.

This, says Bohm, is precisely what is going on between the subatomic particles in Aspect's experiment. According to Bohm, the apparent faster-than-light connection between subatomic particles is really telling us that there is a deeper level of reality we are not privy to, a more complex dimension beyond our own that is analogous to the aquarium. And, he adds, we view objects such as subatomic particles as separate from one another because we are seeing only a portion of their reality. Such particles are not separate "parts", but facets of a deeper and more underlying unity that is ultimately as holographic and indivisible as the previously mentioned rose. And since everything in physical reality is comprised of these "eidolons", the universe is itself a projection, a hologram. In addition to its phantomlike nature, such a universe would possess other rather startling features. If the apparent separateness of subatomic particles is illusory, it means that at a deeper level of reality all things in the universe are infinitely interconnected. The electrons in a carbon atom in the human brain are connected to the subatomic particles that comprise every salmon that swims, every heart that beats, and every star that shimmers in the sky. Everything interpenetrates everything, and although human nature may seek to categorize and pigeonhole and subdivide, the various phenomena of the universe, all apportionments are of necessity artificial and all of nature is ultimately a seamless web.

In a holographic universe, even time and space could no longer be viewed as fundamentals. Because concepts such as location break down in a universe in which nothing is truly separate from anything else, time and three-dimensional space, like the images of the fish on the TV monitors, would also have to be viewed as projections of this deeper order. At its deeper level reality is a sort of superhologram in which the past, present, and future all exist simultaneously. This suggests that given the proper tools it might even be possible to someday reach into the superholographic level of reality and pluck out scenes from the long-forgotten past. What else the superhologram contains is an open-ended question. Allowing, for the sake of argument, that the superhologram is the matrix that has given birth to everything in our universe, at the very least it contains every subatomic particle that has been or will be -- every configuration of matter and energy that is possible, from snowflakes to quasars, from blue whales to gamma rays. It must be seen as a sort of cosmic storehouse of "All That Is."
Although Bohm concedes that we have no way of knowing what else might lie hidden in the superhologram, he does venture to say that we have no reason to assume it does not contain more. Or as he puts it, perhaps the superholographic level of reality is a "mere stage" beyond which lies "an infinity of further development".


In Fyodor Dostoevsky's "Notes from Underground," the protagonist implicitly supports the idea of 2 plus 2 making 5, spending several paragraphs considering the implications of rejecting the statement "2 times 2 makes 4." His purpose is not ideological, however. Instead, he proposes that it is the free will to choose or reject the logical as well as the illogical that makes mankind human. He adds: "I admit that two times two makes four is an excellent thing, but if we are to give everything its due, two times two makes five is sometimes a very charming thing too."

Dostoevsky was writing in 1864. However, according to Roderick T. Long, Victor Hugo had used the phrase back in 1852. He objected to the way in which the vast majority of French voters had backed Napoleon III, endorsing the way liberal values had been ignored in Napoleon III's coup. Victor Hugo said "Now, get 7,500,000 votes to declare that 2 and 2 make 5, that the straight line is the longest road, that the whole is less than its part; get it declared by 8 millions, by 10 millions, by a 100 millions of votes, you will not have advanced a step." It's very plausible that Dostoevsky had this in mind. He had been sentenced to death for his participation in a radical intellectual discussion group. The sentence was commuted to imprisonment in Siberia, and he then changed his opinions to something that doesn't fit any conventional labels.
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: buyram on June 13, 2008, 12:50:07 PM
Quote

I went last month to Rimini -- it's famous for its nightlife, and is known as the "Ibiza of the Adriatic." [...]


Hahaha, amanta, I know what you mean ;)
 

Of course you do -- he means the "Ibiza of My A s s"!
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: b e s a m e on June 25, 2008, 02:31:52 PM
Have you been in Rimini, buyram?
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: ouffha on June 26, 2008, 02:04:55 AM
Have you been in Rimini, buyram?

Lea Rimini? from King of Queens?
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: we are watching you on July 02, 2008, 11:03:20 AM
Great thread!
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: QIR on July 19, 2008, 04:56:07 PM

In Fyodor Dostoevsky's "Notes from Underground," the protagonist implicitly supports the idea of 2 plus 2 making 5, spending several paragraphs considering the implications of rejecting the statement "2 times 2 makes 4." His purpose is not ideological, however. Instead, he proposes that it is the free will to choose or reject the logical as well as the illogical that makes mankind human. He adds: "I admit that 2 times 2 makes 4 is an excellent thing, but if we are to give everything its due, 2 times 2 makes 5 is sometimes a very charming thing too."

Dostoevsky was writing in 1864. However, according to Roderick T. Long, Victor Hugo had used the phrase back in 1852. He objected to the way in which the vast majority of French voters had backed Napoleon III, endorsing the way liberal values had been ignored in Napoleon III's coup. Victor Hugo said "Now, get 7,500,000 votes to declare that 2 and 2 make 5, that the straight line is the longest road, that the whole is less than its part; get it declared by 8 millions, by 10 millions, by a 100 millions of votes, you will not have advanced a step." It's very plausible that Dostoevsky had this in mind. [...]


He might well have had that in mind...
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: schel on July 30, 2008, 11:00:36 AM
Hahaha QIR ;)
Title: Suspect Zero
Post by: pregap on August 11, 2008, 11:18:59 AM

A claim frequently heard about the San Pedro experience is that the user embarks on a flight of a telepathic nature being transported across time and space. A user who embarks on this "astral journey" may perceive events happening in distant parts of the world, or in metaphysical realms. This flight phenomenon, which I have not encountered in my experience with San Pedro, may result from solanaceous plants which are frequently included in the San Pedro brew and contain the Belladonna alkaloids.


Correct me if I'm wrong, but remote viewing is the term it's usually used, isn't it?


(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/a/a4/Suspect_Zero_poster.jpg)

Suspect Zero is a 2004 thriller, directed by E. Elias Merhige. It opened to decidedly mixed reviews, and failed to earn back half of its estimated $27 million production costs at the box office. It has also been criticized to have a similar ending as the movie Se7en.

FBI Agent Thomas Mackelway (Aaron Eckhart) and Agent Fran Kulok (Carrie-Anne Moss) are put on the trail of Ben O'Ryan (Ben Kingsley), a serial killer who exclusively targets other serial killers. As the investigation proceeds, the agents begin to become aware of the possible existence of Suspect Zero, a mythical "super serial killer" responsible for hundreds of deaths across all 50 States who leaves no evidence behind to link his crimes together. The agents must decide if O'Ryan is the key that will allow them to catch Suspect Zero, or if he is Suspect Zero himself. As it turns out, O'Ryan was part of a secret government experiment attempting to cultivate telepathic abilities in individuals for military purposes. The experiments gave O'Ryan the ability to see the actions of serial killers. These disturbing visions constantly torment O'Ryan, and drive him to find the killers and kill them. O'Ryan seeks out Mackelway because Mackelway shares his abilities to some degree and was involved in a controversial case that made headlines. O'Ryan hunts down Suspect Zero, whose child victims are giving O'Ryan even more nightmares.

The actual "Suspect Zero" is a mentally sick man who travels over the United States with a truck. He targets children, which he kidnaps and transports to his ranch to be killed. Eventually, Mackelway and O'Ryan find Suspect Zero at his ranch. After a struggle outside, Suspect Zero is killed by a rock from Mackelway. O'Ryan is then shot by Kulok who believes O'Ryan is trying to harm Mackelway but instead is trying to fulfill the prophecy which was foreseen earlier in the film. A major theme of the film is remote viewing, and the DVD's extra features include interviews with people who worked with the US military and intelligence agencies as part of those programs.
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: Kore on August 14, 2008, 11:48:49 PM

If you're not gay, a druggie, a fag hag or a whore, don't even think about going to Crobar -- you'll be treated as a nuisance.
 

crobar appears to be like law school


LOL r e g g i e ;)


When this niteclub closed in New york city an entire crowd of clubbers got relieved - that's how horrible the environment was..
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: shell oil on August 15, 2008, 12:07:27 PM

When this niteclub closed in New york city an entire crowd of clubbers got relieved - that's how horrible the environment was..


Great username, Kore! Correct me if I'm wrong, but here it is my understanding of the Kore archetypes. Kore is the Greek word for "virgin." In ancient Greek culture, virgin meant a woman who had not yet given birth, not the Christian meaning of a woman who had not yet had sex. The Greeks believed there were three basic Kore archetypes: Kore Persephone, Kore Athena, and Kore Artemis.

Kore Persephone was the "young maiden," a girl who was Kore because of youth. Persephone is said to have a younger counterpart to herself -- Kore -- another name for the young Persephone. Psychologically, this may be a representation of two or three levels of this archetype: Kore, the Maiden, Persephone (or Demeter), the mature Woman, and Hecate, the Wise Crone.

Kore Athena was the career woman, who remained Kore because of dedication to some craft-based business.

Kore Artemis was the "wild woman," who remained Kore because she was a lesbian.

It is through the Greek influences of Artemis that Dianic Witchcraft became associated with lesbianism. At this time many lesbian Dianic rituals came into being.
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: small talk on August 28, 2008, 07:29:39 PM

Holding the Tensions

Carl Jung gave the image of the alchemical vessel in which processes of sublimation and purification take place. Psychotherapy provides this same kind of containment whereby tensions and paradoxes are charged with energy until they give way to active transformation. Even nuclear fusion requires the hot plasma to be contained long enough for fusion reactions to take place. The same is true of scientific and philosophical ideas. David Bohm regretted the speed with which Neils Bohr tried to resolve the tensions inherent in quantum theory. Within a year of Heisenberg's discovery of matrix mechanics Schrodinger produced his wave equation and Bohr and others quickly demonstrated the mathematical equivalence of the two approaches. Yet both approaches do subtly different things - Heisenberg's matrix mechanics, for example, makes no reference to an underlying or background space. If only the two approaches could have been held in tension, emphasizing both their similarities and differences, Bohm argued, then it may have been possible to develop a much deeper theory, one that transcended conventional notions of space-time and allowed for an intimate connection with relativity.

A similar tension exists today between scientific approaches to "consciousness theory" (in which the origin of mind is attributed to objective structures and processes within the brain - albeit some of them being quite novel, such as Penrose's notions of the gravitational collapse of the wave function) and our subjective experiences of consciousness, rare moments of transcendence and those inexplicable occurrences in which the irrational breaks through in dreams, synchronicities, etc. Then there are other phenomena which seem to have a foot in both camps, these include Jung's psychoid which is neither matter nor mind and both, the aforementioned synchronicities and phenomena such as projective identification. Rather than seeking a quick resolution between the subjective and objective it is valuable to hold on to the differences and paradoxes and use them as pointers to something deeper. Now that psychology has discovered the objective within consciousness (Jung's collective unconscious) so too physics must discover the subjective in matter; in fact, physics must come to terms with "the irrational in matter". Science is producing ever more delicate information about processes within the brain. Openness to Eastern meditative traditions brings with it alternative theories of consciousness and subtle matter. Transpersonal psychology addresses the idea of collective mind. Quantum theory and chaos theory help to loosen the appeal of traditional mechanistic theories and reductionistic approaches and, in the process, providing us with new metaphors. Nevertheless we are still victim to over two hundred years of mechanistic thinking and we work within a language that reflects and supports such a world view. As soon as we speak about mind and consciousness we find ourselves talking about objects, concepts, things, localization in space, separation and movement in time. Yet both quantum theory and Eastern psychology point to timelessness, active process and the ultimate illusion of the personal observer. It is very difficult for us, even now, to fully embrace the quantum paradigm, even the mathematics of quantum theory is still (paradoxically) expressed using space-time coordinates when the same theory predicts the break down of space-time structure. And time itself, as Prigogine points out, has never treated correctly in physics. Up to now it has been used more as an ordering parameter 't', and conveys nothing of the dynamics in which being gives way to becoming.

Locality and Beyond

The central question is: What is it that exists independent of the physical brain? Yet as soon as we attempt to formulate this questions we prejudice the answer through our linguistic concepts of object, location in space and so on. Current "consciousness studies" in the hard sciences assume that mind, or consciousness, emerges out of the physical brain and cannot therefore exist independent of it - although a variety of physical signals can be sent between brains. Our experience of consciousness awareness - scanning the environment and having access to our memories - is certainly conditioned by the state of the physical brain. But to suggest that brain is the sole cause of mind does not logically follow. Consciousness studies also argue in favour of some sort of quantum mechanical origin for consciousness. In its barest form it proposes that the sort of things done by consciousness (Penrose picks out mathematics) cannot all be reduced to algorithmic processes and therefore mind does not have a mechanical basis. While parts of it may be hard wired it does not totally operate like a computer. Quantum theory, the argument goes, is the other thing that cannot be reduced to algorithmic form. Ergo quantum theory must have something to do with consciousness. From there researchers rush on to theories of quantum tunneling, collapsing wave functions, non-local connections and coherent quantum structures. But a variety of other explanations are possible:

- That mind was present in the universe ab inito. For example, in the form of a proto mind associated with even the elementary particles.

- That mind is of a totally different order and makes its liaison with matter via the medium of the brain (The dualism of Popper and Eccles).

- That both mind and matter (at the quantum level) arise out of some deeper level.

- Or, to follow Bohm, that mind and matter form an unanalyzable whole which must be addressed through some totally different order of explanation - the Implicate Order. In this case the Cartesian cut is an illusion present only at the Explicate Order of perception and explanation.


(http://img373.imageshack.us/img373/7676/chaos1ny7.gif)
Subatomic particles that are separated in space and time behave as if they 'know' about each other. Archie Roy describes the attempts of physicist David Bohm to account for this profound unity of the world - a unity that might explain the paranormal.

Most of us have had the experience of standing on a bridge, watching a rain-swollen river slip by beneath, its surface deceptively calm. Only the occasional eddy reveals the vicious undertow of unseen currents.

On the Sun's surface, 'eddies' immensely greater, often as large as the Earth itself, are often visible. These sunspots, regions of swirling gas thousands of degrees cooler than the rest of the Sun's surface, move with the Sun's rotation. They travel in pairs, the members of a pair being termed the 'leader' and the 'follower'. Study of their light shows that each spot has a magnetic field. And even though they may be thousands of miles apart, if the leader has north magnetic polarity, the follower invariably has south magnetic plarity, and vice versa. How does the follower 'know' the polarity of the leader so that it can 'decide' to be of opposite polarity?

(http://img84.imageshack.us/img84/6687/chaos2re5.gif)
The unseen bond between sunspots. A vortex forms beneath the Sun's surface, generating a magnetic field with jumbled lines of force. The field lines 'float' to the surface, dragging the vortex with them. Where they break through, two sunspots of opposite polarities form, bound together by the field.

This question is extremely easy to answer. If we could delve deep into the Sun - that is, add a third dimension to our appreciation of the problem - wc would discover that each member of a sunspot pair is a 'broken end' formed when a twisting, rope-like vortex of gas is forced upwards from the Sun's depths and 'snaps' at the surface. The two sunspots therefore rotate, in opposite directions. Since this rotation causes thc magnetic field, the spots display opposite magnetic polarities. The connection between the sunspots is easily explained. But quantum mechanics suggests a large-scale interconnection among particles in the Universe that is not so easy to understand. The problem is shown in an acute form in a famous paradox presented by Albert Einstein with two collaborators, Nathan Rosen and Boris Podoisky, in 1935. It states an inescapable conclusion of quantum mechanics that seems outrageously incompatible with the theory of relativity and the belief that the velocity of light is a maximum limiting velocity for everything. Suppose an electron and its anti-particle, a positron collide with each other. They vanish and are converted into pure energy - two photons, which fly apart like shrapnel from an exploding grenade. In subsequent measurements the two photons are found to have opposite 'polarisations'. To understand polarisation, it is necessary to use the wave 'picture' of light.
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: small talk on August 28, 2008, 07:36:05 PM
Light is said to be polarised when its waves all lie in one plane: thus a light beam travelling horizontally could be polarised so that its vibrations were all vertical. Alternatively, it could be polarised so that its vibrations were all horizontal, or at any orientation between these. (Ordinarily, light is unpolarised: its vibrations can lie at any orientation around the beam.) Each photon travelling away from the mutual annihilation of the electron and positron can have any polarisation at all - but the other photon is then certain to be polarised at right angles to it. So by measuring the polarisation of one, we can predict the result of a measurement on the other. The question asked by Einstein, Podolsky and Rosen can be put in these terms: why do polarisation measurements always produce corresponding results? Does some unknown influence - a 'signal' - travel from one to the other to produce agreement?

Such a question may seem as naive as the question asked earlier about the magnetic polarities of the sunspot pair. Surely, it may be said, the polarisations of the two photons are fixed at the moment of the electron-positron annihilation, and remain the same thereafter. There is no need for a 'signal': the measuring instruments are merely discovering a pre-existing correlation. But according to the standard interpretation of quantum mechanics, this is precisely what is not happening. The photons cannot be said to be in a definite state of polarisation before the measurement. The polarisation is 'potential' rather than actual:   this is related to the fact that the results of quantum-mechanical measurements are not fixed in advance - there is only a certain probability of a given result occurring. Yet if each photon cannot be said to have a given state of polarisation before the measurement, how can the measurements at different places give correlated results?

An argument similar to this was used by Einstein and his collaborators as a weapon against the standard interpretation of quantum mechanics. They argued that quantum mechanics was fundamentally incomplete. Behind the properties physicists measure, such as polarisation, lie further, unknown properties, called 'hidden variables'. Variations in these 'hidden' properties would explain the variable results obtained in the polarisation measurements. But Einstein's arguments were not accepted by the majority of physicists. And subsequent work by theorists has shown that, if the experimental results predicted by quantum mechanics are correct - and experiments are continuing to yield evidence of their correctness - and if hidden variables exist, then they behave very curiously indeed. In the electron-positron annihilation experiment, we could imagine a measurement on one of the photons sending some unknown kind of 'signal' that would influence the other photon - just as our 'naive' questioner supposed. These 'signals' would travel faster than light in some cases.

(http://img297.imageshack.us/img297/2783/chaos3gi8.gif)
The paradox of Einstein, Podolsky and Rosen. An electron and its anti-particle, a positron, collide and are converted into two photons travelling apart. Each meets a polarisation analyser, which acts like Polaroid sunglasses: it blocks photons polarised at the 'wrong' angle. According to the usual interpretation, the photon now 'jumps' into a definite polarisation state, and is either passed or blocked by the analyser. The other photon, even though it may he extremely remote, also 'jumps' into a corresponding state, with a polarisation at right angles to that of the first .How does this correlation occur?

It is more likely that, as Niels Bohr argued in 1935, our common-sense way of viewing such experiments is at fault. Our tendency to split the experimental situation into independent quantities, such as the measuring instruments and the photons, and thinking of them as being localised in space and time, is a legacy from classical physics. Such a way of thinking is inadequate. Bohr went so far as to say: 'There are fundamental limitations met with in atomic physics, on the objective existence of phenomena independent of their means of observation.' This view seems to imply that the observer and his decisions play an integral part in actualising, or at least influencing, the Universe he observes; that in some deeper way the observer's measurements, the particles and the apparatus are all related and indivisible.

In Wholeness and the implicate order, published in 1980, David Bohm, professor of theoretical physics at Birkbeck College, London, describes a theory of quantum physics that treats such matters in an illuminatingly fresh, if controversial, way. The book is not easy to read, for it is dense with technical terms, often inadequately defined. But it should certainly be studied by anyone interested in theoretical physics and the nature of the connection between matter and consciousness. Bohm argues that, although our separation of the world into a large number of seemingly autonomous objects has worked admirably in the development of our understanding and control of our environment, such a division is seen on a deeper level to be false. He puts forward reasons for believing that the level of reality manifesting itself, the level that we study, is produced by the creative, flowing processes of a subworld. Objects and patterns are briefly thrown up, like the forms fleetingly seen in clouds. They seem to have a certain stability, exist for longer and shorter durations, and can be described by laws based on observation. But because they are manifested, or projected, from a deeper, more fundamental world of dynamic processes, certain anomalies or paradoxes occur. They reveal that, however deeply we believe we have come to grips with ultimate reality, the artefacts we are studying are, as it were, projections into a lower number of dimensions from a higher-dimensional realm.

Bohm gives the rough analogy of a man watching two television sets, each showing the view transmitted from one of two cameras focused on a fish-tank. If the cameras focus through different walls of the tank, the two scenes watched by the man will be completely different. Nevertheless he will in time see a certain relationship between the images, a decided correlation of behaviour of the fish on one screen with that of the fish on the other. If he did not understand that the screens show two-dimensional aspects of an overriding three-dimensional reality, he might find the correlation puzzling and paradoxical. Bohm looks upon the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradox and other aspects of quantum mechanics as hinting at this deeper, 'implicit' world.
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: small talk on August 28, 2008, 07:42:06 PM
(http://img297.imageshack.us/img297/9926/chaos4pt3.gif)
An analogy for Bohm's 'implicate order'. We notice correlations among widely separated events (represented by the apparently unconnected television pictures) and deduce that they represent aspects of a single underlying reality, or implicate order (the three-dimensional scene in the studio). We cannot study the implicate order directly, just as the viewer knows nothing directly about the studio


He also points out that we should expect non-local, non-causal relationships between observed elements if these are projections of a higher-dimensional reality. One is reminded forcibly of the principle of acausal synchronicity formulated by Carl Jung and Wolfgang Pauli to describe the seemingly meaningful coincidences that occur in people's lives from time to time with such arresting force. By no stretch of the imagination are their elements connected by cause and effect and so, however striking an effect they produce on their observers, they are dismissed glibly as 'mere coincidences'.' It may be that, like paradoxes, they should spur our minds to take fresh and original views of reality. Bohm makes a courageous attempt to include mental events in his theory. The sequence of notes that we hear when listening to music is the 'explicit' aspect of the piece. When we understand the music sufficiently to grasp it 'in its wholeness', we are grasping its 'implicit' order. Mozart said that his compositions came to him as a whole, and he simply had to write them out. Bohm regards this as showing an intuitive grasp of an implicit order that could only be conveyed to others through the explicit ordering of the music.

Similarly he contrasts a thinker's understanding of a logical or mathematical problem to the sequence of steps by which he conveys his understanding to others. The field of mental phenomena, however, is made explicit to us in a manner so different from that in which material entities are made manifest that we have traditionally held them to be completely separate, displaying such completely different natures that we have puzzled for millennia over such problems as how mind and matter could ever interact. It is thought-provoking to apply Bohm' s ideas concerning the transience of objects and the relationships among them to the world of human personality, of the conscious and unconscious minds. Does his theory make more comprehensible the interaction between individual minds and the deeper, more permanent world of the archetypes and the collective unconscious itself? Bohm is noncommittal, but believes that such problems, and the problems of the paranormal, are more likely to find a solution within the framework of his ideas than they ever could in classical science.

Paranormal phenomena abound with paradoxes, those painful spurs to human thought. Telepathy and clairvoyance treat space with contempt. Precognitions seem to make nonsense of our most cherished conviction that cause always precedeseffect, undermining our belief in time's orderliness. Such seeming paradoxes, like the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradox, may be messages to us, drawing our attention to hidden realities. Careful study of the paranormal will guide us in uncovering, mapping and partially understanding such realms. We have achieved the simple things, such as mastering flight, tapping and controlling atomic energy and sending members of our species to the Moon. In the paranormal we are facing the greatest challenge yet to our intellects. We should not expect to make fast progress, for we are entering areas yet more alien than quantum mechanics to everyday common-sense concepts. But we have plenty of time, if only we do not let our own stupidity wipe us from the face of our planet. In our uncertain world, the elusive phenomena of the paranormal are whispers of encouragement, glimpses of human personality beyond the physical and ephemeral.
Title: Major drug scandal hits Marine base
Post by: in lieu of on August 29, 2008, 06:27:16 PM

Discussing your penis in court doesn’t stay funny for long

(http://www.lacitybeat.com/site_images_upload/legacy/media/133/babylon_story.gif)

On the morning of his 42nd birthday, Stephen Harrell was arrested outside a liquor store on Century Boulevard in Inglewood, handcuffed, and hauled off to face the screwiest charge ever leveled at him in his admittedly checkered career with the criminal justice system. He was accused of concealing four rocks of cocaine in his foreskin. To be more precise, he was accused of wrapping the rocks in individual clear plastic bags, placing them all in another black bag, shoving them halfway up his penis and then keeping them snugly in place for at least an hour between the time of his arrest and the time that three Inglewood cops strip-searched him. The whole package was variously described by the arresting officer as being "bigger than a marble" and having roughly the same diameter as a dime.

Let me point out to those of you unendowed with male genitalia that we are talking about an almost unfathomable world of pain here, not to mention physical elasticity of a truly extraordinary kind. (Those of you with male genitalia have probably crossed your legs already.) Nothing in Harrell's long resume as a petty criminal and drug user suggests he was ever in serious contention for the cast of Puppetry of the Penis. Or, as Harrell himself put it in one of his first interviews with his defense attorney: "I may be big, but I ain't no horse." So far, just a funny story. But it only gets more bizarre on closer examination. The arresting officer, Patrick Manning, claims he saw Harrell drop a crack pipe from his waistband as soon as he became aware of his patrol car. That, at least, was the pretext for the arrest. But Harrell didn't apparently think of dumping the cocaine – assuming he ever had it in the first place. Officer Manning noticed nothing unusual about the way Harrell was walking, and once he had cuffed him and put him in the patrol car he didn't report any wriggling or gasps of pain.

The public defender eventually assigned to Harrell, Eleanor Schneir, had the bright idea of downloading some penis diagrams off the Internet and asked Officer Manning and the two colleagues he took with him into the strip-search room to show the trial jury where exactly the bulge had been. Curiously, each policeman put it in a different place. One said it was at the top, beneath the foreskin proper, while the other two put it further down and to the side. In one diagram the package was almost all the way to the base of the penis – which makes one wonder just how endowed with male genitalia the police officers themselves can have been. Schneir had great fun buying up gourmet gumballs from her local grocery store and waving them at the jury, with a dime taped to the side for size-comparison purposes, just to emphasize the preposterousness of the allegation. She cited no less an authority than Seinfeld to question whether any penis could withstand the cold of the strip-search room without succumbing to the dreaded male problem of shrinkage, which would surely have shaken the incriminating package loose all by itself.

At a certain point, it seemed Harrell was home free, and Schneir was confident enough to berate the prosecution for subjecting him to an embarrassing public spectacle. As she told the jury: "He has to sit here and hear me, his lawyer, his advocate, a woman, argue to a jury of 12 strangers that his penis is too small for this to be possible – what could possibly be more humiliating than that?" Things took an unexpected turn, however, as a batch of photographs of Harrell's genitalia was released to the court and appeared to show that he was circumcised. From Harrell's point of view, this might have looked like a pretty good defense – how, after all, can anyone conceal drugs in their foreskin if they don't have one? In reality, though, the photographs unleashed a furor in the courtroom and changed the terms of the debate entirely. Suddenly, it was not the Inglewood PD whose honesty was under scrutiny but rather Harrell's, as the defendant was accused of yanking his foreskin back for the camera in an attempt to conceal it.

In the single most surreal sequence of the trial, Officer Manning bragged that he knew all about the flexibility of uncircumcised penises because he used to play baseball for the Atlanta Braves (he was a 1999 draft pick later sidelined by a knee injury) and frequently showered with players from Colombia and Central America who not only had foreskins but were frequently "silly" with them. Manning told the prosecutor he saw players pull down their foreskins and dance around for as long as 20 minutes. Schneir wasn't going to let this one go. "I'm a little confused," she said disingenuously. "I was always led to believe that men in showers go to great lengths not to look at each other's penises, and you're telling me you looked for 20 minutes?"

Members of the jury started guffawing. Manning said sheepishly that he hadn't exactly looked for 20 minutes. So Schneir asked him how long he had looked for – 15 minutes, 10 minutes, 5 minutes? Eventually, Manning said he’d looked at one penis for one minute. Schneir deadpanned: "Okay, we're all dying to know: whose penis was it?" For all the courtroom humor, from here on out the trial started slipping out of the grasp of the defense. The deputy district attorney suggested the only way to resolve the circumcision question was to have Harrell re-examined by a medical professional. Harrell told the court he'd had quite enough people looking at his penis and refused. The judge, Deirdre Hill, then instructed the jury that they were free to interpret this refusal as a form of self-incrimination. Schneir tried valiantly to argue that the circumcision question made no difference to the plausibility of the police's story. But the damage was done, and the jury came back with a guilty verdict.

That, of course, is the way so many petty crime cases go. Given the choice between a defendant of dubious character and the testimony of uniformed police officers, juries will almost always side with the police. The Harrell case reflects many of the uglier aspects of law enforcement in Los Angeles: a poor, black, relatively harmless delinquent picked up, handcuffed and stripped by white officers, and lumbered with a serious felony charge for which he has just been sentenced to six years and six months behind bars. Without the allegation of cocaine in his penis, he would have been looking at a misdemeanor and a $100 fine. There is some evidence to suggest that Officer Manning, for one, finds escapades like the apprehension of Stephen Harrell to be a bit of a hoot. Interviewed by a Myrtle Beach, South Carolina newspaper when he first made the leap from baseball to policing, he said patrolling the streets of Inglewood was not entirely unlike competitive sports. "To me, it's almost like a game," he said. "I've had a great time so far."


CAMP LEJEUNE, N.C. (AP) — One of the largest military drug investigations in recent years has led to the conviction of 84 enlisted Marines and sailors at Camp Lejeune. The troops were busted for using and selling Ecstasy, cocaine, LSD and methamphetamine. The Marines and sailors, along with 99 civilians, were arrested in a two-year undercover investigation that also resulted in the seizure of more than $1.4 million worth of drugs. All of the convicted troops received dishonorable discharges and confinement ranging from 3-19 years, said Special Agent Robin Knapp of the Naval Criminal Investigative Service.

The investigation began in February 2000 after Camp Lejeune officials learned that a large number of service members were frequenting clubs where designer drugs were prevalent in Wilmington, about 40 miles south of the base. Arrests were made at the base, in nearby Onslow and New Hanover counties and in Wilmington. Drug charges were filed against 84 active-duty service members, none of them officers. 61 were accused of distributing drugs and 23 were accused of using them. All but two were convicted in military court, Knapp said. Code-named Operation Xterminator, the investigation was conducted by the Naval Criminal Investigative Service office, along with state and local authorities. Knapp called the arrests "significant" but not extraordinary. "This is not unique. This is what we do for a living," Knapp said.

Base spokesman Maj. Steve Cox said the 84 people involved make up a fraction of the 50,000 to 60,000 active-duty personnel at the sprawling coastal base. "That's 0.001% of the forces at Camp Lejeune. It's not an epidemic by any means," he said. "From a Marine Corps perspective, we view drug use as a societal issue. We would be naive to think our Marines are not using drugs." Although narcotics cases in the military are not rare, they usually involve smaller numbers of people. 38 cadets out of 4,300 at the Air Force Academy were implicated in a rash of incidents that began in December 2000 and grew to become the biggest drug scandal in the school's 47-year history. A 1996 case at the U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis, Md., included 5 midshipmen court-martialed and jailed on drug charges and the expulsion of 15 others.

http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/2002/07/03/military-drugs.htm
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: st a s h on September 02, 2008, 03:43:33 PM
in lieu of, your signature appears to be talking about a not-so-studly-horse but you sure know to choose the most fleshy poster to quote! ;)
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: le mains sales on September 05, 2008, 08:56:43 PM


[...] (Karl H. Pribram is an emeritus professor of psychology and psychiatry at Stanford University and Radford University. Board-certified as a neurosurgeon, Pribram did pioneering work on the definition of the limbic system, the relationship of the frontal cortex to the limbic system, the sensory-specific "association" cortex of the parietal and temporal lobes, and the classical motor cortex of the human brain.) Another is how the brain is able to translate the avalanche of frequencies it receives via the senses (light frequencies, sound frequencies, and so on) into the concrete world of our perceptions. Encoding and decoding frequencies is precisely what a hologram does best. Just as a hologram functions as a sort of lens, a translating device able to convert an apparently meaningless blur of frequencies into a coherent image, Pribram believes the brain also comprises a lens and uses holographic principles to mathematically convert the frequencies it receives through the senses into the inner world of our perceptions.

But the most mind-boggling aspect of Pribram’s holographic model of the brain is what happens when it is put together with Bohm’s theory. For if the concreteness of the world is but a secondary reality and what is “there” is actually a holographic blur of frequencies, and if the brain is also a hologram and only selects some of the frequencies out of this blur and mathematically transforms them into sensory perceptions, what becomes of objective reality? Put quite simply, it ceases to exist. As the religions of the East have long upheld, the material world is Maya, an illusion, and although we may think we are physical beings moving through a physical world, this too is an illusion. We are really "receivers" floating through a kaleidoscopic sea of frequency, and what we extract from this sea and transmogrify into physical reality is but one channel from many extracted out of the superhologram.

[...]


[...]

In 1973, what has come to be known as the Pribram-Bohm Holographic Model was non-existent. But the Seattle think tank, Organization for the Advancement of Knowledge (OAK), lead by Richard Alan Miller and Burt Webb were able to synthesize the work of Northrup and Burr on the electromagnetic nature of the human being with Dennis Gabor's work on optical holograms and come up with a new notion – a holographic paradigm. In "Languages of the Brain" (1971), Pribram had postulated that 2-dimensional interference patterns, physical holograms, underlie all thinking. The holographic component, for him, represented the associative mechanisms and contributed to memory retrieval and storage and problem solving.

[...]


That it is feasible to manipulate human behavior with the use of subliminal, either sound or visual, messages is now generally known. This is why in most of the countries the use of such technologies, without consent of the user, is banned. Devices using light for the stimulation of the brain show another way how the light flashing in certain frequencies could be used for the manipulation of human psychic life. As for the sound, a report on the device transmitting a beam of sound waves, which can hear only persons at whom the beam of sound waves is targeted, appeared last year in the world newspapers. The beam is formed by a combination of sound and ultrasound waves which causes that a person targeted by this beam hears the sound inside of his head. Such a perception could easily convince the human being that it is mentally ill. The acts presented in this article suggest that with the development of technology and knowledge of the functioning of human brain new ways of manipulation of human mind keep emerging. One of them seems to be the electromagnetic energy.

In the book "Psychotronic Weapon and the Security of Russia" the authors propose among the basic principles of the Russian concept of the defense against the remote control of human psyche the acknowledgement of its factual existence as well as the acknowledgement of realistic feasibility of informational, psychotronic war (which as a matter of fact is actually taking place without declaration of war)" They quote as well the record from the session of the Russian Federation Federal Council where V. Lopatin stated that psychotronic weapon can "cause the blocking of the freedom of will of a human being on a subliminal level" or "instillation into the consciousness or subconsciousness of a human being of information which will cause faulty perception of the reality." For that matter they propose the preparation of national legislative as well as the norms of international law "aimed at the defense of human psyche against subliminal, destructive, informational effects." As well they propose the declassificcation of all works on this technology and warn that, as a consequence of the classification, the arms race is speeding up making the psychotronic war probable. Among the possible sources of remote influence on human psyche they list the generators of physical fields" of "known as well as unknown nature."

In 1999 the STOA (Scientific and Technological Options Assessment), part of the Directorate General for Research of the European Parliament published the report on Crowd Control Technologies, ordered by them with the OMEGA foundation in British Manchester. One of four major subjects of the study are the 2nd generation" or "non lethal" technologies: "This report evaluates the second generation of 'non-lethal' weapons which are emerging from national military and nuclear weapons laboratories in the United States as part of the Clinton Administration's 'non-lethal' warfare doctrine now adopted in turn by NATO. These devices include weapons using directed energy beam,radiorequency, laser and accoustic mechanisms to incapacitate human targets." The report states that the most controversial non-lethal' crowd control technology proposed by the U.S., are so called Radio Frequency or Directed Energy Weapons that can allegedly manipulate human behavior the greatest concern is with systems which can directly interact with the human nervous system." The report also states that perhaps the most powerful developments remain shrouded in secrecy." The unavailability of offical documents confirming the existence of this technology may be the reason why the OMEGA report is referencing, with respect to mind control technology, the internet publication of the author of this article. In an identical approach the internet publication of the directrice of the American human rights and anti mind control organization (CAHRA), Cheryl Welsh, is referenced by joint initiative of Quaker United Nations Office, United Nations Institute for Disarmament Research, and Programme for Strategic and International Security Studies, with respect to non-lethal weapons.
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: le mains sales on September 05, 2008, 08:59:36 PM
Concrete evidence that electronic mind control was the true object of study at Stanford Research Institute (SRI) was exposed by the Washington Post in 1977. When the Navy awarded a contract to the Institute, "the scientific assistant to the Secretary of the Navy, Dr. Sam Koslov, received a routine briefing on various research projects, including SRI's. As the briefer flashed his chart onto the screen and began to speak, Koslov stormily interrupted, 'What the hell is that about?' Among the glowing words on the projected chart, the section describing SRI's work was labeled

'ELF and Mind Control.'

"'ELF' stands for 'extremely long frequency' electromagnetic waves, from the very slow brain frequencies up to about 100 cycles per second.... But the 'Mind Control' label really upset Koslov. He ordered the SRI investigations for the Navy stopped, and canceled another $35,000 in Navy funds slated for more remote viewing work." Contrary to Koslov's attempt to kill the research, the Navy quietly continued to fork out $100,000 for a two-year project directed by a bionics specialist. The "remote viewing" team at SRI was really engaged in projecting words and images directly to the cranium. It was not a humanitarian pastime: the project was military and test subjects are subjected to a lifetime of EM torture plied with the same thorough disregard for human rights as the radiation tests conducted at the height of the Cold War. To be sure, the treatment subjects have received at the hands of their own government would be considered atrocities if practiced in wartime.

Mind control was also used in domestic covert operations designed to further the CIA's heady ambitions, and during the Vietnam War period SRI was a hive of covert political subterfuge. The Symbionese Liberation Army, like the People's Temple, was a creation of the CIA. The SLA had at its core a clique of black ex-convicts from Vacaville Prison. Donald DeFreeze, otherwise known as "Cinque," led the SLA. He was formerly an informant for the LAPD's Criminal Conspiracy Section and the director of Vacaville's Black Cultural Association (BCA), a covert mind control unit with funding from the CIA channeled through SRI. The Menlo Park behavior modification specialists experimented with psychoactive drugs administered to members of the BCA. Black prisoners were programmed to murder selected black leaders once on the outside. The CIA/SRI zombie killer hit list included Oakland school superintendent Dr. Marcus Foster, and Panthers Huey Newton and Bobby Seale, among others. DeFreeze stated that at Vacaville in 1971-72, he was the subject of a CIA mind control experiment. He described his incarceration on the prison's third floor, where he was corralled by CIA agents who drugged him and said he would become the leader of a radical movement and kidnap a wealthy person. After his escape from Vacaville (an exit door was left unlocked for him), that's exactly what he did.

EM mind control machines were championed at SRI by Dr. Karl Pribram, director of the Neurophychology Research Laboratory: "I certainly could educate a child by putting an electrode in the lateral hypothalmus and then selecting the situations at which I stimulate it. In this was I can grossly change his behavior." Psychology Today touted Pribram as "The Magellan of Brain Science." He obtained his B.S. and M.D. degrees at the University of Chicago, and at SRI studied how the brain processes and stores sensory imagery. He is credited with discovering that mental imaging bears a close resemblance to hologram projection (the basis for transmitting images to the brains of test subjects under the misnomer "remote viewing"?). The SRI/SAIC psi experiments were supervised at Langley by John McMahon, second in command under William Casey, succeeding Bobby Ray Inman, the SAIC director. McMahon has, according to Philip Agee, the CIA whistle-blowing exile, an affinity for "technological exotics for CIA covert actions." He was recruited by the Agency after his graduation from Holy Cross College. He is a former director of the Technical Services Division, deputy director for Operations, and in 1982 McMahon was appointed deputy director of Central Intelligence. He left the Agency six years later to take the position of president of the Lockheed Missiles and Space Systems Group. In 1994 he moved on the Draper Laboratories. He is a director of the Defense Enterprise Fund and an adviser to congressional committees.

Many of the SRI "empaths" were mustered from L. Ron Hubbard's Church of Scientology, Harold Puthoff, the Institute's senior researcher, is a leading Scientologist. Two "remote viewers" from SRI have also held rank in the Church: Ingo Swann, a Class VII Operating Thetan, a founder of the Scientology Center in Los Angeles, and the late Pat Price. Puthoff and Targ's lab assistant was a Scientologist married to a minister of the church. When Swann joined SRI, he stated openly that fourteen "Clears" participated in the experiments, "more than I would suspect." At the time he denied CIA involvement, but now acknowledges, "it was rather common knowledge all along who the sponsor was, although in documents the identity of the Agency was concealed behind the sobriquet of 'an east-coast scientist.' The Agency's interest was quite extensive. A number of agents of the CIA came themselves ultimately to SRI to act as subjects in "remote viewing" experiments, as did some members of Congress."
Title: Mind Control by Alex Constantine
Post by: le mains sales on September 05, 2008, 09:00:36 PM
Concrete evidence that electronic mind control was the true object of study at Stanford Research Institute (SRI) was exposed by the Washington Post in 1977. When the Navy awarded a contract to the Institute, "the scientific assistant to the Secretary of the Navy, Dr. Sam Koslov, received a routine briefing on various research projects, including SRI's. As the briefer flashed his chart onto the screen and began to speak, Koslov stormily interrupted, 'What the hell is that about?' Among the glowing words on the projected chart, the section describing SRI's work was labeled

'ELF and Mind Control.'

"'ELF' stands for 'extremely long frequency' electromagnetic waves, from the very slow brain frequencies up to about 100 cycles per second.... But the 'Mind Control' label really upset Koslov. He ordered the SRI investigations for the Navy stopped, and canceled another $35,000 in Navy funds slated for more remote viewing work." Contrary to Koslov's attempt to kill the research, the Navy quietly continued to fork out $100,000 for a two-year project directed by a bionics specialist. The "remote viewing" team at SRI was really engaged in projecting words and images directly to the cranium. It was not a humanitarian pastime: the project was military and test subjects are subjected to a lifetime of EM torture plied with the same thorough disregard for human rights as the radiation tests conducted at the height of the Cold War. To be sure, the treatment subjects have received at the hands of their own government would be considered atrocities if practiced in wartime.

Mind control was also used in domestic covert operations designed to further the CIA's heady ambitions, and during the Vietnam War period SRI was a hive of covert political subterfuge. The Symbionese Liberation Army, like the People's Temple, was a creation of the CIA. The SLA had at its core a clique of black ex-convicts from Vacaville Prison. Donald DeFreeze, otherwise known as "Cinque," led the SLA. He was formerly an informant for the LAPD's Criminal Conspiracy Section and the director of Vacaville's Black Cultural Association (BCA), a covert mind control unit with funding from the CIA channeled through SRI. The Menlo Park behavior modification specialists experimented with psychoactive drugs administered to members of the BCA. Black prisoners were programmed to murder selected black leaders once on the outside. The CIA/SRI zombie killer hit list included Oakland school superintendent Dr. Marcus Foster, and Panthers Huey Newton and Bobby Seale, among others. DeFreeze stated that at Vacaville in 1971-72, he was the subject of a CIA mind control experiment. He described his incarceration on the prison's third floor, where he was corralled by CIA agents who drugged him and said he would become the leader of a radical movement and kidnap a wealthy person. After his escape from Vacaville (an exit door was left unlocked for him), that's exactly what he did.

EM mind control machines were championed at SRI by Dr. Karl Pribram, director of the Neurophychology Research Laboratory: "I certainly could educate a child by putting an electrode in the lateral hypothalmus and then selecting the situations at which I stimulate it. In this was I can grossly change his behavior." Psychology Today touted Pribram as "The Magellan of Brain Science." He obtained his B.S. and M.D. degrees at the University of Chicago, and at SRI studied how the brain processes and stores sensory imagery. He is credited with discovering that mental imaging bears a close resemblance to hologram projection (the basis for transmitting images to the brains of test subjects under the misnomer "remote viewing"?). The SRI/SAIC psi experiments were supervised at Langley by John McMahon, second in command under William Casey, succeeding Bobby Ray Inman, the SAIC director. McMahon has, according to Philip Agee, the CIA whistle-blowing exile, an affinity for "technological exotics for CIA covert actions." He was recruited by the Agency after his graduation from Holy Cross College. He is a former director of the Technical Services Division, deputy director for Operations, and in 1982 McMahon was appointed deputy director of Central Intelligence. He left the Agency six years later to take the position of president of the Lockheed Missiles and Space Systems Group. In 1994 he moved on the Draper Laboratories. He is a director of the Defense Enterprise Fund and an adviser to congressional committees.

Many of the SRI "empaths" were mustered from L. Ron Hubbard's Church of Scientology, Harold Puthoff, the Institute's senior researcher, is a leading Scientologist. Two "remote viewers" from SRI have also held rank in the Church: Ingo Swann, a Class VII Operating Thetan, a founder of the Scientology Center in Los Angeles, and the late Pat Price. Puthoff and Targ's lab assistant was a Scientologist married to a minister of the church. When Swann joined SRI, he stated openly that fourteen "Clears" participated in the experiments, "more than I would suspect." At the time he denied CIA involvement, but now acknowledges, "it was rather common knowledge all along who the sponsor was, although in documents the identity of the Agency was concealed behind the sobriquet of 'an east-coast scientist.' The Agency's interest was quite extensive. A number of agents of the CIA came themselves ultimately to SRI to act as subjects in "remote viewing" experiments, as did some members of Congress."
Title: Mind Control by Alex Constantine
Post by: le mains sales on September 05, 2008, 09:01:36 PM
Concrete evidence that electronic mind control was the true object of study at Stanford Research Institute (SRI) was exposed by the Washington Post in 1977. When the Navy awarded a contract to the Institute, "the scientific assistant to the Secretary of the Navy, Dr. Sam Koslov, received a routine briefing on various research projects, including SRI's. As the briefer flashed his chart onto the screen and began to speak, Koslov stormily interrupted, 'What the hell is that about?' Among the glowing words on the projected chart, the section describing SRI's work was labeled

'ELF and Mind Control.'

"'ELF' stands for 'extremely long frequency' electromagnetic waves, from the very slow brain frequencies up to about 100 cycles per second.... But the 'Mind Control' label really upset Koslov. He ordered the SRI investigations for the Navy stopped, and canceled another $35,000 in Navy funds slated for more remote viewing work." Contrary to Koslov's attempt to kill the research, the Navy quietly continued to fork out $100,000 for a two-year project directed by a bionics specialist. The "remote viewing" team at SRI was really engaged in projecting words and images directly to the cranium. It was not a humanitarian pastime: the project was military and test subjects are subjected to a lifetime of EM torture plied with the same thorough disregard for human rights as the radiation tests conducted at the height of the Cold War. To be sure, the treatment subjects have received at the hands of their own government would be considered atrocities if practiced in wartime.

Mind control was also used in domestic covert operations designed to further the CIA's heady ambitions, and during the Vietnam War period SRI was a hive of covert political subterfuge. The Symbionese Liberation Army, like the People's Temple, was a creation of the CIA. The SLA had at its core a clique of black ex-convicts from Vacaville Prison. Donald DeFreeze, otherwise known as "Cinque," led the SLA. He was formerly an informant for the LAPD's Criminal Conspiracy Section and the director of Vacaville's Black Cultural Association (BCA), a covert mind control unit with funding from the CIA channeled through SRI. The Menlo Park behavior modification specialists experimented with psychoactive drugs administered to members of the BCA. Black prisoners were programmed to murder selected black leaders once on the outside. The CIA/SRI zombie killer hit list included Oakland school superintendent Dr. Marcus Foster, and Panthers Huey Newton and Bobby Seale, among others. DeFreeze stated that at Vacaville in 1971-72, he was the subject of a CIA mind control experiment. He described his incarceration on the prison's third floor, where he was corralled by CIA agents who drugged him and said he would become the leader of a radical movement and kidnap a wealthy person. After his escape from Vacaville (an exit door was left unlocked for him), that's exactly what he did.

EM mind control machines were championed at SRI by Dr. Karl Pribram, director of the Neurophychology Research Laboratory: "I certainly could educate a child by putting an electrode in the lateral hypothalmus and then selecting the situations at which I stimulate it. In this was I can grossly change his behavior." Psychology Today touted Pribram as "The Magellan of Brain Science." He obtained his B.S. and M.D. degrees at the University of Chicago, and at SRI studied how the brain processes and stores sensory imagery. He is credited with discovering that mental imaging bears a close resemblance to hologram projection (the basis for transmitting images to the brains of test subjects under the misnomer "remote viewing"?). The SRI/SAIC psi experiments were supervised at Langley by John McMahon, second in command under William Casey, succeeding Bobby Ray Inman, the SAIC director. McMahon has, according to Philip Agee, the CIA whistle-blowing exile, an affinity for "technological exotics for CIA covert actions." He was recruited by the Agency after his graduation from Holy Cross College. He is a former director of the Technical Services Division, deputy director for Operations, and in 1982 McMahon was appointed deputy director of Central Intelligence. He left the Agency six years later to take the position of president of the Lockheed Missiles and Space Systems Group. In 1994 he moved on the Draper Laboratories. He is a director of the Defense Enterprise Fund and an adviser to congressional committees.

Many of the SRI "empaths" were mustered from L. Ron Hubbard's Church of Scientology, Harold Puthoff, the Institute's senior researcher, is a leading Scientologist. Two "remote viewers" from SRI have also held rank in the Church: Ingo Swann, a Class VII Operating Thetan, a founder of the Scientology Center in Los Angeles, and the late Pat Price. Puthoff and Targ's lab assistant was a Scientologist married to a minister of the church. When Swann joined SRI, he stated openly that fourteen "Clears" participated in the experiments, "more than I would suspect." At the time he denied CIA involvement, but now acknowledges, "it was rather common knowledge all along who the sponsor was, although in documents the identity of the Agency was concealed behind the sobriquet of 'an east-coast scientist.' The Agency's interest was quite extensive. A number of agents of the CIA came themselves ultimately to SRI to act as subjects in "remote viewing" experiments, as did some members of Congress."
Title: "Mommy And I Are One"
Post by: wheresmyadude on September 06, 2008, 10:53:01 AM


[...] (Karl H. Pribram is an emeritus professor of psychology and psychiatry at Stanford University and Radford University. Board-certified as a neurosurgeon, Pribram did pioneering work on the definition of the limbic system, the relationship of the frontal cortex to the limbic system, the sensory-specific "association" cortex of the parietal and temporal lobes, and the classical motor cortex of the human brain.) Another is how the brain is able to translate the avalanche of frequencies it receives via the senses (light frequencies, sound frequencies, and so on) into the concrete world of our perceptions. Encoding and decoding frequencies is precisely what a hologram does best. Just as a hologram functions as a sort of lens, a translating device able to convert an apparently meaningless blur of frequencies into a coherent image, Pribram believes the brain also comprises a lens and uses holographic principles to mathematically convert the frequencies it receives through the senses into the inner world of our perceptions.

But the most mind-boggling aspect of Pribram’s holographic model of the brain is what happens when it is put together with Bohm’s theory. For if the concreteness of the world is but a secondary reality and what is “there” is actually a holographic blur of frequencies, and if the brain is also a hologram and only selects some of the frequencies out of this blur and mathematically transforms them into sensory perceptions, what becomes of objective reality? Put quite simply, it ceases to exist. As the religions of the East have long upheld, the material world is Maya, an illusion, and although we may think we are physical beings moving through a physical world, this too is an illusion. We are really "receivers" floating through a kaleidoscopic sea of frequency, and what we extract from this sea and transmogrify into physical reality is but one channel from many extracted out of the superhologram.

[...]


[...]

In 1973, what has come to be known as the Pribram-Bohm Holographic Model was non-existent. But the Seattle think tank, Organization for the Advancement of Knowledge (OAK), lead by Richard Alan Miller and Burt Webb were able to synthesize the work of Northrup and Burr on the electromagnetic nature of the human being with Dennis Gabor's work on optical holograms and come up with a new notion – a holographic paradigm. In "Languages of the Brain" (1971), Pribram had postulated that 2-dimensional interference patterns, physical holograms, underlie all thinking. The holographic component, for him, represented the associative mechanisms and contributed to memory retrieval and storage and problem solving.

[...]


That it is feasible to manipulate human behavior with the use of subliminal, either sound or visual, messages is now generally known. This is why in most of the countries the use of such technologies, without consent of the user, is banned. Devices using light for the stimulation of the brain show another way how the light flashing in certain frequencies could be used for the manipulation of human psychic life. As for the sound, a report on the device transmitting a beam of sound waves, which can hear only persons at whom the beam of sound waves is targeted, appeared last year in the world newspapers. The beam is formed by a combination of sound and ultrasound waves which causes that a person targeted by this beam hears the sound inside of his head. Such a perception could easily convince the human being that it is mentally ill. The acts presented in this article suggest that with the development of technology and knowledge of the functioning of human brain new ways of manipulation of human mind keep emerging. One of them seems to be the electromagnetic energy.

[...]


"Mommy and I are one" is a phrase that is claimed to be an effective subliminal message to aid in self motivation. The efficacy of complicated subliminal messages such as this is much disputed, however. The use of this phrase is propounded in a paper by Lloyd Silverman and Joel Weinberger in 1985, entitled "MOMMY AND I ARE ONE: Implications for psychotherapy", published in the American Psychologist. According the Silverman and Weinberger, this phrase works because "there are powerful unconscious wishes for a state of oneness with 'the good mother of early childhood' ... and gratification of these wishes can enhance adaptation." Silverman and Weinberger say that:


Some follow-up work has claimed that in a game of darts, the phrase "It's OK to beat dad" improved scores.

There is strong supportive evidence for the efficacy of the MOMMY AND I ARE ONE message. Two meta-analyses were published in 1990 in major peer reviewed journals (Hardaway in Psychological Bulletin and Weinberger and Hardaway in Clinical Psychology Review). The results of these meta-analyses indicated that the message did yield reliable effects. The meta-analyses on MOMMY AND I ARE ONE indicated that the effects are reliable, of reasonable size, did not depend upon who conducted the study, and were unlikely to be a result of biased reporting of positive results. It appears that something is happening when this message is flashed.

This has been met with considerable skepticism in the scientific community. In general, subliminal messages have not found to have been effective. "Mommy and I are one" is a fairly complicated phrase that seems to require cognition to process, unlike a visceral image of bear or simply the word "enemy." A report from The Scientific Review of Mental Health Practice said:

Quote
Numerous studies had previously demonstrated semantic activation of single words under conditions in which subjects had no phenomenal awareness of the stimulus, as we noted in our reviews. However, no priming study had shown that multiple words, presented subliminally were capable of semantic activation... A recent study by Draine (1997) has cast considerable doubt on the proposition that multiple words presented subliminally can be comprehended. In his work, Draine established that priming effects of word pairs are a function of individual word meanings, rather than their combined meaning. For example, the pair of words "Not Dirty" was perceived to be evaluatively negative. The impact of the prime was uninfluenced by its negation. Draine concluded that two-word grammatical combinations are beyond the analytic powers of unconscious cognition. (see also Greenwald and Liu, 1985).

Additionally, there has not been much success in replicating these results, casting doubt on the validity of the initial studies.
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: BIR on September 06, 2008, 03:42:39 PM

Too many bold posts, I'd say.. Your avatar, schel, illustrates best the concept of "moderation" that some "members" of this board are better off applying...


Funny username, follow me! It brought to my mind an interesting article I read. Here it is:

(http://deepchurch.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2007/09/follow-me-by-firefighter-with-a-camera-on-flickr.jpg)

An oft unexplored miracle in scripture is Jesus' calling of the 12. I'm amazed that the men left all to follow Jesus based on his call: "follow me."

"Follow me" makes sense. But it is what is missing from the call that makes the obedience of the disciples a miracle. Unlike  a secular employer Jesus didn't make any promises. There was no offer of a minimum wage, bonus scheme, annual leave, death in service benefit and so on.  There was just a simple two worded contract of "follow me."

To follow is a walk of faith.

Take Levi (aka. Matthew) for example, he was a tax collector employed by the Roman Governor, his job involved handling what would today be hundreds of thousands of pounds/dollars. Yet, Jesus called him while he was on the job, receiving and watching over tax payments. Jesus expected Levi to leave what he was doing and follow Him, and Levi did exactly that.

Such a walk of faith scares me.

That level of faith scares me. Don't get me wrong, I don't mean I'd never follow Jesus, but it is the kind of call that fills me with heart pounding, nerve racking adrenaline. It is such a BIG challenge. It's a, 'God only you can keep me through this' kind of challenge, totally outside of my Christian comfort zone. I think the scripture that best sums it up is Col. 3:1-2 "If ye then be risen with Christ, seek those things which are above... setting your mind on things on heaven, not on earth" (paraphrased).

True discipleship of Jesus Christ is about being prepared to turn our backs on everything we hold dear in pursuit of His presence. It calls for a total rejection of worldly ambitions, dreams, goals and so on. The 'follow me' of Jesus Christ asks us not just to put Him before our career, He is asking us to walk away from our career to follow Him (if necessary). Christianity is so much more than just church attendance, it is a radical challenge to change the way we live and think. If we are taking our faith seriously we should be a little scared about taking the next step in God, that is good because it means we are moving out of our comfort zones to "follow Him."
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: tght on October 07, 2008, 07:41:30 PM

The Lyrics:

Quote
I am he as you are he as you are me and we are all together.
See how they run like pigs from a gun, see how they fly.
I'm crying.

Now, a lot of songs by The Beatles have these "subliminal" messages. Here it is another weird one from Beatles:

The Beatles', "Revolution 9"

The Lyrics:

Quote
Right! Right!

When you play the track backwards, it sounds like someone screaming, "Get me out! Get me out!"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PG0wksBzKSc


A subliminal message is communicated below the conscious level of perception. By nature, you will not be aware of receiving one. Backmasking, an audio technique in which sounds are recorded backwards onto a track that is meant to be played forwards, produces messages that sound like gibberish to the conscious mind. Gary Greenwald, a fundamentalist Christian preacher, claims that these messages can be heard subliminally, and can induce listeners towards, in the case of rock music, sex and drug use. However, this is not generally accepted as fact.

(http://img147.imageshack.us/img147/6656/soxsatanicsubliminalsrv5.png)
The manual for the popular sound program SoX pokes fun at subliminal messages. The description of the "reverse" option says "Included for finding satanic subliminals."

Following the 1950s subliminal message panic, many businesses have sprung up purporting to offer helpful subliminal audio tapes that supposedly improve the health of the listener. However, there is no evidence for the therapeutic effectiveness of such tapes.

Subliminal messages have also been known to appear in music. In the 1990s, two young men died from self-inflicted gunshots and their families were convinced it was because of a British rock band, Judas Priest. The families claimed subliminal messages told listeners to "do it" in the song "Better by You, Better Than Me". The case was taken to court and the families sought more than US$6 million in damages. The judge, Jerry Carr Whitehead, ruled that the subliminal messages did exist in the song, but stated that the families did not produce any scientific evidence that the song persuaded the young men to kill themselves. In turn, he ruled it probably would not have been perceived without the "power of suggestion" or the young men would not have done it unless they really intended to.

Subliminal messages can affect a human's emotional state and/or behaviors. They are most effective when perceived unconsciously. The most extensive study of therapeutic effects from audiotapes was conducted to see if the self-esteem audiotapes would raise self-esteem. 237 volunteers were provided with tapes of 3 manufacturers and completed post tests after one month of use. The study showed clearly that subliminal audiotapes made to boost self-esteem did not produce effects associated with subliminal content within one month's use. The effectiveness of any subliminal message has been called into question time after time and has led many to one conclusion, namely: that the technique does not work, as Anthony R. Pratkanis, one of the researchers in the field puts it: "It appears that, despite the claims in books and newspapers and on the backs of subliminal self help tapes, subliminal-influence tactics have not been demonstrated to be effective. Of course, as with anything scientific, it may be that someday, somehow, someone will develop a subliminal technique that may work, just as someday a chemist may find a way to transmute lead to gold. I am personally not purchasing lead futures on this hope however."


This appears to be an interesting case :)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FJXFDq7XPOI&feature=related
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: specialization on October 17, 2008, 08:18:51 PM

(http://img522.imageshack.us/img522/79/untitlech7iv8.jpg)


Interesting avatar, oliver! What exactly does it stand for?
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: avalon on November 22, 2008, 02:50:39 PM

[...] however, stimulants (meth, cocaine, etc) are considered to be pro-sex drugs [...]


Amphetamines, including methamphetamine and X (ecstasy), provoke the desire but take away the performance.

Amphetamines can increase one's desire for sex. For men while amphetamines do not make you necessarily  sexually aroused, you start to think about sex and begin to  obsess on it without being able to sleep until you have an orgasm.

But amphetamines often make achieving and maintaining an erection difficult. Conversely, in moderate doses, amphetamines occasionally cause priapism, a painful erection that will not go away on its own. Sometimes because of the erection difficulties and shrinkage amphetamines cause you often find masturbation easier than sex.

Yet, in spite of the erection difficulties amphetamines may cause, you find it possible, although difficult, to achieve orgasm while flaccid. You may never be able to do this, except when on amphetamines.

It may be very difficult to ejaculate while on high doses of amphetamines. Some people see this as an advantage, because it allows men to last longer. However, this side effect can also be very frustrating -- while masturbating on amphetamines it feels like you're gonna cum at any second, but you don't.

The physical sensation of sexual stimulation is better while on amphetamines, but the overall experience may be less enjoyable. After a while, it's like you just want it to be over with.

In very high doses, amphetamines can cause spontaneous orgasm. However, doses this high are extremely dangerous.
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: m e t a n o i a on November 24, 2008, 07:50:25 PM

munee, depends on the kind of drug that person is on. What you're saying is definitely true with opiates (heroin, morphine and the like); however, stimulants (meth, cocaine, etc) are considered to be pro-sex drugs ... 


Amphetamines, including methamphetamine and X (ecstasy), provoke the desire but take away the performance.

Amphetamines can increase one's desire for sex. For men while amphetamines do not make you necessarily  sexually aroused, you start to think about sex and begin to  obsess on it without being able to sleep until you have an orgasm.

But amphetamines often make achieving and maintaining an erection difficult. Conversely, in moderate doses, amphetamines occasionally cause priapism, a painful erection that will not go away on its own. Sometimes because of the erection difficulties and shrinkage amphetamines cause you often find masturbation easier than sex.

Yet, in spite of the erection difficulties amphetamines may cause, you find it possible, although difficult, to achieve orgasm while flaccid. You may never be able to do this, except when on amphetamines.

It may be very difficult to ejaculate while on high doses of amphetamines. Some people see this as an advantage, because it allows men to last longer. However, this side effect can also be very frustrating -- while masturbating on amphetamines it feels like you're gonna cum at any second, but you don't.

The physical sensation of sexual stimulation is better while on amphetamines, but the overall experience may be less enjoyable. After a while, it's like you just want it to be over with.

In very high doses, amphetamines can cause spontaneous orgasm. However, doses this high are extremely dangerous.


Strange, avalon - what we hear is that meth, for instance, greatly increase your sexual appetite and performance. In fact, you are prompted to do the most unbelievable things (sexually speaking) because of being on it. Being high and having sex appear to go hand-in-hand. Uninhibited, disconnected, sometimes violent sex that you obsess about, hunting for orgasms. I have read accounts of people who say they masturbated for 8 (eight) hours straight, with the dildo that got so hot that they had to wear an oven mitt. And unlike cocaine, considered to be the sex drug of the '70s and '80s, crystal meth makes women just as horny as men. Users will say to you that meth becomes sex. It actually stimulates the same part of the brain [the dopamine receptors] that controls sexual arousal. The chemistry of sexual arousal and the chemistry of meth become the same.

Back to the disconnection mentioned above: men especially will tell you that what they remember is that they just needed to @ # ! *, just looking for a receptacle to put their d i c k in. Another user would tell us that he had posted online that the door of the apartment would be left open, anyone could walk in, slam some meth, have sex, and then leave. A young lady who had already had 3 kids taken into foster care went to have an abortion. They put the cervical dilators into her cervix and asked her to come back the next day. She had been smoking all morning when she came back; when the doctor tried to get her undressed, she refused. So they had to convince her that the dilators had to come out.
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: ewige on November 25, 2008, 08:10:09 PM

I definately think LSD is great for introspection. But what if it is an external reality you want to attach yourself to? I tend to believe you'd prefer K-hole levels ketamine in a nice, comfortable, safe environment. Now, I've never had the pleasure of trying mescaline; a friend of mine who's done an extreme dose of Mescaline, several pounds of san pedro, said he spent what felt like a thousand years in another reality. He says mescaline changes you forever, like 2 years after he's still different. He feels as if he has a guardian.


A claim frequently heard about the San Pedro experience is that the user embarks on a flight of a telepathic nature being transported across time and space. A user who embarks on this "astral journey" may perceive events happening in distant parts of the world, or in metaphysical realms. This flight phenomenon, which I have not encountered in my experience with San Pedro, may result from solanaceous plants which are frequently included in the San Pedro brew and contain the Belladonna alkaloids.


Great username, online! Interesting content as well!
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: Master of Ceremonies on December 07, 2008, 04:48:33 PM

It actually stimulates the same part of the brain [the dopamine receptors] that controls sexual arousal.


Here it is how meth and amphetamines work:

http://thebrain.mcgill.ca/flash/i/i_03/i_03_m/i_03_m_par/i_03_m_par_amphetamine.html#drogues
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: j u i l l e t on December 16, 2008, 08:13:05 PM

(http://img264.imageshack.us/img264/5061/69254650499f59c13ayr2mq6.jpg)


Haha - cute!
Title: The Three Metamorphoses of Zarathustra: The Child
Post by: skyy on December 17, 2008, 08:32:09 PM

(http://img264.imageshack.us/img264/5061/69254650499f59c13ayr2mq6.jpg)


Haha - cute!


But tell me, my brothers, what can the child do that the lion cannot? The child is innocence and forgetfulness, a new beginning, a sport, a self-propelling wheel, a first motion, a sacred Yes.

The child possesses unique talents which make it the perfect choice for the third transformation.

The child is innocence. It has no sense of what life was like when the dragon was still alive. There is no guilt because there is no awareness of Thou Shalt. It knows only Becoming -- awaking each day to discover a new idea, a new game to play, a new world to explore.

The child is forgetfulness. It has forgotten the heavy burdens of duty and the longing for freedom. Now, it constantly abides in freedom. It has forgotten the golden scales of the dragon. It has forgotten the ancient ways of the past, the so-called eternal values and standards. It lives only for the moment.

The child is a new beginning. When long-held beliefs have been called into question by the camel, and then destroyed by the lion, one enters a new epoch. After a time, the values one has created for oneself become obsolete. These must not be allowed to become sacred cows, for, eventually, they must be destroyed and replaced by new values. The spirit of the camel will question whether these beliefs are still viable. If not, the spirit of the lion will destroy them. Then comes a new beginning, the spirit of the child, who will bring about the creation of new values. This cyclical process never ends, unless one becomes stagnant, i.e., if one ceases to create by returning to a notion of static Being.

The child is a sport, a game. Children are always inventing new games, along with a set of rules for each. When faced with a problem, even if it is only how to play a silly child's game, the child will create a solution. He will allow spontaneity to flow freely, creating rules that fit the particular situation. The child has no knowledge of anything eternal or transcendent. There is only spontaneity and creative play, that is, until we adults pound our values into their heads. After enculturation is complete, they are fortunate if they ever break free from the Thou Shalts of the herd.

The child is a self-propelling wheel. At this stage of transformation, the child possesses the will to power, or the power to roll its own wheel. Creation is the wheel which is propelled along by the will. As long as it is understood that all is Becoming, the wheel continues to roll along. However, when "wisdom" becomes ensconced in one's thinking, then the wheel comes to a screeching halt.

The child is a first motion. When the great dragon was still alive, no movement existed. There was only static Being; there was no creation. There were only "the values of a thousand years." The camel questioned those values; the lion destroyed them. Now, the child is the first motion, because the child is the creator. Creation is not static, but dynamic. Think of how the earth continually creates and re-creates. Every spring, new life bursts forth from the earth. There is a period of growth, decay, and then death. Creators always pass through such periods of growth, decay, and death. The child represents growth, i.e., the growth of new realities. The camel eventually doubts these realities (decay), and the lion destroys them (death). Then, once more, the child creates new ones, and the process begins all over again.

The child is the sacred Yes. In order for new creation to occur, the spirit of the child must utter a holy Yes to life. Yes, a sacred Yes is needed, my brothers, for the sport of creation: the spirit now wills its own will, the spirit sundered from the world now wins its own spirit.
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: kobacka on January 05, 2009, 11:05:35 AM

The real reason LSD needs to be illegal is not because it makes a tiny percentage of its users crazy, but because of what it does to the vast majority ... LSD does not attract non-conformists so much as it is creates them. One can not, for example, after a serious immersion in LSD, go back to the 9-to-5 world of sales managers and upward mobility. Better to work for yourself, doing something simple and useful, which was why so many hippies became entrepreneurs, farmers, craftspeople. For most, the psychedelic experience dealt a serious blow to their desire for power, and all those buttresses to the power urge that go by the name ambition. The man who comes back through the Door in the Wall will never be the same as the man who went out. He will be wiser but less cocksure, happier but less self satisfied, humbler in acknowledging his ignorance, yet better equipped to understand the relationship of words to things, of systematic reasoning to the unfathomable Mystery which it tries, forever vainly, to comprehend.

"Bad trips" on LSD result from the 11-hour forced introspection that the drug creates. Most cannot stand to look that closely at themselves, certainly not for that long. That's why Leary and company were getting complete cures of psychotics after five or six guided LSD trips, of course, before the government stepped in and outlawed the drug. Well, movie "The Passion of Christ," by Mel Gibson is like being on acid for two straight hours, only the subject isn't yourself, it is Jesus.

Dr. Timothy Leary, interviewed by Playboy, announced that LSD was the most powerful aphrodisiac ever discovered. "Let me put it this way," he said, "compared with sex under LSD, the way you have been making love -- no matter how ecstatic the pleasure you think you get from it – is like making love to a department-store-window dummy. "The three inevitable goals of the LSD session are to discover and make love with God, to discover and make love with yourself, and to discover and make love with a woman."


Strictly speaking, acid is neither a transcendental sacrament, as Leary claimed, nor an anxiety-producing agent, as initially defined by CIA and army scientists. Rather, it is a non-specific amplifier of psychic and social processes. LSD makes you more of what you are. Aldous Huxley concluded that it gives each person what he needs. At the same time acid catalyzes whatever forces are already active in a given social milieu and brings forth those that are latent.

The psychedelic evidence is congruent with the revolutionary implications of relativity theory and quantum mechanics. The belief in scientific objectivity had been shaken in 1927 when Heisenberg enunciated the "uncertainty principle," which held that in subatomic physics the observer inevitably influences the movement of the particles being observed. LSD reseach and many other types of studies suggested that an uncertainty principle of sorts was operative in psychology as well, in that the results were conditioned by the investigator's preconceptions. The "pure" observer is an illusion, and those who thought they could conduct an experiment without "contaminating" the results were deceiving themselves.

Huxley felt that the "scientific" approach was utterly hopeless. "Those idiots want to be Pavlovians" he said, "[but] Pavlov never saw an animal in its natural state, only under duress. The 'scientific' LSD boys do the same with their subjects. No wonder they report psychotics." The practitioners of psychedelic therapy, on the other hand, were cognizant of the complex interaction between set and setting, and they worked to facilitate insight and personal growth. Of course, even the best set and setting could not always guarantee an easy, pleasant, or uncomplicated experience. The goal of a therapeutic session was not to have a "good trip" per se but to work through emotional, creative or intellectual blockages and further the process of self-discovery -- an ordeal that could be very painful at times. Certain schools of psychiatry -- R.D. Laing, for example -- recognized that "freaking out" might actually herald a positive breakthrough to a new level of awareness if properly integrated by the patient. The "perilous passing" through the chaotic realm of the bummer was structured into the drug rituals of primitive societies as part of the sacred "vision-quest." The key figure in the hallucinogenic drama was the shaman, the witch doctor, the medicine man (or woman, as was often the case) who gave song to dreams and provided spiritual access for the entire tribe. A connoisseur of the drug-induced trance state, the shaman derived his or her strength from confronting the terror of ego-death -- the quintessential trial by fire that was seen as a necessary prelude to an ecstatic rebirth, the resurrection of a new personlaity.
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: S i m o n e on January 10, 2009, 11:23:35 AM

Strictly speaking, acid is neither a transcendental sacrament, as Leary claimed, nor an anxiety-producing agent, as initially defined by CIA and army scientists. Rather, it is a non-specific amplifier of psychic and social processes. LSD makes you more of what you are. Aldous Huxley concluded that it gives each person what he needs. At the same time acid catalyzes whatever forces are already active in a given social milieu and brings forth those that are latent.

The psychedelic evidence is congruent with the revolutionary implications of relativity theory and quantum mechanics. The belief in scientific objectivity had been shaken in 1927 when Heisenberg enunciated the "uncertainty principle," which held that in subatomic physics the observer inevitably influences the movement of the particles being observed. LSD reseach and many other types of studies suggested that an uncertainty principle of sorts was operative in psychology as well, in that the results were conditioned by the investigator's preconceptions. The "pure" observer is an illusion, and those who thought they could conduct an experiment without "contaminating" the results were deceiving themselves.

Huxley felt that the "scientific" approach was utterly hopeless. "Those idiots want to be Pavlovians" he said, "[but] Pavlov never saw an animal in its natural state, only under duress. The 'scientific' LSD boys do the same with their subjects. No wonder they report psychotics." The practitioners of psychedelic therapy, on the other hand, were cognizant of the complex interaction between set and setting, and they worked to facilitate insight and personal growth. Of course, even the best set and setting could not always guarantee an easy, pleasant, or uncomplicated experience. The goal of a therapeutic session was not to have a "good trip" per se but to work through emotional, creative or intellectual blockages and further the process of self-discovery -- an ordeal that could be very painful at times. Certain schools of psychiatry -- R.D. Laing, for example -- recognized that "freaking out" might actually herald a positive breakthrough to a new level of awareness if properly integrated by the patient. The "perilous passing" through the chaotic realm of the bummer was structured into the drug rituals of primitive societies as part of the sacred "vision-quest." The key figure in the hallucinogenic drama was the shaman, the witch doctor, the medicine man (or woman, as was often the case) who gave song to dreams and provided spiritual access for the entire tribe. A connoisseur of the drug-induced trance state, the shaman derived his or her strength from confronting the terror of ego-death -- the quintessential trial by fire that was seen as a necessary prelude to an ecstatic rebirth, the resurrection of a new personlaity.


It was Alfred Matthew Hubbard that originally suggested that an LSD-induced mystical experience might harbor unexplored therapeutic potential. He administered large doses of acid to gravely ill alcoholics with the hope that the ensuing experience would lead to a drastic and permanent change in the way they viewed themselves and the world. Once the individual's rigidified notion of himself had been shattered, extensive emotional reeducation was much more likely. By using religious symbols to trigger psychic responses, he attempted to assist the patient in forming a new and healthier frame of reference that would carry over after the drug wore off.

If LSD changed the way sick people looked at the world, would it not have as powerful an effect on others as well? With this in mind Osmond and Hubbard came up with the idea that LSD could be used to transform the belief systems of world leaders and thereby further the cause of world peace. Although few are willing to disclose the details of these sessions, a close associate of Hubbard's insisted that they affected the thinking of the political leadership of North America. Those said to have participated in LSD sessions include a prime minister, assistants to heads of state, UN Representatives, and members of the British parliament. "My job," said Hubbard, "was to sit on the couch next to the psychiatrist and put the people through it, which I did." When certain US medical officials complained that Hubbard was not a licensed physician and therefore should not be permitted to administer drugs, the Captain just laughed and bought a doctor's degree from a diploma mill in Kentucky. "Dr." Hubbard had such remarkable credentials that he received special permission from Rome to administer LSD within the context of the Catholic faith. 

He was, in his own words, a "catalytic agent," who had a "special, chosen role." While this is certainly an accurate appraisal, he was also another kind of agent -- an intelligence agent -- which raises some intriguing questions about what he was really up to. After his legendary exploits with the OSS, the Captain continued to serve as an undercover operative for various agencies within the US government. He had many contacts with the FBI, for example, and he claimed to be a close friend of J. Edgar Hoover's. "That old bugger was tough, really tough," Hubbard said with admiration. But when he tried to turn on the FBI chief, Hoover stubbornly declined. However, the Captain did manage to give the drug to "some top intelligence men in Washington, always with good results." 

During the 1950s Hubbard was asked to join the CIA, but he refused. "They lied so much, cheated so much. I don't like 'em," he snarled. "They're lousy deceivers, sons of the devils themselves." The Captain's beef with the Agency stemmed in part from his unsuccessful attempt to secure back pay owed to him from his OSS days. "They crooked me," he complained bitterly. Hubbard was unkindly disposed toward the CIA for other reasons as well. Most important, he didn't approve of what the Agency was doing with his beloved LSD. "The CIA work stinks," he said, "They were misusing it. I tried to tell them how to use it, but even when they were killing people, you couldn't tell them a goddamned thing." He worked for the Treasury Department as a young man during the Capone days, busting moonshiners and gangsters who were smuggling liquor into the US from Canada. Apparently he was able to ingratiate himself with both sides during Prohibition, as he subsequently became deputy chief of security for the Tropicana Hotel in Las Vegas. "Those Mafia men were always interesting to talk to," Hubbard remarked, "but they never smiled." The Captain also engaged in undercover work for a number of other government agencies, including the Federal Narcotics Bureau and the FDA -- both assisting the CIA's drug testing programs. During the mid-1960s he was employed by Teledyne, a major defense subcontractor, as "director of human factors research." In this capacity Hubbard served as adviser and consultant to a combined navy and NASA project that involved testing the effects of psychochemical agents on a newly designed "helicopter avionics system." Teledyne worked closely with various government organizations, including the CIA, to apply these techniques to additional areas of military interest.
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: that-which-is-not on January 28, 2009, 01:27:34 PM

(http://img380.imageshack.us/img380/4176/33389510qm6.jpg)

droplet of water, not ocean... hmmm... If you cut a hologram in half, each half contains whole views of the entire holographic image. The same is true if you cut out a small piece -­- even a tiny fragment will still contain the whole picture. On top of that, if you make a hologram of a magnifying glass, the holographic version will magnify the other objects in the hologram, just like a real one.

(http://img380.imageshack.us/img380/4416/hologram5ur8.jpg)
The famous hologram "The Kiss" shows a sequence of similar, stationary images. Your eye sees many frames simultaneously, and your brain interprets them as moving images.


Great post schrödinger! Could you expand a little?
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: persirit on February 24, 2009, 12:44:47 PM

(http://img264.imageshack.us/img264/5061/69254650499f59c13ayr2mq6.jpg)


Haha - cute!


But tell me, my brothers, what can the child do that the lion cannot? The child is innocence and forgetfulness, a new beginning, a sport, a self-propelling wheel, a first motion, a sacred Yes.

The child possesses unique talents which make it the perfect choice for the third transformation.

The child is innocence. It has no sense of what life was like when the dragon was still alive. There is no guilt because there is no awareness of Thou Shalt. It knows only Becoming -- awaking each day to discover a new idea, a new game to play, a new world to explore.

The child is forgetfulness. It has forgotten the heavy burdens of duty and the longing for freedom. Now, it constantly abides in freedom. It has forgotten the golden scales of the dragon. It has forgotten the ancient ways of the past, the so-called eternal values and standards. It lives only for the moment.

The child is a new beginning. When long-held beliefs have been called into question by the camel, and then destroyed by the lion, one enters a new epoch. After a time, the values one has created for oneself become obsolete. These must not be allowed to become sacred cows, for, eventually, they must be destroyed and replaced by new values. The spirit of the camel will question whether these beliefs are still viable. If not, the spirit of the lion will destroy them. Then comes a new beginning, the spirit of the child, who will bring about the creation of new values. This cyclical process never ends, unless one becomes stagnant, i.e., if one ceases to create by returning to a notion of static Being.

The child is a sport, a game. Children are always inventing new games, along with a set of rules for each. When faced with a problem, even if it is only how to play a silly child's game, the child will create a solution. He will allow spontaneity to flow freely, creating rules that fit the particular situation. The child has no knowledge of anything eternal or transcendent. There is only spontaneity and creative play, that is, until we adults pound our values into their heads. After enculturation is complete, they are fortunate if they ever break free from the Thou Shalts of the herd.

The child is a self-propelling wheel. At this stage of transformation, the child possesses the will to power, or the power to roll its own wheel. Creation is the wheel which is propelled along by the will. As long as it is understood that all is Becoming, the wheel continues to roll along. However, when "wisdom" becomes ensconced in one's thinking, then the wheel comes to a screeching halt.

The child is a first motion. When the great dragon was still alive, no movement existed. There was only static Being; there was no creation. There were only "the values of a thousand years." The camel questioned those values; the lion destroyed them. Now, the child is the first motion, because the child is the creator. Creation is not static, but dynamic. Think of how the earth continually creates and re-creates. Every spring, new life bursts forth from the earth. There is a period of growth, decay, and then death. Creators always pass through such periods of growth, decay, and death. The child represents growth, i.e., the growth of new realities. The camel eventually doubts these realities (decay), and the lion destroys them (death). Then, once more, the child creates new ones, and the process begins all over again.

The child is the sacred Yes. In order for new creation to occur, the spirit of the child must utter a holy Yes to life. Yes, a sacred Yes is needed, my brothers, for the sport of creation: the spirit now wills its own will, the spirit sundered from the world now wins its own spirit.


Here it is a great song by Mireille Mathieu Vola Vola

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NunMQztlK1o&feature=related
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: Sun M Patinka on February 25, 2009, 03:46:25 PM

(http://img380.imageshack.us/img380/4176/33389510qm6.jpg)

droplet of water, not ocean... hmmm... If you cut a hologram in half, each half contains whole views of the entire holographic image. The same is true if you cut out a small piece -­- even a tiny fragment will still contain the whole picture. On top of that, if you make a hologram of a magnifying glass, the holographic version will magnify the other objects in the hologram, just like a real one.

(http://img380.imageshack.us/img380/4416/hologram5ur8.jpg)
The famous hologram "The Kiss" shows a sequence of similar, stationary images. Your eye sees many frames simultaneously, and your brain interprets them as moving images.


Great post schrödinger! Could you expand a little?


Hahaha - you're so funny, that-which-is-not!

I know what ya mean! ;)
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: AgreeToDisagree on April 12, 2009, 12:08:51 AM
When times get tough (finals nearing, papers due and the like) what do you say/do to keep you going so you don't throw in the towel?


HOP UP OUT THA BEEEEEDDDDD.........
TURN YA SWAGGG ONNNNNNNN....
LOOK IN THE MIRROR, SAY WHAT UP!!!!!!!!!!!

YEEEEAAAAHHHHHH.......IMMA BOUT TA GET MONAYEE...OHHHH


Let this be your mantra everyday and you should be just fine.
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: I Create Therefore I Am on April 15, 2009, 10:05:50 AM

[...] And unlike cocaine, considered to be the sex drug of the '70s and '80s, crystal meth makes women just as horny as men. [...]


And please do mention that, like cocaine, crystal causes horrible bleeding from the nose!
Title: Re: The Three Metamorphoses of Zarathustra: The Child
Post by: part v. whole on April 23, 2009, 09:10:41 AM

Haha - cute!


But tell me, my brothers, what can the child do that the lion cannot? The child is innocence and forgetfulness, a new beginning, a sport, a self-propelling wheel, a first motion, a sacred Yes.

The child possesses unique talents which make it the perfect choice for the third transformation.

The child is innocence. It has no sense of what life was like when the dragon was still alive. There is no guilt because there is no awareness of Thou Shalt. It knows only Becoming -- awaking each day to discover a new idea, a new game to play, a new world to explore.

The child is forgetfulness. It has forgotten the heavy burdens of duty and the longing for freedom. Now, it constantly abides in freedom. It has forgotten the golden scales of the dragon. It has forgotten the ancient ways of the past, the so-called eternal values and standards. It lives only for the moment.

The child is a new beginning. When long-held beliefs have been called into question by the camel, and then destroyed by the lion, one enters a new epoch. After a time, the values one has created for oneself become obsolete. These must not be allowed to become sacred cows, for, eventually, they must be destroyed and replaced by new values. The spirit of the camel will question whether these beliefs are still viable. If not, the spirit of the lion will destroy them. Then comes a new beginning, the spirit of the child, who will bring about the creation of new values. This cyclical process never ends, unless one becomes stagnant, i.e., if one ceases to create by returning to a notion of static Being.

The child is a sport, a game. Children are always inventing new games, along with a set of rules for each. When faced with a problem, even if it is only how to play a silly child's game, the child will create a solution. He will allow spontaneity to flow freely, creating rules that fit the particular situation. The child has no knowledge of anything eternal or transcendent. There is only spontaneity and creative play, that is, until we adults pound our values into their heads. After enculturation is complete, they are fortunate if they ever break free from the Thou Shalts of the herd.

The child is a self-propelling wheel. At this stage of transformation, the child possesses the will to power, or the power to roll its own wheel. Creation is the wheel which is propelled along by the will. As long as it is understood that all is Becoming, the wheel continues to roll along. However, when "wisdom" becomes ensconced in one's thinking, then the wheel comes to a screeching halt.

The child is a first motion. When the great dragon was still alive, no movement existed. There was only static Being; there was no creation. There were only "the values of a thousand years." The camel questioned those values; the lion destroyed them. Now, the child is the first motion, because the child is the creator. Creation is not static, but dynamic. Think of how the earth continually creates and re-creates. Every spring, new life bursts forth from the earth. There is a period of growth, decay, and then death. Creators always pass through such periods of growth, decay, and death. The child represents growth, i.e., the growth of new realities. The camel eventually doubts these realities (decay), and the lion destroys them (death). Then, once more, the child creates new ones, and the process begins all over again.

The child is the sacred Yes. In order for new creation to occur, the spirit of the child must utter a holy Yes to life. Yes, a sacred Yes is needed, my brothers, for the sport of creation: the spirit now wills its own will, the spirit sundered from the world now wins its own spirit.


This entire thing is not actually written by Nietzsche, is it? I mean, it's comment on the third transformation, the child, that Nietzsche talks about..
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: bl825 on April 23, 2009, 09:12:20 AM
What's the deal with this thread and the others like it?  They're incredibly creepy!  :(
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: cconnoll on April 23, 2009, 11:51:30 AM
What's the deal with this thread and the others like it?  They're incredibly creepy!  :(


lol YOU made my day bl825.
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: italics on May 19, 2009, 12:35:55 PM


[...] (Karl H. Pribram is an emeritus professor of psychology and psychiatry at Stanford University and Radford University. Board-certified as a neurosurgeon, Pribram did pioneering work on the definition of the limbic system, the relationship of the frontal cortex to the limbic system, the sensory-specific "association" cortex of the parietal and temporal lobes, and the classical motor cortex of the human brain.) Another is how the brain is able to translate the avalanche of frequencies it receives via the senses (light frequencies, sound frequencies, and so on) into the concrete world of our perceptions. Encoding and decoding frequencies is precisely what a hologram does best. Just as a hologram functions as a sort of lens, a translating device able to convert an apparently meaningless blur of frequencies into a coherent image, Pribram believes the brain also comprises a lens and uses holographic principles to mathematically convert the frequencies it receives through the senses into the inner world of our perceptions.

But the most mind-boggling aspect of Pribram’s holographic model of the brain is what happens when it is put together with Bohm’s theory. For if the concreteness of the world is but a secondary reality and what is “there” is actually a holographic blur of frequencies, and if the brain is also a hologram and only selects some of the frequencies out of this blur and mathematically transforms them into sensory perceptions, what becomes of objective reality? Put quite simply, it ceases to exist. As the religions of the East have long upheld, the material world is Maya, an illusion, and although we may think we are physical beings moving through a physical world, this too is an illusion. We are really "receivers" floating through a kaleidoscopic sea of frequency, and what we extract from this sea and transmogrify into physical reality is but one channel from many extracted out of the superhologram.

[...]


[...]

In 1973, what has come to be known as the Pribram-Bohm Holographic Model was non-existent. But the Seattle think tank, Organization for the Advancement of Knowledge (OAK), lead by Richard Alan Miller and Burt Webb were able to synthesize the work of Northrup and Burr on the electromagnetic nature of the human being with Dennis Gabor's work on optical holograms and come up with a new notion – a holographic paradigm. In "Languages of the Brain" (1971), Pribram had postulated that 2-dimensional interference patterns, physical holograms, underlie all thinking. The holographic component, for him, represented the associative mechanisms and contributed to memory retrieval and storage and problem solving.

[...]


That it is feasible to manipulate human behavior with the use of subliminal, either sound or visual, messages is now generally known. This is why in most of the countries the use of such technologies, without consent of the user, is banned. Devices using light for the stimulation of the brain show another way how the light flashing in certain frequencies could be used for the manipulation of human psychic life. As for the sound, a report on the device transmitting a beam of sound waves, which can hear only persons at whom the beam of sound waves is targeted, appeared last year in the world newspapers. The beam is formed by a combination of sound and ultrasound waves which causes that a person targeted by this beam hears the sound inside of his head. Such a perception could easily convince the human being that it is mentally ill. The acts presented in this article suggest that with the development of technology and knowledge of the functioning of human brain new ways of manipulation of human mind keep emerging. One of them seems to be the electromagnetic energy.

In the book "Psychotronic Weapon and the Security of Russia" the authors propose among the basic principles of the Russian concept of the defense against the remote control of human psyche the acknowledgement of its factual existence as well as the acknowledgement of realistic feasibility of informational, psychotronic war (which as a matter of fact is actually taking place without declaration of war)" They quote as well the record from the session of the Russian Federation Federal Council where V. Lopatin stated that psychotronic weapon can "cause the blocking of the freedom of will of a human being on a subliminal level" or "instillation into the consciousness or subconsciousness of a human being of information which will cause faulty perception of the reality." For that matter they propose the preparation of national legislative as well as the norms of international law "aimed at the defense of human psyche against subliminal, destructive, informational effects." As well they propose the declassificcation of all works on this technology and warn that, as a consequence of the classification, the arms race is speeding up making the psychotronic war probable. Among the possible sources of remote influence on human psyche they list the generators of physical fields" of "known as well as unknown nature."

In 1999 the STOA (Scientific and Technological Options Assessment), part of the Directorate General for Research of the European Parliament published the report on Crowd Control Technologies, ordered by them with the OMEGA foundation in British Manchester. One of four major subjects of the study are the 2nd generation" or "non lethal" technologies: "This report evaluates the second generation of 'non-lethal' weapons which are emerging from national military and nuclear weapons laboratories in the United States as part of the Clinton Administration's 'non-lethal' warfare doctrine now adopted in turn by NATO. These devices include weapons using directed energy beam,radiorequency, laser and accoustic mechanisms to incapacitate human targets." The report states that the most controversial non-lethal' crowd control technology proposed by the U.S., are so called Radio Frequency or Directed Energy Weapons that can allegedly manipulate human behavior the greatest concern is with systems which can directly interact with the human nervous system." The report also states that perhaps the most powerful developments remain shrouded in secrecy." The unavailability of offical documents confirming the existence of this technology may be the reason why the OMEGA report is referencing, with respect to mind control technology, the internet publication of the author of this article. In an identical approach the internet publication of the directrice of the American human rights and anti mind control organization (CAHRA), Cheryl Welsh, is referenced by joint initiative of Quaker United Nations Office, United Nations Institute for Disarmament Research, and Programme for Strategic and International Security Studies, with respect to non-lethal weapons.


Here it is a related article:

www.earthpulse.com/epulseuploads/articles/SynTelepathy.pdf
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: Trivium on May 23, 2009, 08:06:20 AM
In response to the original post, I've motivated myself by creating a far-reaching delusion (that I now firmly believe) that everyone I know hates me, thinks I'm stupid and is positive that I am incapable of achieving at a high level in law school.

But seriously, I just schedule equal parts fun and studying during finals week.
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: Dolce-n-Gabbana on April 21, 2011, 03:49:53 PM

It actually stimulates the same part of the brain [the dopamine receptors] that controls sexual arousal.


Here it is how meth and amphetamines work:

http://thebrain.mcgill.ca/flash/i/i_03/i_03_m/i_03_m_par/i_03_m_par_amphetamine.html#drogues


Ritalin, which is an amphetamine, is rumored to be abused by many law students.
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: shameless on March 27, 2012, 04:18:10 PM
Quote

Quote

[...] Instead of exploiting the slave, the master here tries to take care of the worker so that the worker can continue to work. This allows both master and slave to work for the master's master, work itself. But what is crucial about this is that the "taking care of" here or "feeding" of the slave is only feeding the slave such that the worker's work -- and not the worker himself -- can continue. The emphasis is upon work abstracted from the existence of the slave that provides the work. Thus the slave sinks below the conditions that he would be under if he were wrapped up in the feudal master/slave dialectic, because the master here is not concerned with his existence -- the master is "incompetent to assure the continued existence" of the slave, as Marx puts it. The slave cannot properly be a slave under capitalism. That is, it cannot be assured as to whether he will exist as a slave: his bare existence is threatened in the face of the abstract labor-power he temporarily embodies.

[...] The serf, in the period of serfdom, raised himself to membership in the commune, just as the petty bourgeois, under the yoke of the feudal absolutism, managed to develop into a bourgeois. The modern laborer, on the contrary, instead of rising with the process of industry, sinks deeper and deeper below the conditions of existence of his own class. He becomes a pauper, and pauperism develops more rapidly than population and wealth. And here it becomes evident that the bourgeoisie is unfit any longer to be the ruling class in society, and to impose its conditions of existence upon society as an overriding law. It is unfit to rule because it is incompetent to assure an existence to its slave within his slavery, because it cannot help letting him sink into such a state, that it has to feed him, instead of being fed by him. Society can no longer live under this bourgeoisie, in other words, its existence is no longer compatible with society.


In other words, capitalism contains within itself the seeds of its own destruction. It creates its own grave-diggers by creating a class with interests diametrically opposed to its own, bringing them together and teaching them how to cooperate. The proletariat then comes to realize that it is a class that has nothing to lose, but everything to gain, by revolting against and overthrowing the bourgeoisie.
             
The Marxist meaning based on the mid-19th century Communist Manifesto means that the inability of capitalism to expand without creating, in its wake, periodic and more and more severe economic crises (recessions, depressions, unemployment) will alienate more people. These will not only come from the ranks of the poor laborers (the proletariat) who would be made progressively more miserable under capitalism, but also business failures would lead to portions of the bourgeoisie going over to the side of the allegedly rising class, the proletariat, and this combination would lead to successful revolutionary overthrow of capitalist regimes. This became the bedrock doctrine of Marxism and its 20th century Communist successors.



The question appears to be

With the scarcity nowadays overcome, and the ruling class being able to "enough feeding its slaves," so that the latter will continue to work for him ..

With capitalism having (hopefully) learned from the past (Nazism being the obvious case) that only the most "extreme" and "virulent" elements of their societies can be dealt with harshly/openly enough - with the "careful" and "silent" shunning of the dissident having been raised to   just-about-an-art ..

Would or would you not envisage nowadays some kind of "revolution" as in Marx's days - with millions starving all over the world, because of the politics of the "capitalists" (State's and otherwise)?
Title: Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
Post by: Julie Fern on March 28, 2012, 01:20:16 PM
they paying you people way too much to post.

waaaaaaay too much....