Law School Discussion

Law Students => Transferring => Topic started by: PLSWP on March 15, 2005, 12:39:09 PM

Title: 27% at a 3rd tier
Post by: PLSWP on March 15, 2005, 12:39:09 PM
how far up could someone transfer with a 3.25 in the top 27% from a 3rd teir school?  Is 1st tier possible?
thanks
Title: Re: 27% at a 3rd tier
Post by: theexterminator on April 27, 2005, 07:32:26 PM
First tier probably not ... second tier probably yes
Title: Re: 27% at a 3rd tier
Post by: danlauer on June 03, 2005, 12:59:48 AM
Second tier too would be very difficult
Title: Re: 27% at a 3rd tier
Post by: landauer1 on June 11, 2005, 05:30:37 PM
Loyola Chicago (2d tier) accepts top 25%

http://www.luc.edu/law/admission/transfer1.shtml
Title: Re: 27% at a 3rd tier
Post by: c est ša on June 14, 2005, 03:54:35 AM
25% in a 3d tier is the cut-off for some big law firms to interview you, so you should be okay even if you are not able to transfer to 1st tier
Title: Re: 27% at a 3rd tier
Post by: differencebetween on June 19, 2005, 11:37:22 PM
Loyola Chicago (2d tier) accepts top 25%

http://www.luc.edu/law/admission/transfer1.shtml

;)
Title: Re: 27% at a 3rd tier
Post by: twarga on June 20, 2005, 07:07:27 AM
25% in a 3d tier is the cut-off for some big law firms to interview you, so you should be okay even if you are not able to transfer to 1st tier

Top 27% isn't good enough then.  The OP needs to up his grades to make it into the top 25%.
Title: Re: 27% at a 3rd tier
Post by: maney on June 23, 2005, 05:45:32 PM
25% in a 3d tier is the cut-off for some big law firms to interview you, so you should be okay even if you are not able to transfer to 1st tier

Not really! I'd say the cuttoff for big law firms to interview you is 10%.
Title: Re: 27% at a 3rd tier
Post by: 4L on June 23, 2005, 09:48:56 PM
honestly, if you have the money, try to apply to some first tier law schools but don't be disappointed if you don't get in. Also, hate to make it all strategic, but try to aim for schools that are less known, but still highly ranked. If you have a high LSAT, these schools will try to up their rankings by boosting their LSAT range. Just my two cents. Also, if you know where you want to practice law, a second tier law school in that area will get you the same jobs as a first tier law shcool with no ties to that area. It is my experience that firms are very regional. For example, in the state that I am in, the huge firms will interview at all the local law schools (even though they range from top 20 to third tier). And whatever you do, try to get on law review or stay within the top 20% of your school.
Title: Re: 27% at a 3rd tier
Post by: frame of mind on July 07, 2005, 07:20:16 PM
Even if you don't make it in the top 25% after your first year, you'll probably make it after your second year -- when the top 10-15% of your class will have transferred out your school. You may not be able to transfer out at that point, but you'll probably be ranked better at your school than the transferred out ones will be ranked at the schools they went to ;)
Title: Re: 27% at a 3rd tier
Post by: Noelle on July 13, 2005, 12:46:39 PM
Interesting observations, frame of mind! 
Title: Re: 27% at a 3rd tier
Post by: _/ on August 16, 2005, 04:04:22 AM
I know quite a few people at my school who are not concerned at all about class rank and the like -- they plan to transfer within the tier!
Title: Re: 27% at a 3rd tier
Post by: jjason on August 21, 2005, 03:58:31 PM
I'm sorry - but I disagree with the 4L. First, law schools do not report LSAT for their 2nd year students. What's reported to the ABA (and USNWR) is INCOMING first year LSAT scores. That's the whole appeal to transferring for those who may not have scored well on their LSAT the first time. They excel during their first year, and can transfer to a better school on grades and recommendations. These things have greater weight than LSAT, IF the LSAT is even considered at all by the new law school. Law schools look to transfer students to find qualities desired by the school to fine tune their class. They can accept them without jeopardizing their rankings should the transfer student have a "low" LSAT. Also, transfer students who do really well in their first year have a good chance of passing the bar on the first try, which IS considered in the school's ranking.

I don't understand how the topic shifted to LSAT from the question about transferring from a 3rd tier to a higher ranking school. Do tell me what law school will consider the LSAT score of a transfer applicant over their grades and professor recommendations.  ???
Title: Re: 27% at a 3rd tier
Post by: lipper on August 21, 2005, 05:23:01 PM
lol - i agree. The whole purpose of the LSAT is to measure how well you probably will do first year. why the hell would a school consider an LSAT if they already have that first year performance to judge an applicant?
Title: Re: 27% at a 3rd tier
Post by: jjason on August 22, 2005, 11:11:53 AM
hehe. I'm glad it wasn't just me! I was CONFUSED for a minute there. HA!

Title: Re: 27% at a 3rd tier
Post by: katrina on September 02, 2005, 01:45:41 PM
I know quite a few people at my school who are not concerned at all about class rank and the like -- they plan to transfer within the tier!

LOL I know what you mean! ;)
Title: Re: 27% at a 3rd tier
Post by: istically on September 06, 2005, 03:42:33 PM
Even if you don't make it in the top 25% after your first year, you'll probably make it after your second year -- when the top 10-15% of your class will have transferred out your school. You may not be able to transfer out at that point, but you'll probably be ranked better at your school than the transferred out ones will be ranked at the schools they went to ;)

I guess you have a point here , it just needs to be articulated a little bit better!