Law School Discussion

LSAT Preparation => Studying for the LSAT => Topic started by: myss571 on May 01, 2004, 03:15:54 AM

Title: Weird LSAT Question
Post by: myss571 on May 01, 2004, 03:15:54 AM
Hi, could somebody help me out with this question please? I can't figure out which one is the best answer and the book has used this question as an example in the "Logical Reasoning" Strategies section without actually giving any explanation.

_____________________________ _____________________________ _

Most radicals who argue for violent revolution and complete overthrow of our existing society have no clear idea what will emerge from the destruction. They just assert that things are so bad now that any change would have to be a change for the better. But surely this is mistaken, for things might actually turn out to be worse.

The most effective point that can be raised against this argument is that the author says nothing about,

(A) the manner in which the radicals might foment their revolution.
(B) the specific results of the revolution that would be changes for the worse.
(C) the economic arguments the radicals use to persuade people to join in their cause.
(D) the fact that most people are really satisfied with the present system so that the chance of total revolution is very small.
(E) the loss of life and property that is likely to accompany total destruction of a society.
Title: Re: Weird LSAT Question
Post by: ssasiflow on May 01, 2004, 03:58:41 AM
I think it's D! lol
Title: Re: Weird LSAT Question
Post by: wolfman1977 on May 01, 2004, 04:25:45 AM
I'd say "B".
Title: Re: Weird LSAT Question
Post by: nathanielmark on May 01, 2004, 07:08:21 AM
B is the least worst answer (IMO)
Title: Re: Weird LSAT Question
Post by: grahamers on May 01, 2004, 07:31:12 AM
I guess you didn't like the answers you go on the Princeton Review forum?  Well, for the record, here was what I said there:


It's been a bit since I took the LSAT, but I got a 170, so I'll give it a shot. This does not seem to be a good question example. I don't recall seeing anything this bad on the test. My guess is that NONE of the answers are correct. To break it down:

"Most radicals who argue for violent revolution and complete overthrow of our existing society have no clear idea what will emerge from the destruction. They just assert that things are so bad now that any change would have to be a change for the better. But surely this is mistaken, for things might actually turn out to be worse." Is the statement.

"The most effective point that can be raised against this argument is that the author says nothing about," Is the question you are trying to answer.

That is, what did he leave out that would have made his argument better?

I would choose:

(B) the specific results of the revolution that would be changes for the worse.

It is relevent to his argument of the possibility of things turning worse and if he had included information about this, his argument would have been better. All the other answers would be irrelevent to the arguers argument about things turning worse.

If you get this on the test, skip it. 

PS: I would use only real questions from the LSAT to study, not this one.

Title: Re: Weird LSAT Question
Post by: kinkyone on May 28, 2004, 05:59:00 PM
Ginatio, why don't ya better go and @#!* a cucumber???
Title: Re: Weird LSAT Question
Post by: Skittles on May 31, 2004, 08:38:10 PM
I'm going to say 'A' or 'B'... both are equally least wrong.  But it is a BAD question. I hate to say it, but it looks like a Kaplan question.
Title: Re: Weird LSAT Question
Post by: dex on June 05, 2004, 11:56:24 PM
The question comes from ARCO's TestMasters book -- I run into it yesterday when fishing through the shelves of my local BN
Title: Re: Weird LSAT Question
Post by: superiorlobe on June 14, 2004, 06:32:23 PM
I have an ARCO Logic Workbook, which has got to be one of the worst LSAT books I ever bought.  There are a couple game examples in which the choices contain two right answers.  In the explanation section they go through all the choices and don't even seem to notice the fact that they explain that both answers are correct.  I just couldn't believe it.  I stared at that stupid example for a very long time, unable to comprehend a mistake so blatant.  Also, even when they don't make clear mistakes, the games are nothing at all like real LSAT games.  So I don't recommend buying ARCO books unless they have really incredibly dramatically improved since the 2000 edition, which is the one I have.

All that being said, the "best" answer (in my humple opinion) to the question above is B.
Title: Re: Weird LSAT Question
Post by: coeruleus on October 29, 2004, 08:02:45 AM
The question comes from ARCO's TestMasters book --

I was thinking TestMasters uses *real*, licensed LSAT questions ... it looks like it is not so
Title: Re: Weird LSAT Question
Post by: smart on October 29, 2004, 11:13:31 AM
Hi, could somebody help me out with this question please? I can't figure out which one is the best answer and the book has used this question as an example in the "Logical Reasoning" Strategies section without actually giving any explanation.

_____________________________ _____________________________ _

Most radicals who argue for violent revolution and complete overthrow of our existing society have no clear idea what will emerge from the destruction. They just assert that things are so bad now that any change would have to be a change for the better. But surely this is mistaken, for things might actually turn out to be worse.

The most effective point that can be raised against this argument is that the author says nothing about,

(A) the manner in which the radicals might foment their revolution.
(B) the specific results of the revolution that would be changes for the worse.
(C) the economic arguments the radicals use to persuade people to join in their cause.
(D) the fact that most people are really satisfied with the present system so that the chance of total revolution is very small.
(E) the loss of life and property that is likely to accompany total destruction of a society.
Here is my thought: first the question (from where?) is not even close to real LSAT type question.  Second, the argument presented in the stimulus is extremely weak and simple.
Third, I beleive you must change the text as soon as possible, and use the actual real LSAT.
Finally, I beleive the answer is B.   What kind of question is this in terms of type?  Assumption or inference?  None of them. This is totally outside of the LSAT question type.   
Title: Re: Weird LSAT Question
Post by: Hocine on October 29, 2004, 01:18:07 PM
Okay, I'm replying without reading the other replies, so I apologize if this is redundant...

My answer choice is B, scroll down for why.


Most radicals who argue for violent revolution and complete overthrow of our existing society have no clear idea what will emerge from the destruction. They just assert that things are so bad now that any change would have to be a change for the better. But surely this is mistaken, for things might actually turn out to be worse.

...what's wrong with this argument? ... it provides no support for the conclusion... so look for an answer choice that says "hey you didn't give even one premise that supports your conclusion that 'things might turn out to be worse'"

The most effective point that can be raised against this argument is that the author says nothing about,

(B) the specific results of the revolution that would be changes for the worse.
"Really, they might turn out to be worse?  How?  Give me a specific result of the revolution that would be a change for the worse"


Actually this one was pretty easy, because once you've identified the conclusion, it's pretty easy to eliminate all the other answer choices..
Title: Re: Weird LSAT Question
Post by: legallyliz on October 29, 2004, 03:56:41 PM
The question comes from ARCO's TestMasters book --

I was thinking TestMasters uses *real*, licensed LSAT questions ... it looks like it is not so

TestMasters (the prep course, www.testmasters180.com, DOES use real, previously administered LSAT questions.  ARCO is a completely different story (even if they do call their "TestMasters").
Title: Re: Weird LSAT Question
Post by: indeed on October 30, 2004, 07:44:46 AM

TestMasters (the prep course, www.testmasters180.com, DOES use real, previously administered LSAT questions. ARCO is a completely different story (even if they do call their "TestMasters").

Some companies avoid the cost of licensing real LSAT questions altogether by using simulated LSAT questions in their courses. Whereas real LSAT questions are created by a carefully selected group of experienced psychometricians, simulated LSAT questions can be written by just about anybody. In addition, real LSAT questions, unlike simulated LSAT questions, are pretested on thousands of test takers in experimental sections in order to weed out questions that may be flawed or biased in some respect. As a result of these differences, simulated questions tend to be poor approximations of genuine ones. They contain language and exhibit syntax that the real test writers would never use, and the subject matter of these questions often deviates substantially from what appears on the real exam. Incredibly, many of the answer choices that are labeled correct on simulated questions would constitute incorrect answer choices on the real LSAT. Students who work with simulated questions confuse what is not the LSAT with what really is the LSAT and may end up lowering their scores as a result. Consequently, students should avoid LSAT preparation courses that make use of simulated questions. In addition, consumers should be aware of the fact that simulated questions are especially prevalent in many LSAT preparation books that are currently on the market. Publishers such as Barron's, Cliffs, Peterson's, and Arco sell inexpensive study guides that contain only simulated questions. These publishers collectively define the low end of the LSAT preparation industry.

http://www.testmasters180.com/lsat/whyWeAreTheBest/LSATquestions.aspx
Title: Re: Weird LSAT Question
Post by: WitterUin4 on October 31, 2004, 03:10:10 PM
B.
Title: Re: Weird LSAT Question
Post by: St. Shaun on November 25, 2004, 07:09:32 AM
Man, this makes me want to study for the LSAT again. [meant to be read as] I'm sure glad I don't have to study for the freaking LSAT anymore.
Title: Re: Weird LSAT Question
Post by: menses1 on March 13, 2005, 08:22:20 PM
Hahaha! This is a pretty funny question stem!
Title: Re: Weird LSAT Question
Post by: underwhelm on March 13, 2005, 08:25:35 PM
I agree B and I agree that it's not a real question.
Title: Re: Weird LSAT Question
Post by: emmanuelle on March 30, 2005, 06:27:39 PM
the specific results of the revolution that would be changes for the worse. It is framed as if the radical revoultion is bad
Title: Re: Weird LSAT Question
Post by: bogyaa on April 07, 2005, 09:11:02 AM
The answer is B because the argument in the stem states that those who argue for anarchy give no ways in which the anarchy mentioned could provide for better society, but the stem gives no ways in which the anarchy mentioned could provide for a worse society.  Hence, B, which states that the stem author gives no examples of ways in which the anarchy could produce bad results, must be correct.
Title: Re: Weird LSAT Question
Post by: Silvermtn on April 29, 2005, 10:21:38 PM
I would say 'B' but this dosen't seem like a question from an actual LSAT practice test and I would not take any practice test that is not an official prep test from law services.
Title: Re: Weird LSAT Question
Post by: desacration on May 25, 2005, 08:20:03 PM
the specific results of the revolution that would be changes for the worse. It is framed as if the radical revoultion is bad

;)
Title: Re: Weird LSAT Question
Post by: breckenridge on June 20, 2005, 03:48:42 AM
the specific results of the revolution that would be changes for the worse.

I just do not get how things could get worse ... worse than they already are???
Title: Re: Weird LSAT Question
Post by: LSATguy on June 21, 2005, 02:38:12 PM
B

Dude stop creating useless threads like these. If you are really interested in preparing for LSAT kick this book out of your house RIGHT NOW.
Title: Re: Weird LSAT Question
Post by: Geddon187 on June 22, 2005, 10:51:14 AM
B

Dude stop creating useless threads like these. If you are really interested in preparing for LSAT kick this book out of your house RIGHT NOW.

The original post on this thread is over a year old. I think this guy probably already took the LSAT, so I wouldn't worry about it.
Title: Re: Weird LSAT Question
Post by: LSATguy on June 22, 2005, 11:28:33 AM
B

Dude stop creating useless threads like these. If you are really interested in preparing for LSAT kick this book out of your house RIGHT NOW.

The original post on this thread is over a year old. I think this guy probably already took the LSAT, so I wouldn't worry about it.

Oh  ;D
Title: Re: Weird LSAT Question
Post by: truthexperiments on October 10, 2005, 12:03:00 PM
I think it's D! lol

;)
Title: Re: Weird LSAT Question
Post by: mikefear on October 23, 2005, 11:49:32 PM
A, C and E are clearly wrong..

D doesn't make much sense.

I'd go with B.
Title: Re: Weird LSAT Question
Post by: caffedelmar on October 25, 2005, 03:39:40 PM
A, C and E are clearly wrong..

D doesn't make much sense.

I'd go with B.

Actually I'd say D is the one they put it there to "make sense" ... ;)
Title: Re: Weird LSAT Question
Post by: mikefear on October 25, 2005, 08:22:19 PM
A, C and E are clearly wrong..

D doesn't make much sense.

I'd go with B.

Actually I'd say D is the one they put it there to "make sense" ... ;)
While I agree, B doesnt even make sense.. so the "attractive" option, D, is even less sensical :o
Title: Re: Weird LSAT Question
Post by: revelareveritas on November 09, 2005, 12:03:40 PM
My guess is "B", but don't listen to me, I got a 149... Did I mention I kicked a$$ on the GRE though?

- J
Title: Re: Weird LSAT Question
Post by: 12 on March 04, 2006, 05:02:43 PM
It is really a weird quest.
Title: Re: Weird LSAT Question
Post by: pouge007 on April 03, 2006, 12:42:25 PM
Id say its clearly B
Title: Re: Weird LSAT Question
Post by: la bouche on April 12, 2006, 03:20:58 PM
Hi, could somebody help me out with this question please? I can't figure out which one is the best answer and the book has used this question as an example in the "Logical Reasoning" Strategies section without actually giving any explanation.

_____________________________ _____________________________ _

Most radicals who argue for violent revolution and complete overthrow of our existing society have no clear idea what will emerge from the destruction. They just assert that things are so bad now that any change would have to be a change for the better. But surely this is mistaken, for things might actually turn out to be worse.

The most effective point that can be raised against this argument is that the author says nothing about,

(A) the manner in which the radicals might foment their revolution.
(B) the specific results of the revolution that would be changes for the worse.
(C) the economic arguments the radicals use to persuade people to join in their cause.
(D) the fact that most people are really satisfied with the present system so that the chance of total revolution is very small.
(E) the loss of life and property that is likely to accompany total destruction of a society.

This is not a real question. It's a simulated question.
Title: Re: Weird LSAT Question
Post by: Ron Shivenstein on April 18, 2006, 06:49:17 PM
My guess is "B", but don't listen to me, I got a 149... Did I mention I kicked a$$ on the GRE though?

- J

A 149 is really low. PM me for any advice.

-Shivenstein
Title: Re: Weird LSAT Question irr
Post by: syracuse1L on July 27, 2006, 02:15:05 PM
B - has to be the answer

A - this is avoiding the question, which is asking about ENDS, not MEANS
C - irrelevent information
D - besides the point of the argument
E - too much of a logical stretch to include this in a reasonable counter argument