Law School Discussion

50% off tution for Hosftra and New York Law School vs: nothing from St. John's

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Guys, ideally I would love to stay in Cali and attend a school such Pepperdine ( in contrast to the other schools I got accepted to in Cali). But, I can't. I need to be in NY. I just wish someone can just be up front with me and look at the NY schools with a "non-corporate" perspective. I have absolutely no interest in practicing corporate law- or else I would retake and apply to a top tier schools.
Right now, my concern is to pick the best of the worst schools in NY.

I do appreciate all the responses thus far and would happy to hear more from you.

The truth.

You will have trouble finding gainful employment after law school given your situation.  If I was you, I would not go to law school.  Move to NYC for whatever reason you have and get a job.  Work for three years, get some experience, AND THEN when you can move back to California - go to law school.

Going to a POS law school in NYC and then moving to a super-competitive legal market will leave you poor and miserable.

thanks for agreeing with me, nischay. OP, have you decided to take the majority's advice? we think you shouldn't go to another country or state for law school when your intentions ultimately lie in practicing in a very specific geographic area- the fact that you know where you want to practice (something about 67% of law school aspirants don't) is something to value. and you should make the most of it by networking and making potential connections to use later on as favors down the road.

OlderandWiser

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Guys, ideally I would love to stay in Cali and attend a school such Pepperdine ( in contrast to the other schools I got accepted to in Cali). But, I can't. I need to be in NY. I just wish someone can just be up front with me and look at the NY schools with a "non-corporate" perspective. I have absolutely no interest in practicing corporate law- or else I would retake and apply to a top tier schools.
Right now, my concern is to pick the best of the worst schools in NY.

I do appreciate all the responses thus far and would happy to hear more from you.

OP, I work in the legal system in NYC and here is what I can tell you from a purely anecdotal standpoint about these schools.  St.Johns tends to have students who are much more theoretical or research focused.  I have often heard complaints that in general St. Johns students do not graduate with the practical skills that you might get other places. Not a bad thing, it just depends on what you want to do.  If you get into Fordham or Cardozo, definitely go.  Not only in terms of prestige, but they seem to produce many fine attorneys who are very good at what they do.  Pace also seems to produce attorneys that know their stuff and are prepared to practice law when they graduate, though not as many as Fordham/Cardozo.  NYLS seems hit or miss.  I know a couple of graduates and some current students.  They all give very lukewarm reviews. CUNY is great if you are into public interest and very cheap.  However, I would say they graduate a fair number of, to use a technical term, wack-a-doos. So while you may be an excellent student there, your classmates might not be.  Hofstra I have little to no experience with, there is only one woman I know who graduated from there. HTH.  I can't really speak about the mobility of the degrees from any these schools, though I suspect Fordham is the best.  It sounds like you are set on NYC so this advice is based on that assumption. And remember, I am only looking at this from a criminal/civil/housing/family, law perspective (cuz that's what I do).  some of these schools may perform much better depending on what you want to study and what kind of job you hope to have.  good luck with your decision!   

lol at all the posts telling you to go to a cali school, despite you repeatedly saying this is not an option. i was wondering though, why no mention of brooklyn law school? this usually gets paired with cardozo and seems to be a step above st.johns, et. al. any reason why youre not considering it?

^ the OP has already answered that question, crisp. twice, in fact. read the entire thread before you begin insulting those of us who recommended the OP stay in cali for school.

i am not joking when i say this... a "good job" out of hofstra or NYLS is document review at a big law firm. no matter where you went to law school, if you are a lawyer in NYC, you make sport out of mocking the resumes of applicants from Hofstra or NYLS, because no matter how bad your alma mater is, these two are worse.

st. john's is not Harvard or even Fordham, but it has a network of lawyers who practice law (as opposed to review documents) throughout the city. if its between these 3, go to st johns. the white shoe firms generally take 1-4 people from St Johns as well. for proof, go look at Simpson Thatcher's website.

or, better yet, as somebody said earlier, retake and go to fordham or go to Fordham PT and then transfer after your first year.

^ the OP has already answered that question, crisp. twice, in fact. read the entire thread before you begin insulting those of us who recommended the OP stay in cali for school.

If you could quote these for me i'd appreciate it. I don't see my question being addressed anywhere.

Waiting for Those Letters

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Finding a small firm job in Cali after graduating from any of the lower NY schools is just begging for problems. Unless you have family ties who can get you your first job in Cali. Otherwise, best case scenario, you struggle to find a job in NY, work there for 1 or 2 years, and THEN you'll have a more realistic chance of achieving that goal.

I actually do have some connections in southern Cal. But of course, as you said, the worse scenerio of staying in NY is not that bad.

Waiting for Those Letters

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thanks for agreeing with me, nischay. OP, have you decided to take the majority's advice? we think you shouldn't go to another country or state for law school when your intentions ultimately lie in practicing in a very specific geographic area- the fact that you know where you want to practice (something about 67% of law school aspirants don't) is something to value. and you should make the most of it by networking and making potential connections to use later on as favors down the road.


I understand what you are saying, and you are right. However ,like I have mentioned for personal reasons I need to be in NY. So, I need to choose between schools over there.

Waiting for Those Letters

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Wow! Thank you so much for such a thorough response.
Yes, if I can get it to Fordham, Cardozo or Brooklyn, I would go in a heartbeat!!!! But, I highly doubt I will get in based on my numbers. There are tons of people our there who have my GPA. But, there are tons of people out there who have that AND a higher LSAT score than I do.

So, perhaps I should have mentioned this before, but I plan to go into teaching afterwards- specifically teaching paralegal or introductory law classes at a local community college or a state univeristy ( NOT PLANNING ON TEACHING AT A LAW SCHOOL).

Guys, ideally I would love to stay in Cali and attend a school such Pepperdine ( in contrast to the other schools I got accepted to in Cali). But, I can't. I need to be in NY. I just wish someone can just be up front with me and look at the NY schools with a "non-corporate" perspective. I have absolutely no interest in practicing corporate law- or else I would retake and apply to a top tier schools.
Right now, my concern is to pick the best of the worst schools in NY.

I do appreciate all the responses thus far and would happy to hear more from you.

OP, I work in the legal system in NYC and here is what I can tell you from a purely anecdotal standpoint about these schools.  St.Johns tends to have students who are much more theoretical or research focused.  I have often heard complaints that in general St. Johns students do not graduate with the practical skills that you might get other places. Not a bad thing, it just depends on what you want to do.  If you get into Fordham or Cardozo, definitely go.  Not only in terms of prestige, but they seem to produce many fine attorneys who are very good at what they do.  Pace also seems to produce attorneys that know their stuff and are prepared to practice law when they graduate, though not as many as Fordham/Cardozo.  NYLS seems hit or miss.  I know a couple of graduates and some current students.  They all give very lukewarm reviews. CUNY is great if you are into public interest and very cheap.  However, I would say they graduate a fair number of, to use a technical term, wack-a-doos. So while you may be an excellent student there, your classmates might not be.  Hofstra I have little to no experience with, there is only one woman I know who graduated from there. HTH.  I can't really speak about the mobility of the degrees from any these schools, though I suspect Fordham is the best.  It sounds like you are set on NYC so this advice is based on that assumption. And remember, I am only looking at this from a criminal/civil/housing/family, law perspective (cuz that's what I do).  some of these schools may perform much better depending on what you want to study and what kind of job you hope to have.  good luck with your decision!