Law School Discussion

EAST OR WEST, HOME IS BEST?

MY

EAST OR WEST, HOME IS BEST?
« on: April 06, 2006, 04:38:40 AM »
Undecided OL here .. accepted by UCLA and George Washington .. I know, I know, one is better than the other .. the thing is that I wanna stay home .. I'm a down-to-earth Midwestern boy ..

Re: EAST OR WEST, HOME IS BEST?
« Reply #1 on: April 06, 2006, 04:04:45 PM »
then DEFINITELY go West to UCLA.. :P

Seriously, a little change in culture would do you good. You could probably EASILY transfer back home if you wanted. Congrats. Good luck!

Re: EAST OR WEST, HOME IS BEST?
« Reply #2 on: April 06, 2006, 09:28:52 PM »
Actually you should think about it very hard and visit both places. I'm from NYC and i'm stuck in CA right now. I hate CA and I wish I had stayed home. Ther's nothing I could do about it now, for various reasons. So make sure you know what you're getting yourself into. If you know that the LA environment is gonna be rough on you, it could affect how well you do in LS. I mean, the fact that I don't like it here won't make me get Cs or anything, but it does affect you. But you're from the Midwest and neithe school you mentioned is close to home for you, so i guess you'll have to see which one is least un-homelike. good luck in your decision.

Re: EAST OR WEST, HOME IS BEST?
« Reply #3 on: April 07, 2006, 01:19:28 AM »
How easy is it to transfer. If your in a T25-50 to a T2 do you need to be top 15?

Re: EAST OR WEST, HOME IS BEST?
« Reply #4 on: April 07, 2006, 04:06:24 AM »
Quote
EAST OR WEST, HOME IS BEST?

No doubt that that's the case, but in yours I don't think it holds true, so why are you asking?!

Re: EAST OR WEST, HOME IS BEST?
« Reply #5 on: April 09, 2006, 05:19:19 AM »
The George Washington University Law School, commonly referred to as GW Law, founded in 1825, is the oldest law school in the District of Columbia. The law school enrolled its first class in 1865. Until the 1980s, it was known as "The National Law Center at The George Washington University."

The school is accredited by the ABA and is a charter member of the AALS. The school currently has about 1,860 degree candidates: 1,260 full-time, 290 part-time, and over 300 post-J.D. candidates.

In 2000, the law school began a major building and renovation scheme to create an integrated, modern learning facility. The school continues to expand into attached buildings along perimeters of the University Yard.

GW Law is currently ranked 19th on the U.S. News & World Report list of "Top 100 Law Schools." In its specialties categories, U.S. News ranks GW Law 3rd in intellectual property law, 6th in international law, 12th in environmental law, and 15th in clinical training. The law school is the highest-ranked graduate program of its parent institution, The George Washington University.

In 2005, the GW Law Student Bar Association was named 1 the Student Bar Association of the Year by the American Bar Association. GW Law's student-run newspaper, the Nota Bene, won the 2005 ABA award for Editorial of the Year and SBA President Eric Koester was a finalist for 2005 SBA President of the Year.

Also in 2005, a team from GW Law won the world championship in the Manfred Lachs Space Law Moot Court Competition in Fukuoka, Japan.

Notable alumni of The George Washington University Law School include:

Earl E. Anderson, Ret. General United States Marine Corp
Rocky Anderson, current mayor of Salt Lake City
William Barr (1977), former United States Attorney General
A. Bruce Bielaski, second director of the Bureau of Investigation
Mona Charen, political analyst and best-selling author
Bennett Champ Clark, former United States Senator
Floyd I. Clarke, former director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation
George B. Cortelyou, cabinet member in the Theodore Roosevelt administration
Warren Brown (1998), founder and owner of Cake Love, and host of "Sugar Rush" on the Food Network
John Foster Dulles, Secretary of State in the Dwight D. Eisenhower administration
W. Mark Felt (1940), former associate director of the FBI and Watergate scandal informant also known as "Deep Throat"
Stanley Finch (1908), first director of the Bureau of Investigation
J. William Fulbright (1934), former United States Senator, creator of the Fulbright Fellowships
Dan Glickman (1969), current president of the Motion Picture Association of America
L. Patrick Gray, former acting director of the FBI during the Watergate scandal
Patricia Roberts Harris (1960), cabinet member in the Jimmy Carter administration
J. Edgar Hoover (1917), founder and longtime director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation
Harry R. Hughes (1952), former governor of the state of Maryland
Daniel Inouye (1953), United States Senator, (D-HI)
Leon Jaworski (1925), special prosecutor during the Watergate scandal
David M. Kennedy, former United States Secretary of the Treasury
Michael Kinsley, political commentator and journalist, former co-host of CNN's Crossfire
Belva Ann Lockwood (1872), first woman to argue before the United States Supreme Court
Frank Moss (1937), former United States Senator, (D-UT)
Francis G. Newlands (1869), congressman and drafter of the Newlands Resolution to annex the Republic of Hawai'i
Barbara Pariente (1973), current Chief Justice of the Florida Supreme Court
Harry Reid (1964), United States Senator, Current Senate Minority Leader, (D-NV)
Mikhail Saakashvili (1996), President of Georgia
John W. Snow (1967), current United States Secretary of the Treasury
James E. Webb (1936), second administrator of NASA