Law School Discussion

Nine Years of Discussion
;

Author Topic: How to predict a full tuition scholarship  (Read 9394 times)

vap

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 1310
  • Attorney
    • View Profile
How to predict a full tuition scholarship
« on: April 04, 2007, 01:06:56 PM »
This is the methodology I used when I was applying, and it worked for me.  I am curious if any of you would like to follow this method and post your results. 

I used the the ABA/LSAC data to see 1) the # of students receiving full tuition or more scholarship and 2) the applicant profile of each school.  I took the total # of students receiving full tuition or more scholarships, divided by 3, and looked at the applicant profile to see if my scores placed me among the top students (who are the most likely to receive scholarships).

If you look at the applicant profile in a sweeping fashion (upper left box, then the box to the right of it and the box below it, then boxes to the right and bottom of those starting in the highest LSAT range, etc.) you could probably get a good indication of what your scores need to be in order to receive a full ride.  This favors the LSAT score slightly because you always look for the LSAT score first.

To obtain the ABA/LSAC data for your school, go here and click on the link to a school and then open the PDF files:
http://officialguide.lsac.org/SearchResults/ShowAllSchools.aspx

As an example, you would look at the boxes in the applicant profile in this order for most schools (though some schools have different brackets):
1) LSAT 175-180 GPA 3.75+
2) LSAT 175-180 GPA 3.50-3.74
3) LSAT 170-174 GPA 3.75+
4) LSAT 175-180 GPA 3.25-3.49
5) LSAT 170-174 GPA 3.50-3.74
6) LSAT 165-169 GPA 3.75+
7) LSAT 175-180 GPA 3.00-3.24
8. LSAT 170-174 GPA 3.25-3.49
9) LSAT 165-169 GPA 3.50-3.74
10) LSAT 160-164 GPA 3.75+
11) LSAT 175-180 GPA 2.75-2.99
12) LSAT 170-175 GPA 3.00-3.24
13) LSAT 165-169 GPA 3.25-3.49
14) LSAT 160-164 GPA 3.50-3.75
15) LSAT 155-159 GPA 3.75+
And so on...

Whatever bracket you reach following the sweeping methodology I described above, your scores should be at that or higher on your numbered list.  Sometimes, however, there are outlier LSAT scores.  Someone with a 177 LSAT and 3.10 GPA comes to mind, which could get a full ride over someone with a 165 LSAT and 3.75 GPA (even though the list above says they shouldn't). You could include those if you want.

The amounts will vary greatly depending on the school.  For example, look at two similarly-ranked schools, Arizona and American (please note that the rank used is from the 2007 USNWR and the LSAT/GPA 75% are from ABA/LSAC):
 
Arizona: (Rank #43, LSAT 75% 164, GPA 75% 3.78)
# of students receiving full tuition or more scholarships / 3 = 21
Top 21 applicants' scores = LSAT 165-169 GPA 3.75+

So, from the list above, your expectation to receive a full tuition scholarship should be extremeley high if your scores are:
1) LSAT 175-180 GPA 3.75+
2) LSAT 175-180 GPA 3.50-3.74
3) LSAT 170-174 GPA 3.75+
4) LSAT 175-180 GPA 3.25-3.49
5) LSAT 170-174 GPA 3.50-3.74
You have a good chance at a full scholarship if your scores are:
6) LSAT 165-169 GPA 3.75+
And you probably have somewhat of a chance at a full scholarship if your scores are:
7) LSAT 175-180 GPA 3.00-3.24
8. LSAT 170-174 GPA 3.25-3.49

American: (Rank #43, LSAT 75% 163, GPA 75% 3.63 ... includes both full and part time)
# of students receiving full tuition or more scholarships / 3 = 11
Top 11 applicants' scores = LSAT 170-174 GPA 3.75+

So, from the list above, your expectation to receive a full tuition scholarship should be extremeley high if your scores are:
1) LSAT 175-180 GPA 3.75+
2) LSAT 175-180 GPA 3.50-3.74
You have a good chance at a full scholarship if your scores are:
3) LSAT 170-174 GPA 3.75+


Here's a comparison of what happend with some of my lower-ranked schools (scores 160/4.0).

McGeorge:
(Rank #97, LSAT 75% 159, GPA 75% 3.48 ... includes both full and part time)
# of students receiving full tuition or more scholarships / 3 = 6
Top 6 applicants' scores = LSAT 165-180 GPA 3.75+
Predicted Result = no full scholarship with my scores
Actual Result = no full scholarship

Houston: (Rank #70, LSAT 75% 162, GPA 75% 3.72)
# of students receiving full tuition or more scholarships / 3 = 3
Top 3 applicants' scores = LSAT 170-180 GPA 3.75+
Predicted Result = no full scholarship with my scores
Actual Result = no full scholarship

Texas Tech: (Rank 3rd Tier, LSAT 75% 158, GPA 3.75)
# of students receiving full tuition or more scholarships / 3 = 31
Top 31 applicants' scores = LSAT 165-169 GPA 3.25-3.49
Predicted Result = excellent chance of full scholarship
Actual Result = full scholarship

Mercer: (Rank #87, LSAT 75% 158, GPA 75% 3.67)
# of students receiving full tuition or more scholarships / 3 = 20
Top 20 applicants' scores = LSAT 160-164 GPA 3.75+
Predicted Result = good chance of full scholarship
Actual Result = full scholarship


This method is not perfect because it assumes that everyone offered the full tuition scholarships will accept.  The # of scholarships data is based on those who actually attend the school and have scholarships while the applicant profile data is based on only those who are admitted (but do not necessarily attend).  So, this methodology produces a conservative estimate.  Also, it does not account for special scholarships such as diversity of public interest full tuition scholarships, or the self-selection involved with scholarships that require special applications.  For example, American offers 10 public interest/service full tuition scholarships a year, so when you look at the data above, you see it's very unlikely that you will receive a full scholarship from American based solely on LSAT and GPA.

For anyone this application cycle that did not receive a full tuition scholarship but was realistically hoping for it from a particular school, I encourage you to follow the methodology above and post your results.  Similarly, if you do receive a full scholarship from a school, I also encourage you to post your results.  I would really be interested to see if this process works for other people as it has worked for me.

Gopherit

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 441
    • View Profile
Re: How to predict a full tuition scholarship
« Reply #1 on: April 04, 2007, 01:16:58 PM »
.
UMN '10

vap

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 1310
  • Attorney
    • View Profile
Re: How to predict a full tuition scholarship
« Reply #2 on: April 04, 2007, 04:07:20 PM »
I started a thread seeking input from LSDers on how to predict whether or not you will receive a full tuition scholarship.   Care to help and see if it accurately predicted your results?

http://www.lawschooldiscussion.org/prelaw/index.php/topic,85956.0.html

I would love to help, but to be frank- I don't get your system!! :)

I was afraid of that! Ha. I don't think I explained it very well.

Here is an example, looking at the University of Arizona data.
http://officialguide.lsac.org/OFFGUIDE/CGI-BIN/OFFGUIDE.ASP?sid=006&item=main

1) View the "Law School Data" PDF.
2) On page 2, there is a "grants and scholarships" header.
3) Add the # of students receving full tuition and more than full tuition together. For Arizona, it's 63.
4) Since 63 is the # of current students receiving full rides, divide by 3 to determine the average # per class, 21.
5) Close the "Law School Data" PDF.
6) View the "Law School Description" PDF.
7) On page 2, there is an "applicant profile."
8. Starting with the 175-180/3.75+ box, add the number of students admitted, then continue adding to the 175-180/3.50-3.74 box, then the 170-174/3.75+ box, then the 175-180/3.25-3.49 box, then the 170-174/3.50-3.74 box, then the 165-169/3.75+ box.  Continue adding, following the order of the numbered list in the original post.  Stop when you have reached or exceeded the average # of students with scholarships in a class, which might mean you won't add all the boxes I listed in the previous sentence.  Whatever box you end on, you should be fairly confident that you will receive a full ride if you have scores in that range or in a range listed higher in the numbered list from the original post.

El_Che

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 601
    • View Profile
    • 0L Musings
Re: How to predict a full tuition scholarship
« Reply #3 on: November 29, 2007, 12:07:13 AM »
It seems like a valid method, although I a.) don't like math and b.) am not good at math, so I can neither confirm nor deny the method. However, it looks good :) and maybe it'll give me some hope at some schools!