Law School Discussion

Nine Years of Discussion
;

Author Topic: My experience: Yonsei Testing Center in Seoul, Korea  (Read 3426 times)

sheltron5000

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 1416
  • All weather operation. Batteries not included.
    • View Profile
My experience: Yonsei Testing Center in Seoul, Korea
« on: September 30, 2008, 12:05:49 PM »
OK. I've gotten a few people asking for more information about my experience at the Seoul LSAT.

Just FYI, I took the 2008 June LSAT. When I took it there was a good deal of confusion about the testing center, LSAC gave the test takers the wrong center, and changed the location, but not the test center number.

NOTE: This was an aberration and a mistake on LSAC's part not on the Korean procter's.

I took a taxi the morning of--just tell the taxi driver "Yonsei DaeHakYo." I looked at the big map at the entrance to find the building and walked there. It was pretty easy to find. Unfortunately, by 8:30 nothing was happening and all the 200 or so people there were milling around confused. Eventually someone from the test administrators--who had called LSAC to find out why they didn't have anyone there--came and told us there had been a mistake. They told us where the real testing center would be and delayed the test by two hours so we could get there with plenty of time. They announced this in English and Korean. I took a bus with a bunch of other people, someone who knew where the other university was and got there in plenty of time.

NOTE: This was an aberration and a mistake on LSAC's part not on the Korean procter's.

For the test itself. All the signs were in English, though the test takers seemed to be more than 2/3 korean--but  I know from talking to some of the korean test takers that many of them were American or Canadian, so whatever. People were assigned to rooms by last names. When it was time for the test, we had to leave our backpacks downstairs, then go upstairs to the testing rooms. Your stuff is pretty safe in Korea so that wasn't really a big deal. Then we lined up to go into our respective rooms.

We had to sign and show an ID, just like at the LSAT in the US. The proctors were all, or almost all, older women (ajuma, if you know korean), so there wasn't much communication necessary there. Plus, the koreans there to take the test were happy to translate for us foreigners. Each room had two proctors, and at least one of them spoke reasonably good English. In my room it was a younger guy, he looked like he was maybe a freshman in college. They gave directions in both Korean and English, although the directions in Korean seemed more complex. The instructions in English were adequate. One note, if your proctor says something about "sharp pencils" they mean mechanical pencils which are no longer allowed on the LSAT, bring your own + sharpener. When it came to the actual test though, the English speaking proctor just read the instructions from the book.

As for the testing Environment, there was nothing wrong with it. It was mid-june in Seoul, so it was hot, but the room had AC. There was a bit of a tug of war over the AC, a lot of the Koreans complained about the noise so they turned it off, then everyone was too hot, so they turned it back on during the break. The building was well shaded though, so it never got REALLY hot... The lighting was a little dim, as I've found is typical of Korean classrooms. The desks were the standard tabletop-attached-to-chair kind of deal, but there was an empty desk between all the testers so there was plenty of space. On a seating note, I and the other foreigners noticed that we were all seated in one column, and the Koreans had the rest of the space, which was a little odd.

The proctors were reasonable, I think they were actually intimidated by all the foreigners. But they were strict about some of the rules, such as no mechanical pencils. I think if you insisted loudly enough on anything that was reasonable they would cave eventually. As I said, one proctor spoke English the other did not, but nothing came up to test the communication issues so... *shrug* Timing wise, things seemed fairly normal. The proctors had their own timer, then wrote time left on the board. I used my watch to time myself, and although their time was fine, it did seem a little looser than I had expected, maybe 1 minute off or so, and the warnings could be a little odd--four minute warning instead of five, etc.

NOTE: The LSATs administered outside of North America, and I think the Caribbean, are not disclosed, and they use a different test from the disclosed ones as well. So if you see questions discussed that you don't remember (from my test I remember people talking about the cupcake game that I never saw), that's why. That means they use a different score band, which is not disclosed either, I think. Also, the times can be very different, so be sure to check your ticket for the time and date, it may not be the same as the test administered in North America.

I think that's all I can remember, if anyone has anything else to add, or any questions I'll try to reply to them pretty soon.

Good luck everyone!

-sheltron5000

EDIT: I forgot something really important! The proctors were ALL very nice and neutral, nothing to send you into spiraling fits of nervousness. Calm atmosphere on their side, the most nervous were all the test takers.
LSN

I'd love to join this LGBT club.  It's the Legos, Gobots, Barbies, and other Toys group, right?  I'll show up with an armful of toys.

elsathermit

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 30
    • View Profile
    • The El Sat Hermit
Re: My experience: Yonsei Testing Center in Seoul, Korea
« Reply #1 on: September 30, 2008, 07:07:33 PM »
awesome. if i fail this october, i'll be retaking in korea so i appreciate this.  :)
(Oct 08: 172) (June 09: 177)

rush the rushdie

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 150
    • View Profile
Re: My experience: Yonsei Testing Center in Seoul, Korea
« Reply #2 on: September 30, 2008, 11:31:13 PM »
dude, i can't believe foreign students (whose second language is English) are going up against some of those brutal RC and LR questions.  seriously, props.  i could never do that. 

sheltron5000

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 1416
  • All weather operation. Batteries not included.
    • View Profile
Re: My experience: Yonsei Testing Center in Seoul, Korea
« Reply #3 on: October 01, 2008, 12:37:32 AM »
dude, i can't believe foreign students (whose second language is English) are going up against some of those brutal RC and LR questions.  seriously, props.  i could never do that. 

agreed. im constantly amazed by what some people will do to go to school in the us.
LSN

I'd love to join this LGBT club.  It's the Legos, Gobots, Barbies, and other Toys group, right?  I'll show up with an armful of toys.

kor591

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 110
    • View Profile
Re: My experience: Yonsei Testing Center in Seoul, Korea
« Reply #4 on: October 01, 2008, 11:25:23 AM »
hi sheltron5000 ,
Your post was definitely helpful, thanks a lot.

I will be taking the lsat on sunday and was wondering whether you took urs in chonghapkwan in june.
My lsat admission ticket says chonghapkwan, yonsei univ on it.

Also, once you receive ur score, did you get the details for how many questions u missed on each section and etc??
Or is it just like the Feb Lsat where u only get the percentile and the score?

Thanks!

sheltron5000

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 1416
  • All weather operation. Batteries not included.
    • View Profile
Re: My experience: Yonsei Testing Center in Seoul, Korea
« Reply #5 on: October 04, 2008, 02:08:46 AM »
I honestly can't remember the name of the university we ACTUALLY ended up at--too much stress--and the building at yonsei we ended up not using, so I don't remember the name of that one either. It wasn't too hard to find the buildings at yonsei though, they have big map on the right after the main gate.

As for the score, I didn't get any details other than the scaled score (120-180) and the percentile. Again none of the tests outside the US, Canada, and the Carribean are disclosed, probably because I took mine a full day or two before everyone else.

Yes, the score report I got is--I think--just like the score report from a February test.
LSN

I'd love to join this LGBT club.  It's the Legos, Gobots, Barbies, and other Toys group, right?  I'll show up with an armful of toys.