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Author Topic: The underrated writing sample for LSAT  (Read 2498 times)

Dante Hicks

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The underrated writing sample for LSAT
« on: June 06, 2004, 10:32:01 AM »
Anyone have any good advice for the writing sample portion.  It seems to be overlooked yet we still have to do it in the alotted time.

Is the quick n' dirty view of it to just pick any side of the scenario and just argue it based on the given materials?

They say they don't look at these but for anyone who's noticed, LSAC has recently been looking for people ($50 pay) to try out an idea to do writing samples that CAN BE SCORED.
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Silversoma

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Re: The underrated writing sample for LSAT
« Reply #1 on: June 06, 2004, 12:03:19 PM »
I've started to practice the writing sample on some of my exams, and the advice that I have read states that one should attempt to completely fill the page- which isn't hard to do, considering it's only 27 lines long.  The first time I wrote it, I was finished in 13 min, so I have changed my strategy to make myself spend at least 10 minutes just planning the essay.  Since it is so short, I think that the writing sample is all about "how" you write, as well as "what" you write about.

That's my advice- slow down, and spend 10+ minutes just planning.
Practice LSATs so far: 156 155 157 155 157 161 162 161 155 155 160 164 166 161 170 166 168 160 163 162 172

LSAT's finished... I don't have to think about law school for a year now.
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Silversoma

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Re: The underrated writing sample for LSAT
« Reply #2 on: June 06, 2004, 12:04:51 PM »
Oh, and BTW, I wish that there was a scored writing sample, though obviously there will not be one on the June 14th exam...  :P
Practice LSATs so far: 156 155 157 155 157 161 162 161 155 155 160 164 166 161 170 166 168 160 163 162 172

LSAT's finished... I don't have to think about law school for a year now.
********* GO Team Canada GO!!!!! ***********

nathanielmark

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Re: The underrated writing sample for LSAT
« Reply #3 on: June 06, 2004, 12:07:14 PM »
i follow a template for this.  first paragraph restating the basic problem with the two choices and stated criteria used to make decision.  second paragraph i discuss choice i am not taking, acknowledging strengths but then pointing out weaknesses. third paragraph i talk about choice i am taking, minimizing weaknesses and highlighting strengths.  last paragraph i summarize my recomendation, offering a summarized comparison on how my choice is superior.

Skittles

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Re: The underrated writing sample for LSAT
« Reply #4 on: June 06, 2004, 12:18:59 PM »
We had to do two of these for the MCAT, it's easier than you think.  Just make an outline first and make sure you're keeping good time. 

I'm just worried about my spelling.  I really can't spell at all.  I still don't know if arguement is spelled "arguement" or "argument." IT's really pathetic.  And I've tried to learn how to spell but for some reason I just never get the hang of it.  So when I write spontaneously I have to try to use only words I know how to spell... which limits my vocabulary to like the fifth grade level.

Skittles

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Re: The underrated writing sample for LSAT
« Reply #5 on: June 06, 2004, 12:24:27 PM »
Oh, and BTW, I wish that there was a scored writing sample, though obviously there will not be one on the June 14th exam...  :P

They score the writing sample of the MCAT and it's still considered a joke.  I think all writing samples are a joke.  When in your life (no matter what field you go into) will you ever need to write spontaneously without references or even a dictionary?  To me, being good at writing samples is a parlor trick.

Silversoma

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Re: The underrated writing sample for LSAT
« Reply #6 on: June 06, 2004, 12:45:12 PM »

When in your life (no matter what field you go into) will you ever need to write spontaneously without references or even a dictionary?  To me, being good at writing samples is a parlor trick.

Well Skittles, I guess that's true about writing samples... but wouldn't you say that any type of testing material, due to its highly artificial nature, is really just a 'parlour trick'?  I mean, when in the real world will you ever have to answer questions by bubbling in  A, B, C, D, or E on your answer sheet?

And I can definitely sympathize with your spelling problem... if you can't spell, it doesn't mean that you suck at writing ;)
Practice LSATs so far: 156 155 157 155 157 161 162 161 155 155 160 164 166 161 170 166 168 160 163 162 172

LSAT's finished... I don't have to think about law school for a year now.
********* GO Team Canada GO!!!!! ***********

Dante Hicks

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Re: The underrated writing sample for LSAT
« Reply #7 on: June 06, 2004, 01:29:07 PM »
Thanks all.  Some good approaches (like Greeny's template).

I'm screwing up bad on the Logic Games section all of a sudden on my prep tests.  Not sure what's up with that. I have been taking breaks from prepping, albeit breaks that are used to do homework for school.

I am almost wondering if I should postpone until Oct. I would feel like a wimp if I did that but that doesn't matter when you want a good score.  I know, I know...it is unlikely to raise my socre significantly by a few more months but I bet I could.  It would be better than taking the LSAT twice and getting the scores averaged or whatever.

I might just say @#!* it and still take it.  I wish all of you bastards were feeling this way too..it would ease my mind a bit.
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M2

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Re: The underrated writing sample for LSAT
« Reply #8 on: June 06, 2004, 01:30:54 PM »
Thanks all.  Some good approaches (like Greeny's template).

I'm screwing up bad on the Logic Games section all of a sudden on my prep tests.  Not sure what's up with that. I have been taking breaks from prepping, albeit breaks that are used to do homework for school.

I am almost wondering if I should postpone until Oct. I would feel like a wimp if I did that but that doesn't matter when you want a good score.  I know, I know...it is unlikely to raise my socre significantly by a few more months but I bet I could.  It would be better than taking the LSAT twice and getting the scores averaged or whatever.

I might just say @#!* it and still take it.  I wish all of you bastards were feeling this way too..it would ease my mind a bit.


I say take it and get it over with. You can always cancel you score if you think you did badly.
Even if you have to cancel and then take in October, at least you will be somewhat familiar with taking the test in a real setting.

Skittles

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Re: The underrated writing sample for LSAT
« Reply #9 on: June 06, 2004, 01:57:32 PM »

When in your life (no matter what field you go into) will you ever need to write spontaneously without references or even a dictionary?  To me, being good at writing samples is a parlor trick.

Well Skittles, I guess that's true about writing samples... but wouldn't you say that any type of testing material, due to its highly artificial nature, is really just a 'parlour trick'?  I mean, when in the real world will you ever have to answer questions by bubbling in  A, B, C, D, or E on your answer sheet?


Oh I don't think so.  Reading comprehension is an essential skill no matter what profession you go intro.  We all need to be able to read relatively quickly and truely understand what we've read.  I mean, that IS law school.  And with games I think they're just testing some reasoning skill they think is important. But I don't think they even read the writing samples.