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Author Topic: Multiple LSAT Score Policies for Top 100 Schools  (Read 14713 times)

midjeep

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Multiple LSAT Score Policies for Top 100 Schools
« on: November 26, 2004, 10:33:31 PM »
I know how frustrating it is for people who have multiple LSAT scores so I have published this listing. Since the majority of the people who use this site focus on tier 1 and tier 2 schools, I have only listed those schools and its USNEWS ranking. Most of the info is from BGOM who compiled the majority of the list a month or so ago. There are a few schools I couldn't find info on from these main pages. If someone is familar with its LSAT policies please post it here or PM and I will edit this list (please cite the source too, I won't post your name online if you seek anonymity). Also, if you have conflicting info, please send that, when you got the info, and the source. If you want the MS Word version emailed to you, give me your email address and Ill email it to you when I get a chance. I also added some info on some of the schools I have been looking at regarding its in-state residency policies. If you know a policy (regarding residency) for a school listed here, please send me that info too.  

-If it ends with (EMAIL) that means I emailed the school directly and that is its official response.

-All the schools without sources came from LSD user BGOM. I am assuming that person either received an email or found the info on the schools website/brochure.

-All listings I found info from are listed on the bottom of this list
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midjeep

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Re: Multiple LSAT Score Policies for Top 100 Schools
« Reply #1 on: November 26, 2004, 10:34:58 PM »
TIER 1:

1. Yale University (169-175): Not Sure.

2. Harvard (169-174): If you take the test more than once, all scores and their average will be reported and considered. Otherwise it is a case-by-case basis.

3. Stanford (166-171): If the test is taken more than once, the scores will be averaged to account for the normal increase expected when an applicant repeats such a standard examination.

4. Columbia (167-173): If improvement by 8 or more points, committee may give more weight to the higher score.

5. NYU (168-173): We see the higher score but evaluate based on the average score in most cases. The Committee may take special circumstances into account. If a candidate can point out specific reasons why the Committee should consider an LSAT score aberrant, they should detail those reasons in an addendum to the personal statement.

6. Chicago (167-171): The Committee will average LSAT scores and percentiles in the case of multiple scores unless you present extraordinary circumstances that would discount the reliability of the lower score.

7. Michigan (164-169): Consideration is given to each score, as well as to the average score. If there is a significant disparity between the two scores -- six or more points -- you should consider addressing the difference in performance in an optional essay.

7. UPenn (164-170): If there are circumstances that you believe affected your performance on a prior test, we encourage you to provide an additional statement with your application explaining those circumstances. The Admissions Committee will consider such information and may, at its discretion, evaluate your application based on the higher or highest LSAT score.

9. Virginia (165-170):  You should notify law schools of any facts relevant to the interpretation of your test results, such as illness or extenuating circumstances. If there is no reason to believe that one score represents a truer estimate of an applicant's ability, law schools are advised that the average score is probably the best estimate of ability—especially if the tests were taken over a short period of time. The Admissions Committee makes a case-by-case determination whether to rely on the average, highest, or most recent LSAT score. The greater the disparity between the scores, the more likely we are to conclude that the average is not the best predictor.

10. Duke (162-169): Multiple LSAT scores are averaged, however, we do note the higher score. We would encourage you to include an additional statement to explain any significant difference in your scores.

10. Northwestern (166-170): The highest score earned on the LSAT

12. Cornell (165-168): We consider the highest score but all scores are reviewed. We invite explanations from applicants regarding why we should place more weight on the highest score.

13. Cal-Berkeley (160-168): If applicants have taken the LSAT more than once, Boalt Hall’s general policy is to use their average score. Therefore, applicants should retake the test only if they are confident that their first score was atypical and they can improve their score sufficiently to make a net gain.

14. Georgetown (167-170): Georgetown usually takes the highest LSAT score if you have taken the LSAT twice. Please address any mitigating circumstances you feel the committee should consider.

15. Texas (160-166): Candidates with multiple LSAT scores are evaluated using the average of all LSAT scores as figured by Law Services.

16. UCLA (162-168): We ordinarily average LSAT scores; we may overlook the first one if there is a good reason.

17. Vanderbilt (162-166): Deloggio says average.

18. USC (164-167): Not Sure.

19. Minnesota (160-165): The Admissions Committee policy is to consider the average score, of multiple LSAT scores, when evaluating an application for admission. However, if the applicant takes the LSAT a second or third time, and increases the LSAT score by four points, or more, then the Admissions Committee will consider the higher score.

20. George Washington (162-167): Most applicants submitting multiple LSAT scores are only a couple points apart. In those cases, we take the average of the scores. In cases where scores are 10-15 points apart, I look at the rest of the record to decide which one to accept. Taking the LSAT a third time would help. If you have 2 strong scores and a weak one, this would establish the strong scores as the relevant ones.

20. Notre Dame (161-166): it is the policy of the Law School to average LSAT scores when an applicant has taken the LSAT more than once within a five-year period.

20. Washington University (STL) (161-166): If you take the test more than once, all of your scores are considered, with the multiple scores averaged.

23. Boston University (163-166): If an applicant has taken the test more than once, the average score will be considered in the admission review unless the applicant provides extenuating circumstances serious enough to justify the consideration of a single score.

23. Emory (160-165): If there is more than one score on the LSDAS report, the average of those scores will be used.

23. Iowa (157-164): Generally the Admissions Committee uses the average of the scores. If there is a significant improvement the Committee may use the higher score.

23. Washington and Lee (163-167): We look at each LSAT score when there are multiples.  We don't calculate a numerical average, but we do note improvement and take it into consideration when reviewing a file. (EMAIL)

27. Illinois (159-164): We average multiple LSAT scores for purpose of reporting to the ABA but consider the highest score in the admission process.  You may include an addendum with an explanation, if you wish, it is your option.  We do not give preference to residency. (EMAIL)

27. UNC (157-164): If the LSAT is taken more than once, the highest of the scores earned may be used.

29. Boston College (161-165) 29: If you are taking more than one LSAT test, we average the scores. The LSDAS report does show all scores so if you do significantly better on one, the committee will see that. You are welcome to write an addendum and attach it to your application explaining the reasons why you chose to take multiple tests.

29. William and Mary (161-165) 29: Scores for multiple test takers are averaged for statistical purposes. However, the individual scores are considered in the review process.

31. Georgia (158-164): When multiple LSAT scores are involved, we average the scores.

31. Wisconsin (158-164): If you have multiple LSAT scores, we will take the average. However, we see all of your scores, so we will take into account any improvements you've made. If you feel that an explanation of your scores is required you can certainly add an addendum to your application. As for preference to state residents, we don't give residents any special consideration, but 55-60% of our students are from Wisconsin and the number of in-state applicants is lower than out of state students. (EMAIL)

33. UC Davis (158-163): Multiple scores are averaged. The Admissions Committee has access to all scores submitted and, therefore, is aware of any 'significant' increase or decrease. A change of five points or more is considered significant. You should provide an explanation of any significant change in your LSAT score.

34. BYU (161-166): 4lawschool.com says average.

34. Fordham (163-167): We will average the scores.

34. Washington (159-166): We average multiple LSAT scores.

34. Wake Forest (160-163): We encourage you to prepare carefully for the LSAT. If you take the LSAT more than once, we'll consider the average of your scores.

38. George Mason (159-165): We will receive each LSAT score from Law Services and, therefore, will see if there has been significant improvement. However, for statistical purposes, we will consider the average of any LSAT scores that you earned in the past 5 years.

38. UC- Hastings (160-165): Although multiple LSAT scores are averaged by Law Services, with a 10+ point differential in scores, the committee may review both scores separately.

40. Indiana University- Bloomington (159-164):  If there is a substantial increase in the score, we would be inclined to look at the higher score.

40. Alabama (159-163): We look at both scores individually. I am not sure how the committee weights the different scores, but they are looked at separately.

42. Ohio State- Moritz (155-162): There is no special preference given to in-state residents, we have applicants from all over applying.  It is our policy to average multiple LSAT scores, however, we do recommend that you attach an addendum explaining any special circumstances. (EMAIL)

43. Arizona (158-164): An applicant may take the LSAT more than once; however, the scores usually will be averaged for use in the initial evaluation formula

43. Connecticut (159-163): While we average multiple LSAT scores, our Admissions Committee does take into consideration the difference in the scores and well as how long apart they were taken

43. Florida- Levin (153-162): An applicant’s multiple LSAT scores are averaged.

43. Maryland (156-162) 43: Multiple LSAT scores are normally averaged.

47. SMU- Dedman (155-163): Multiple LSAT scores are averaged.

47. Pittsburgh (157-162): The highest score is considered when making a decision

47. Utah (158-163): Not Sure.

50. Baylor (159-164): If the LSAT is taken more than once, the scores are averaged.

50. Colorado (160-164): The Admissions Committee will be able to see your scores for each individual examination, as well as your average score, when making admission decisions. The School of Law uses average scores for reporting purposes.

50. Kentucky (157-162): 4lawschool.com says that scores are averaged most of the time. 
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midjeep

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Re: Multiple LSAT Score Policies for Top 100 Schools
« Reply #2 on: November 26, 2004, 10:37:31 PM »
TIER 2:

53. Arizona State (154-161): We will average your score if you take the LSAT more than once.

53. Cardozo (160-164): We generally average LSAT scores. However, when there is a large discrepancy between an applicant’s scores, and an explanation is given for the discrepancy, the Admissions Committee may consider the higher score for admission purposes. If there is a particular reason why you think you performed much better on one of the exams, you should include an explanation with your application.

53. Tennessee (155-160): 4lawschool.com says highest.

56. American (158-162): We average multiple LSAT scores.

56. Case Western (156-159) 56: We average multiple LSAT scores.

56. Tulane (157-162): when candidates have more than one LSAT score, we look at the average score.

59. Loyola, CA (159-163): We will use the average.

59. Temple (157-162): Temple Law averages LSAT scores from tests taken within the last three years. If you took the LSAT more than three years ago, the score would not be averaged in.

59. Cincinnati (157-162):  Multiple test scores are averaged in almost all cases. (Students must petition the Admissions Committee on questions of multiple test scores.)

59. Houston (157-162): Law School Numbers says highest.

63. Chicago-Kent (157-161): If the LSAT is taken more than once, the Admissions Committee may consider the average score, the more recent score or the higher score, depending on individual circumstances.

63. Indiana-Indianapolis (152-158): We use your best score.

63. Kansas (154-160): 4lawschool.com says highest.

63. Missouri (156-160): While the Admissions Committee will see all scores, the dates taken and the percentile, we will use the average of the scores for admission and scholarship purposes.

67. Brooklyn (160-163): The Admissions Committee will see all reported scores, but attaches substantial weight to the highest score.

67. Florida State (154-159): If you take the LSAT more than once, the Committee will consider both scores.

67. Loyola, IL (159-162): Not Sure.

67. Oklahoma (155-161): LSDAS will report all scores and provide an average of them at the bottom of the page.  The Admissions Committee will certainly see any improvement that you have between the 2 scores and will definitely take notice of it. Because we are state funded, the State Regents restrict us to having no more that 15% of our entire student body to be non-residents.  Since some of our 2L and 3L students will change to instate, this gives the Admissions Committee more latitude to admit more than 15% for the first year class. (EMAIL)

67. San Diego (159-164): USD does not use the average LSAT score. The Admissions Committee only considers the higher score during the admissions review.

72. Rutgers State- Camden (160-163): Not Sure.

72. Rutgers State- Newark (155-161): Not Sure.

72. Oregon (156-161): We use the higher score as the indicator.

72. Richmond (158-162): The two scores will be averaged but you should explain the significant score increase.  If it is a big increase it will certainly be taken into consideration. (EMAIL)

72. Villanova (157-160): We take the highest.

77. Lewis and Clark (157-163): We average multiple LSAT scores.  The committee will be able to see all LSAT scores and will look for significant improvement.  We do not require an addendum explaining LSAT scores, however you can submit one with your application if you wish.

77. Northeastern (156-162): Not Sure.

77. Saint John’s (153-160): 4lawschool.com says highest.

77. Denver (152-161): 4lawschool.com says average.

77. Miami (154-160): 4lawschool.com says average.

82. Catholic (156-160): Not Sure.

82. St Louis University (153-160): If you take the LSAT more than once, the Admissions committee will review the circumstances of each test and will place more weight on an applicant’s highest score.

82. Buffalo- SUNY (153-158): Deloggio says average.

82. Hawaii (154-161): 4lawschool.com says highest.

82. Louisville (155-158): 4lawschool.com says average.

82. Nevada (151-159): 4lawschool.com says average.

82. South Carolina (155-160): 4lawschool.com says average.

89. Georgia State (156-160): Deloggio says average.

89. Hofstra (154-158): Will take the higher score if it is 8+ points higher.

89. LSU (152-158): 4lawschool.com says average.

89. Seton Hall (156-160): Following the guidelines from the Law School Admission Council and the American Bar Association, Seton Hall Law will use an average score for multiple tests.  We do consider both the high score and the average in our admission process and may use the higher score in evaluating the overall strength of your application.

89. Nebraska (152-158): 4lawschool.com says average.

94. Marquette (154-159): 4lawschool.com says highest.

94. Santa Clara (151-158): If the test is taken more than once, the higher score will be considered.

94. Mississippi (150-157): 4lawschool.com says average.

94. San Francisco (156-160):  Not Sure.

94. Toledo (153-159): Not Sure.

99. Mercer (153-157): Deloggio says average.

99. Pepperdine (156-161): 4lawschool.com says highest.

99. Seattle (151-158): If an applicant has more than one LSAT score, the Committee normally gives greater weight to the highest score. However, the Committee does not disregard previous scores and applicants are encouraged to discuss issues surrounding their prior performance in an addendum to their application.

99. Arkansas (150-158): Law School Numbers says highest.

99. Missouri (156-160): While the Admissions Committee will see all scores, the dates taken and the percentile, we will use the average of the scores for admission and scholarship purposes.

99. New Mexico (151-160): Not Sure.

http://www.lawschoolnumbers.com/multiple_lsat.php

http://www.4lawschool.com/multiplelsat.htm

http://www.usnews.com/usnews/edu/grad/rankings/law/brief/lawrank_brief.php

http://www.deloggio.com/homepage/faq/academic/twolsat.htm
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vmersich

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Re: Multiple LSAT Score Policies for Top 100 Schools
« Reply #3 on: November 26, 2004, 11:14:08 PM »
This was very generous and helpful.  I don't have multiple scores, but I thought I'd let you know how much it should (and probably will) be appreciated.

ohwellok

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Re: Multiple LSAT Score Policies for Top 100 Schools
« Reply #4 on: November 27, 2004, 12:48:17 AM »
you rock.   ;)

no, seriously. 

thank you, this was extremely helpful. 

Trel

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Re: Multiple LSAT Score Policies for Top 100 Schools
« Reply #5 on: November 28, 2004, 08:33:02 AM »
Great info, thank you
You can see my numbers at LSN

BGOM

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Re: Multiple LSAT Score Policies for Top 100 Schools
« Reply #6 on: November 29, 2004, 03:48:46 PM »
http://www.lawschooldiscussion.org/prelaw/index.php/topic,10492.msg158752.html#msg158752

Jeep,
    I emailed that list to you (and others who requested it) as a favor. It is really bad form to post someone else's work on a discussion board and offer to email it to those who ask without obtaining the author's permission. It took me ten seconds to go back and find that old post and would have been easy for you to send me a PM. I hope you are not going into IP Law.
   
    Here are a few schools that I have added to the list since I sent you the email. As is the case with the others, all of the explanations are a direct quote from the addcomm.

Minnesota (160-165) 19: The Admissions Committee policy is to consider the average score, of multiple LSAT scores, when evaluating an application for admission. However, if the applicant takes the LSAT a second or third time, and increases the LSAT score by four points, or more, then the Admissions Committee will consider the higher score.

Georgia (158-164) 31: When multiple LSAT scores are involved, we average the scores.

Fordham (163-167) 34: We will average the scores

UC- Hastings (160-165) 38:  Although multiple LSAT scores are averaged by Law Services, with a 10+ point differential in scores, the committee may review both scores separately.

Indiana (159-164) 40: if there is a substantial increase in the score, we would be inclined to look at the higher score.

Alabama (159-163) 40: We look at both scores individually. I am not sure how the committee weights the different scores, but they are looked at separately.

midjeep

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Re: Multiple LSAT Score Policies for Top 100 Schools
« Reply #7 on: November 29, 2004, 05:06:48 PM »
BGOM,
As I said earlier, I wanted to attribute the credit to the person who wrote the majority of the list, however I could not find the email (I usually clean out my emails so that is no surprise). I did do a search before I posted to see if I could find your name and the possible posting I received your email from, however too many hits came up for the phrase "multiple LSAT scores" and I couldn't think of a better phrase to search for. I am assuming you found that posting with your user name but you do have around 40 postings to search through when I have a little over 400 posts to search through. Additionally, I did remember a comment of yours stating that you would post the list on the board, but thought it too long to post in a single thread. I simply changed the ordering and split up the list making a posting of the list a feasible option. I apologize on my part for not completing the due diligence of checking every one of my posts and exhausting all search options on this search engine, but I assumed that the list was for the benefit of these LSDers and I merely made the list more accessible. Additionally, the fact that I could not find your posting necessiatated the posting to many who were asking about multiple LSATs (in my eyes). I also wanted to fill the few holes on the list and see if anyone else on this board had any additional information for this list. As far as breaking any IP laws, I posted this information for the benefit of LSDers, am not seeking any credit for all of the work, disclosed all sources (except for the one I could not find) I received my information from, and made an additional notation citing attribution to an unknown user (but just to address a similar point, I don't recall that you sought out permission from Deliggo, 4lawschool, LSN, or USNews to send out portions of its listings to anyone else). FYI, I have not sent out the revised or original list and will not send it out to anyone. As I said in the intro, I felt frustrated as do many others, about not having a single verifiable list describing LSAT policies for top 100 schools. I will remove the lists from the boards. If you want, I will email the revised copy of the new list to you and you can distribute it however you want. I only wanted to give back to the people on this board since I already got a lot out of it. I sincerely apologize for not finding you and asking you for permission.
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BGOM

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Re: Multiple LSAT Score Policies for Top 100 Schools
« Reply #8 on: November 29, 2004, 06:32:14 PM »
Jeep,
   Dude stop being silly; no one has accused you of breaking any laws nor has anyone requested that you take the lists down.
 Furthermore, I have no problem with that information being posted on this board. People on LSD have helped me numerous times and I am happy to return the favor. If I wanted to keep that list a secret, I would not have emailed it to a few people nor would I have updated the list on this very thread. I just wanted credit for the hours of work I spent compiling that list.
   In addition, saying that you: “disclosed all sources (except for the one I could not find)” when that “one” source gave you the information for about 95 of the one hundred schools is incredibly misleading.
   Moreover, we both know that there is a big difference between citing where I found a piece of information (publicly available on the www) and what you did. 
Finally, spending all that space telling me that I should not be annoyed with you, then giving me a “sincere” apology is really lame. If you didn’t think you did anything wrong, you would not have changed your initial post so that you appear to have given more credit.

midjeep

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Re: Multiple LSAT Score Policies for Top 100 Schools
« Reply #9 on: November 29, 2004, 07:39:25 PM »
BGOM,
I never changed my initial post. It has always said: "Most of the info is from a user who sent most of this list to me months ago but I forgot his user so I can't give him/her credit." so I did give credit to you but I didn't specifically attribute it to your name. and further explanation of your attribution "All the schools without sources came from the LSD user who emailed me the list. I am assuming that person either received an email or found the info on the schools website/brochure." I never alluded to the idea that I was "annoyed" by your post, I was simply providing an explanation with whatever misinterpretation might have occurred.   
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