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Author Topic: index score calculations  (Read 2388 times)

long_gone

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index score calculations
« on: November 01, 2004, 11:41:25 PM »
Call me an idiot because I am one but I just now realized that Manitoba's index score that they post on the site can be tailored to other schools.  Manitoba's index score is procured below:

2 * {(LSAT-120) / 3} + {(GPA * 60) / 4.5)

Well, this forumla is actually really simple to break down, especially the GPA part.  The GPA is worth 60% (hence *60) and 4.5 is their weird non-standard GPA scale (an A+ is a 4.5).  The LSAT part is worth 40%.  We can reproduce the index formula for UNB, which is also 60% GPA and 40% LSAT by making just one tweak:

2 * {(LSAT-120) / 3} + {(GPA * 60) / 4.3)}

Basically, all we've changed is the GPA scale (UNB is 4.3).  Even if that's not what the school uses, you can compare different results.  Even more exciting are the slight tweaks we can do for Western and Queen's.  Both schools are 50% GPA and 50% LSAT.  So:

2.5 * {(LSAT-120) / 3} + {(GPA * 50) / 4.0)}

I am not sure if both schools use a 4.0 scale, but let's assume they do.  In this way we can compare results of three schools that don't give an admission index formula.  So , for example, on Western's makeshift index I'd be:

2.5 * {(158-120) / 3} + {(3.99 * 50) / 4.0)} = 81.53

or, let's say a person has a 170 LSAT and a low GPA of 3.2:

2.5 * {(170-120) / 3} + {(3.2 * 50) / 4)} = 81.66

whereas their VERY competitive applicant (their words) is:

2.5 * {(160-120) / 3} + {(3.7 * 50) / 4)} = 79.58

ADDENDUM--this also works with schools that use percentages (if your school grades you on percentages, that is).  The formula would simply be:

2.5 * {(LSAT-120) / 3} + {(GPA% * 50) / 100)}

Hence for UBC, if their competitive applicant is a person with an 80% average and a 162 LSAT, and they treat the GPA and LSAT at 50-50, the competitive index score would be:

2.5 * {(162-120) / 3} + {(80 * 50) / 100)} = 75

These forumlas obviously aren't necessarily what schools use, but it should be a good guide.  Also, because of different GPA scales, the results can't be directly be compared against other schools (i.e. UBC's index scores can't directly be compared with Western's by this formula).  However, this is useful for people who, like me, have large spreads in numbers and wonder how they compare to more 'balanced' applicants.  Indeed, I'd say few people have exactly what the schools are looking for, and this should help you know where you stand.  This formula should also work for other schools whose weight of GPA against the LSAT we know.  Thank you UofM for that simple forumla. 

I know I'm a nerd, btw.
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Morgin

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Re: index score calculations
« Reply #1 on: November 02, 2004, 01:51:19 AM »
good to know that my 3.4 and 165 still leaves me in the running!

long_gone

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Re: index score calculations
« Reply #2 on: November 02, 2004, 12:19:55 PM »
addendum added
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Yardo

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Re: index score calculations
« Reply #3 on: November 05, 2004, 03:26:33 PM »
caecilius -- with your GPA of 3.99 and a 158 on the lsat, you're a shoe-in for UBC.  For one thing, they use %'s, not gpa, to weigh applications, so your average would probably go up because of that. 

I got accepted to UBC after having BOMBED the LSAT (154).  My GPA is a little higher than yours... 4.0 on the 4-point scale, and something like 4.12 on the 4.3 point scale.  Anyway, what UBC cares about is %'s and mine is 88% (AND, I haven't even finished my degree-- if you have, they'll take some bad marks off).  So figure out your % score, and then, if you want to, apply to UBC.  I really think that you will not have a problem getting in.

Call me an idiot because I am one but I just now realized that Manitoba's index score that they post on the site can be tailored to other schools.  Manitoba's index score is procured below:

2 * {(LSAT-120) / 3} + {(GPA * 60) / 4.5)

Well, this forumla is actually really simple to break down, especially the GPA part.  The GPA is worth 60% (hence *60) and 4.5 is their weird non-standard GPA scale (an A+ is a 4.5).  The LSAT part is worth 40%.  We can reproduce the index formula for UNB, which is also 60% GPA and 40% LSAT by making just one tweak:

2 * {(LSAT-120) / 3} + {(GPA * 60) / 4.3)}

Basically, all we've changed is the GPA scale (UNB is 4.3).  Even if that's not what the school uses, you can compare different results.  Even more exciting are the slight tweaks we can do for Western and Queen's.  Both schools are 50% GPA and 50% LSAT.  So:

2.5 * {(LSAT-120) / 3} + {(GPA * 50) / 4.0)}

I am not sure if both schools use a 4.0 scale, but let's assume they do.  In this way we can compare results of three schools that don't give an admission index formula.  So , for example, on Western's makeshift index I'd be:

2.5 * {(158-120) / 3} + {(3.99 * 50) / 4.0)} = 81.53

or, let's say a person has a 170 LSAT and a low GPA of 3.2:

2.5 * {(170-120) / 3} + {(3.2 * 50) / 4)} = 81.66

whereas their VERY competitive applicant (their words) is:

2.5 * {(160-120) / 3} + {(3.7 * 50) / 4)} = 79.58

ADDENDUM--this also works with schools that use percentages (if your school grades you on percentages, that is).  The formula would simply be:

2.5 * {(LSAT-120) / 3} + {(GPA% * 50) / 100)}

Hence for UBC, if their competitive applicant is a person with an 80% average and a 162 LSAT, and they treat the GPA and LSAT at 50-50, the competitive index score would be:

2.5 * {(162-120) / 3} + {(80 * 50) / 100)} = 75

These forumlas obviously aren't necessarily what schools use, but it should be a good guide.  Also, because of different GPA scales, the results can't be directly be compared against other schools (i.e. UBC's index scores can't directly be compared with Western's by this formula).  However, this is useful for people who, like me, have large spreads in numbers and wonder how they compare to more 'balanced' applicants.  Indeed, I'd say few people have exactly what the schools are looking for, and this should help you know where you stand.  This formula should also work for other schools whose weight of GPA against the LSAT we know.  Thank you UofM for that simple forumla. 

I know I'm a nerd, btw.

long_gone

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Re: index score calculations
« Reply #4 on: November 06, 2004, 03:15:44 PM »
That's good to know, but UBC is too far from everything to consider. 
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